Course Syllabus

Course: MATH 1210

Division: Natural Science and Math
Department: Mathematics
Title: Calculus I

Semester Approved: Spring 2019
Five-Year Review Semester: Summer 2024
End Semester:

Catalog Description: This course is an introduction to calculus: functions and their limits, especially as applied to derivatives and integrals. Topics include continuity of functions, techniques and applications of differentiation (related rates, graphing, and optimization), and elementary techniques and applications of integration. These topics are applied to algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 5; Lecture: 5; Lab: 0

Prerequisites: Math 1050 and Math 1060 or Math 1080 with a C or better, ACT math score of 36 or higher, or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or student must (re-)take placement test.

Justification: Calculus is a required topic in a wide variety of major programs; e.g., engineering, pre-med, mathematics, physics, chemistry, etc. This course is similar to introductory calculus courses taught across the state.


Student Learning Outcomes:
Students will demonstrate understanding of, and solve problems involving limits, including delta-epsilon arguments.  Students will be assessed through exams and the instructor's choice of homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.

Students will demonstrate understanding of the meaning of the derivative and be able to solve problems using the derivative. Students will be assessed through exams and the instructor's choice of homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.

Students will demonstrate understanding of the significance of the (definite) integral and solve problems using the (definite) integral. Students will be assessed through exams and the instructor's choice of homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.

Students will demonstrate understanding of and correctly apply major theorems, including the Intermediate Value Theorem, Extreme Value Theorem, Mean Value Theorem, and Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Students will be assessed through exams and the instructor's choice of homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.

Students will use calculus techniques to solve problems in science and business, including related rates and optimization. Students will be assessed through exams and the instructor's choice of homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.

Students will demonstrate gain familiarity with a computational software package such as Maple, Matlab, Maxima, Python, SageMath, Mathematica, etc. Students will be assessed through the instructor's choice of homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.


Content:
--Brief review of algebra and trigonometry --Functions and limits, including delta epsilon arguments --The meaning of the derivative and differentiation techniques --Applications of the derivative including related rates, optimization, and L'Hopital's rule. --The meaning of the (definite) integral and elementary integration techniques --Applications of integration including volumes of 3D shapes

Key Performance Indicators:
Group Work/Participation 0 to 15%

Presentations/Projects 0 to 20%

Quizzes  0 to 20%

Homework 5 to 25%

Midterm Exams 20 to 70%

Final Exam 15 to 35%


Representative Text and/or Supplies:
Weir, Thomas' Calculus: Early Transcendentals, Current Edition, Pearson.


Pedagogy Statement:
Instructors will use a variety of teaching methods including lectures, readings, activities and projects both inside and outside of class, and technology activities that may require either the use of a laptop in class or a visit to a computer lab.

Instructional Mediums:
Lecture

Maximum Class Size: 36
Optimum Class Size: 20