Course Syllabus

Course: TESL 2650

Division: Humanities
Department: Teach English as Second Lang
Title: Language in Society

Semester Approved: Spring 2015
Five-Year Review Semester: Spring 2020
End Semester: Spring 2021

Catalog Description: We are all intimately familiar with at least one language: our own. Few native speakers, however, stop to consider what they know about their own language and how their language shapes daily life. This course will provide students with a basic introduction to language and the relationship of language to society. Examples will be taken from a wide variety of languages and cultures. This course is cross-listed with ENGL 2650.

General Education Requirements: Humanities (HU)
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Credit/Time Requirement: Credit: 3; Lecture: 3; Lab: 0
Clock/Hour Requirements: 0

Prerequisites: N/A

Corequisites: N/A


Justification: There is probably no subject which is so crucial to normal human functioning, and about which so little is understood, as language. Building language awareness (of one's own as well as other languages and the cultures in which they operate) is an important priority in today's world. We must communicate with an ever increasing number of people from cultures other than our own. It is necessary to be aware of the relationships between language and culture, and of their interconnected systems which together constitute language. At Snow College this course will fulfill a general education option in the Humanities Division. The course is also a major requirement for students in Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL). This course fulfills Humanities credit and is equivalent to Utah State University ENGL 4230 and Utah Valley State College ENGL 2030. It also fills in Arts and Science Elective credit for Brigham Young University.The Humanities are a group of academic disciplines that study the many ways by which humans have attempted to understand themselves and their world. At Snow College, the Humanities focus on cultural traditions that are expressed largely through text or which have a strong textual component: language, literature, and philosophy. The methods by which the Humanities study culture are at once analytical and interpretive, objective and subjective, historical and aesthetic.

General Education Outcomes:
1: A student who completes the GE curriculum will have a fundamental knowledge of human cultures and the natural world, with particular emphasis on American institutions, the social and behavioral sciences, the physical and life sciences, the humanities, the fine arts and personal wellness.  Students will demonstrate they understand that language is not static and that it is continually evolving. They will learn the nature of human language and be able to understand the aspects of language and culture including social and geographical dialects, child language acquisition and language universals. Through class discussions, observations, group presentation and essay exams students will demonstrate that they have internalized the material presented.

2: A student who completes the GE curriculum can read, retrieve, evaluate, interpret, and deliver information using a variety of traditional and electronic media. Students will demonstrate that they can pick up on negatively and positively charged words that writers and speakers use to sway readers. They will understand tone (sarcasm, sincerity, irony, humor, anger, mocking, etc.) Students will report to the class their discoveries.

3: A student who completes the GE curriculum can speak and write effectively and respectfully as a member of the global community, and work effectively as a member of a team. Students will demonstrate that they can work together in groups to present material to other class members on various topics throughout the course. Students will demonstrate that they can write clearly and effectively as they do research, write term papers, and take essay exams. They will understand tone (sarcasm, sincerity, irony, humor, anger, mocking, etc.) Students will report to the class their discoveries and will follow up with their class report with written interpretive responses citing specific examples of the pragmatic aspects of the language. Students will work on this through the semester and get feedback from the instructor and classmates in order to write a final analysis.

6: A student who completes the GE curriculum can reason analytically, critically, and creatively about nature, culture, facts, values, ethics, and civic policy. Students will analyze and critically look at biased news articles and pick out the charged words that are used to sway the reader. Students will look at different cultures and become familiar with the creative nature of language and how it reflects its culture. Students will learn about the ethics of field testing in Sociolinguistics and the challenges faced in such studies. Students will demonstrate the above mentioned items through quizzes, class presentations, and tests.


Student Learning Outcomes:
Ask and explore a variety of philosophical and theoretical questions about human thought and experience. Students will be able to explain and understand the impact that language has on society and the impact that society has on language by reading the text and discovering through personal reflection how people use aspects of language (kinesics, proxemics, speech acts, manipulation of rules, etc.) to communicate. Through class discussions, observations, group presentations and essay exams students will demonstrate that they have internalized the material presented. 

Understand how knowledge is created through the study of language systems literature and/or philosophy. Students will be able to appreciate multiple languages and cultures. They will be able to understand that languages change, develop, evolve and are created through the human experience. Through reading, discussion and self-examination, students will recognize their own cultures' rules of sociolinguistic acts. Through class discussions, observations, group presentations and essay exams, students will be able to articulate the rules of their own language and culture. 

Understand cultural traditions within an historical context and make connections with the present. Students will be able to understand that language is not static and that it is continually evolving. They will learn the nature of human language and be able to understand aspects of language and culture including social and geographical dialects, child language acquisition and language universals. Through class discussions, observations, group presentations, and essay exams, students will demonstrate that they have internalized the material presented. 

Critically read and respond to primary texts (original, un-interpreted) from a Humanities' perspective. Students will read newspapers, news journals and news reports, and will be able to pick up on negatively and positively charged words that writers use to sway readers. They will understand tone (sarcasm, sincerity, irony, humor, anger, mocking, etc.) Through the semester students will report to the class their discoveries. 

Write effectively within the Humanities discipline to analyze and form critical and aesthetic judgments. Students will pick up on negatively and positively charged words that writers use to sway readers. They will understand tone (sarcasm, sincerity, irony, humor, anger, mocking, etc.) Students will report to the class their discoveries and will follow up their class report with written interpretive responses citing specific examples of the pragmatic aspects of the language. Students will work on this through the semester and get feedback from the instructor and classmates in order to write a final analysis. 


Content:
This course will include:
• What is Language?
• Field Methods
• Kinesics: The Silent Language
• Pragmatics
• Orality and Literacy
• Everybody Speaks a Dialect
• Bilingualism: Individual and Social
• Speech Communities
• Gender and Language These topics will be addressed through the use of textbook materials, journal articles, scholarly writing, films, video clips and works of literature in which different dialects and registers and other elements of sociolinguistics are obvious.

Key Performance Indicators:
A course grade will be determined using the following percentage weights:

participation in class and group activities: 20% 

essays and quizzes: 35% 

homework assignments: 20% of final grade 

final exam: 25% of final grade 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Representative Text and/or Supplies:
Elaine Chiaka, Language: The Social Mirror, current edition, Heinle and Heinle.


Pedagogy Statement:


Maximum Class Size: 15
Optimum Class Size: 12