Course: MATH 1220

Division: Natural Science and Math
Department: Mathematics
Title: Calculus II

Semester Approved: Spring 2019
Five-Year Review Semester: Summer 2024
End Semester:

Catalog Description: This course is a continuation of the study of calculus. Topics include techniques of integration and applications, numeric integration techniques, calculus in conic sections and polar coordinates, infinite sequences and series (tests for convergence), and introduction to vectors.

Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 4; Lecture: 4; Lab: 0

Prerequisites: Math 1210

Justification: Calculus is a required topic in a wide variety of major programs including, but not limited to, mathematics and mathematics education, engineering, pre-med, physics, chemistry, and other science intensive areas. The course is similar to other second semester calculus courses across the state.


Student Learning Outcomes:
Students will know a variety of integration techniques (including integration by parts, partial fractions, tables/CAS, and numerical integration) and use these techniques to correctly solve problems.  Students will be assessed through exams and the instructor's choice of additional assessment through homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.

Students will know and be able to use a variety of techniques (including comparison tests, ratio test, root test, p-test, and nth-term test) to determine whether an infinite series converges or diverges.  Students will be assessed through exams and the instructor's choice of additional assessment through homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.

Students will apply calculus techniques to parametric curves and polar coordinates.  Students will be assessed through exams and the instructor's choice of additional assessment through homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.

Students will use the Taylor series to represent functions and solve problems. Students will be assessed through exams and the instructor's choice of additional assessment through homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.

Students will be able to solve problems using vector arithmetic in 2D and 3D. Students will be assessed through exams and the instructor's choice of additional assessment through homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.

Student will gain familiarity with a computational software package such as Maple, Matlab, Maxima, Python, SageMath, Mathematica, etc. Students will be assessed through homework, quizzes, group work, projects, and/or presentations.


Content:
This course will include:
• Integrals and transcendental functions
• Techniques of integration --integration by table and/or CAS --by parts --by partial fractions --by trigonometric substitution --by numerical approximation (trapezoid, Simpson's)
• Improper integrals
• Applications of integration
• Calculus in conic sections and polar coordinates
• Infinite sequences and series
• Convergence tests
• Power series (including Taylor Series) and applications
• Introduction to vectors (2D and 3D)

Key Performance Indicators:
Group Work/Participation 0 to 15%

Presentations/Projects 0 to 20%

Quizzes 0 to 20%

Homework 5 to 25%

Midterm Exams 20 to 70%

Final Exam 15 to 35%


Representative Text and/or Supplies:
Weir, Thomas? Calculus: Early Transcendentals, Current Edition, Pearson


Pedagogy Statement:
Instructors will use a variety of teaching methods including lectures, readings, activities and projects both inside and outside of class, and technology activities that may require either the use of a laptop in class or a visit to a computer lab.

Instructional Mediums:
Lecture

Maximum Class Size: 36
Optimum Class Size: 20