Course Syllabus

Course: HFST 2400

Division: Social and Behavioral Science
Department: Home and Family Studies
Title: Family Relations

Semester Approved: Spring 2012
Five-Year Review Semester: Summer 2023
End Semester: Summer 2025

Catalog Description: This course provides students with a realistic, engaging, personally relevant, and academically informative introduction to the study of intimate relationships, marriage, and families. The course discusses family theory (family systems theory, structure function theory, exchange theory, conflict theory, family development theory etc.), using examples taken from contemporary literature, professional journals, and film.

General Education Requirements: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 3; Lecture: 3; Lab: 0

Justification: This course is designed to be an introductory course in the study of the family and the many issues that impact these relationships. The course is required for Human Development, Family Science, and Family and Consumer Science Education majors. The course is also required for the Snow College Family Life one-year Certificate of Completion and the Child Care Management Applied Associate Degree. This course is most similar to HDFS 2400 at Utah State University, FLHD 2400 at Southern Utah University, FCS 2400 at University of Utah, CHF 2400 at Weber State University.

General Education Outcomes:
1: A student who completes the GE curriculum will have a fundamental knowledge of human cultures and the natural world, with particular emphasis on American institutions, the social and behavioral sciences, the physical and life sciences, the humanities, the fine arts and personal wellness.  After completing this course, students are prepared to recognize, understand, and appreciate the complex entity and diversity that constitutes a family. Students read, watch, and discuss a variety of primary sources in order to understand the changing family structure. Students will demonstrate their knowledge through class discussions, film review, written assignments, and exams.

2: A student who completes the GE curriculum can read, retrieve, evaluate, interpret, and deliver information using a variety of traditional and electronic media. After completing this course, students are prepared to work with a variety of media sources as they engage in analysis of marriage, family, and intimate relationships. Students read, watch, and discuss class concepts and theory using contemporary media designed to elicit critical responses. Students knowledge is assessed through class discussion, exam, and essay.

3: A student who completes the GE curriculum can speak and write effectively and respectfully as a member of the global community, and work effectively as a member of a team. Students address the complex and diverse topic of family relationships in every class discussion, written assignment, and exam. To further analyze their understanding, the students research their own family of orientation from a number of different contexts including their family history, family culture, family values, family tradition and rituals, family dynamics, and family processes. Their findings will then be assessed by peers and the instructor.

4: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason quantitatively in a variety of contexts. Students will be able to compare and contrast how families have changed structurally, socially, culturally, environmentally, and politically throughout history. Students will demonstrate their knowledge through group work and written exam.

5: A student who completes the GE curriculum can respond with informed sensitivity to an artistic work or experience. Students will learn how to apply existing theories about human behavior in a family setting, discuss and develop new theories, then analyze those theories. Students will research up-to-date and relevant information on family theory and practice. Students will then reflect on their own family experiences and combine both relevant research to personal family experiences. Students' research and knowledge will then be assessed through written assignment.

6: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason analytically, critically, and creatively about nature, culture, facts, values, ethics, and civic policy. Students will address the complex and diverse topic of family relationships in every class discussion, written assignment, and exam. To further analyze their understanding, the students research their own family orientation from under a number of different contexts including their family history, family culture, family values, family tradition and rituals, family dynamics, and family processes. Their findings will then be assessed by peers and the instructor.

General Education Knowledge Area Outcomes:
1: Students will identify and describe the different types of families and explain why it is so difficult to define what a family is in today's society. Students will also cultivate an opinion on controversial topics dealing with families of all cultural backgrounds. Student's knowledge will be assessed through class discussion, written assignment, and written exam. Students will identify and describe the different types of families and explain why it is so difficult to define what a family is in today's society. Students will also cultivate an opinion on controversial topics dealing with families of all cultural backgrounds. Student's knowledge will be assessed through class discussion, written assignment, and written exam.

2: Develop and communicate hypothetical explanations for individual human behavior within the large-scale historical or social context. Students address the complex and diverse topic of family relationships in every class discussion and written assignment and exam. Students also describe how families have changed throughout history and how the roles of family members have changed over time influencing the structure of our society. Students will demonstrate their knowledge through group work and written exam.

3: Draw on the social and behavioral sciences to evaluate contemporary problems using social science research methodology. Students address the complex and diverse topic of family relationships in every class discussion, written assignment, and exam. To further analyze their understanding, the students research their own family of orientation from a number of different contexts including their family history, family culture, family values, family tradition and rituals, family dynamics, and family processes. Their findings will then be assessed by peers and the instructor.

4: Describe and analytically compare social, political, economic, cultural, geographical, and historical settings and processes other than one?s own. Students will be able to compare and contrast how families have changed structurally, socially, culturally, environmentally, and politically throughout history. Students will demonstrate their knowledge through group work and written exam.

5: Explain and use the social-scientific method to test research questions and draw conclusions. Students will learn how to apply existing theories about human behavior in a family setting, discuss and develop new theories, then analyze those theories. Students will research up-to-date and relevant information on family theory and practice. Students will then reflect on their own family experiences and combine both relevant research to personal family experiences. Students' research and knowledge will then be assessed through written assignment.

6: Write effectively within the social science discipline, using correct disciplinary guidelines, to analyze, interpret, and communicate about social science phenomena. Students will be able to apply and connect theoretical framework exhibited in film by families to the relationship principles, family paradigms, and family theory discussed in class. Students will also cultivate an opinion on controversial topics dealing with families by analyzing the class lecture and textbook readings. They will demonstrate their ability to form an opinion through written assignment, class discussion and written exam.


Student Learning Outcomes:
Students will identify and describe the different types of families and explain why it is so difficult to define what a family is in today's society. Student's knowledge will be assessed through class discussion, group work, and written exams.

Students will identify and describe the key factors associated with maintaining healthy family relationships.  Students will demonstrate this through group discussion, scientific journal review, and written exams.

Students will cultivate an opinion on controversial topics dealing with families. Students will demonstrate their ability for form an opinion through written assignments.

Students will be able to apply and connect theoretical framework exhibited in film by families to the relationship principles, family paradigms, and family theory discussed in class. Students will demonstrate this through class discussion, written assignments and exams.


Content:
Content: ? Relationship Principles ? Family Life Now - Families in Context ? Understanding Families Through Research & Theory ? Family Communication, Conflict & Forgiveness ? Gender in Today's Society ? Intimacy & Affectionate Bonds ? Love and the Path to Commitment ? Sexuality ? Parenting ? Relationship Deterioration & Divorce ? Family Change: Stress, Crisis & Transition

Key Performance Indicators:
Exams, class project, written assignments and readings.

Exams 30 to 40%

Class project 10 to 20%

Written assignment and readings 50 to 60%


Representative Text and/or Supplies:
Olson, D. H. & DeFrain J., Marriages and Families: Intimacy, Diversity, and Strengths, current edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill


Pedagogy Statement:
HFST 2400 is a course taught through lecture, class discussion, film review, written assignment, and exam. This class provides students with a realistic, engaging, personally relevant, and academically informative introduction to the study of intimate relationships, marriage, and families.

Instructional Mediums:
Lecture

Maximum Class Size: 35
Optimum Class Size: 30