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Course Syllabus

Course: MATH 1080

Division: Natural Science and Math
Department: Mathematics
Title: Pre-Calculus

Semester Approved: Summer 2016
Five-Year Review Semester: Summer 2021
End Semester: Summer 2022

Catalog Description: In this course students will study polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, relations, and applications.; Additional topics include sequences and series, conic sections, matrices, the binomial theorem, modeling, and graphing technology. This course prepares students for calculus.

General Education Requirements: Quantitative Literacy (MA)
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 5; Lecture: 5; Lab: 0

Prerequisites: A grade of B or higher in Math 1010 or equivalent, an ACT score of 25 or higher, or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or student must (re-) take placement test.

Justification: Math 1080 is the college algebra/trigonometry course providing the material for many students in their various majors. It also fulfills the Quantitative Literacy General Education Requirement. It is similar to courses offered by other colleges and universities in the state. This course is also a useful semester long review for students returning to school after an extended period of time.

General Education Outcomes:
1: A student who completes the GE curriculum will have a fundamental knowledge of human cultures and the natural world, with particular emphasis on American institutions, the social and behavioral sciences, the physical and life sciences, the humanities, the fine arts and personal wellness.  In pre-calculus, students acquire significant problem-solving skills through algebra and trigonometry. This course provides students with fundamental knowledge to apply critical-thinking to a variety of topics in human cultures and the natural world. This ability to problem-solve in the natural world will be assessed through homework, exams, and, at the instructor's discretion, quizzes, student projects or presentations, etc.

2: A student who completes the GE curriculum can read, retrieve, evaluate, interpret, and deliver information using a variety of traditional and electronic media. Math is often referred to as a foreign language. Students must be able to carefully examine a given problem then determine and execute a plan for solving the problem. Often the information given is presented using symbols and variables the student must be able to read and interpret mathematically within the context of the given problem. In addition to learning new concepts, pre-calculus students are taught many new ways to express their new understanding using various mathematical symbols. This ability to read, retrieve, evaluate, interpret, and deliver mathematical information will be evaluated using homework, quizzes, or exams, and, at the instructor's discretion, student projects or presentations, etc.

4: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason quantitatively in a variety of contexts. A typical pre-calculus course provides multiple opportunities to examine math as it manifests itself in the world. By the end of the course, successful students will be proficient at using such skills. Problems to analyze potentially come from a variety of areas, such as business, human behavior, natural and social sciences, and medicine. Mastery of these skills will be assessed through homework, exams, and, at the instructor's discretion, quizzes, student projects or presentations, etc.

6: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason analytically, critically, and creatively about nature, culture, facts, values, ethics, and civic policy. The pre-calculus course consists of algebra and trigonometry, which are of themselves logical processes of solving and analyzing problems. Therefore, this course gives students an increased ability to critically approach situations which call for numerical and logical solutions. In addition, students can propose creative, new solutions. Proficiency of these skills will be assessed through homework, exams, and, at the instructor's discretion, quizzes, student projects or presentations, etc.


Student Learning Outcomes:
Demonstrate an ability to solve problems using methods resulting from theorems used in this course.
Throughout mathematics, theorems are used to understand why a process will achieve the desired outcome. Students will learn various theorems as they go through this course and will learn new methods of solving problems that result. As they understand these theorems and the solving methods, they will be able to demonstrate their ability to solve problems using those methods on their homework, quizzes, or exams, and, at the instructor's discretion, student projects or presentations, etc. 

Be familiar with many common functions as well as their graphs.
Students will be expected to be familiar with many common functions as well as basic features of their graphs. This familiarity will be demonstrated by their ability to graph and analyze various functions (such as polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential functions, trigonometric functions, etc.). This ability to graph functions will be demonstrated on homework, quizzes, or exams, and, at the instructor's discretion, student projects or presentations, etc.
 

Apply mathematical knowledge to real world problems.
As students learn new mathematical skills, they will also be given opportunities to use those skills to solve real world problems (often referred to as story problems). This ability will be assessed using homework, quizzes, or exams, and, at the instructor's discretion, student projects or presentations, etc. 

Understand and use mathematics as a language to communicate.
As students continue to learn new mathematical concepts, they will also be expected to both understand and use the language of mathematics to communicate those concepts. This ability to understand and use mathematics as a language to communicate will be demonstrated and assessed via quizzes, homework, or exams, and, at the instructor's discretion, student projects or presentations, etc. 

Explore and analyze mathematical concepts using technology as appropriate.
Students will be expected to use technology (most often in the form of graphing calculators) in order to deepen understanding and mastery of mathematical concepts. This ability to explore and analyze mathematical concepts with the aid of appropriate technology will be assessed using homework, quizzes, or exams, and, at the instructor's discretion, student projects or presentations, etc. 


Content:
Through lecture, class discussions, and homework this course will include:
• Linear Equations and Inequalities
• Relations (Conic Sections and Inequalities)
• Functions
o Polynomial and Rational functions
o Exponential and Logarithmic functions
o Trigonometric functions
• Systems of Equations and Inequalities
• Matrices
• Sequences and Series
• Binomial Theorem

Key Performance Indicators:
Student learning may be evaluated using:

Homework (5 - 20%) 

Quizzes (0 - 20%) 

Midterms or Chapter Tests (20 - 70%) 

Attendance and/or Participation (0 - 10%) 

Presentations/Projects (0 - 20%) 

Comprehensive Final Exam (20 - 35%) 

 

 

 

 



Representative Text and/or Supplies:
Precalculus, Zill & Dewar, current edition


Pedagogy Statement:


Maximum Class Size: 36
Optimum Class Size: 25