CHEM 1115 Course

Division: Natural Science and Mathematics

Department: Chemistry

Course: CHEM 1115

Title: Elementary Chemistry Laboratory

Description:

This is a general inorganic and organic chemistry laboratory which reinforces the fundamental facts, theories and laws of chemistry through laboratory experiences. (It is designed for students in home economics, nursing, physical therapy, some areas of biology, forestry and agriculture, as well as other related health sciences.) Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1110 is required.

A lab fee is required.

Student Learning Outcomes:

1) Apply scientific reasoning in a variety of contexts.

Students will be able to apply principles taught in general chemistry involving the scientific method, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions chemistry and equilibrium. At the conclusion of this course students should have sufficient knowledge of chemical principles and laboratory techniques to be able to continue with CHEM 1120 or meet requirements in their major department. Students will be evaluated through written lab reports and the lab final.

2) Use the concepts of physical science to solve daily problems.

Students will demonstrate the ability to apply the concepts of the scientific method, chemical stoichiometry, gas laws and solution chemistry to draw conclusions related to their laboratory projects. These laboratory projects relate to topics such as: how soap functions, distillation, and combustion. Students will be evaluated through written lab reports and the lab final.

3) Understand how physical scientists think and form judgments about the physical world.

Students will demonstrate the ability to apply the scientific method in problem solving to form conclusions about phenomena observed in lab and apply them to the course material. Students will be evaluated as part of written laboratory reports and the lab final.

4) Assess the credibility of scientific information.

This Outcome will be covered in the co-requisite lecture course.

5) Recognize the manifestations of physical science in phenomena of the everyday world.

Students will demonstrate the ability to connect the principles of Chemistry with everyday occurrences as experienced through hands-on laboratory experiments. For example: hydrophobic/hydrophilic functions of traditional and synthetic soaps, measurement of density, and fractional distillation. Their performance will be evaluated through written lab reports and the lab final.

6) Acquire the tools necessary for life-long learning in physical science.

Students will demonstrate the ability to use the tools of the trade as applied to laboratory experiments. For example: measurements of mass and volume, titration of an acid and error propagation. They will be evaluated through written lab reports and the lab final.

7) Identify something acquired in the course about which he/she has become passionate.

Students will identify a topic or application of the course material about which they are passionate as part of their laboratory final. Students will be evaluated based on responses to their lab final.


Courses Taught Fall 2017

1115    W  6:00 pm-7:50 pm    Anderson, George M.    
1115    TH  2:30 pm-4:20 pm    Peterson, Adrian    
1115      5:00 pm-5:00 pm    Black, Daniel W.    
1115      5:00 pm-5:00 pm    Blackner, Nathan B.    
1115    W  8:30 am-10:20 am    Walker, Robert    
1115    W  3:00 pm-4:50 pm    Thalman, Ryan M.    
1115      5:00 pm-5:00 pm    Jones, Bryant    
1115    T  2:30 pm-4:20 pm    Jones, Bryant    
1115    M  2:30 pm-4:20 pm    Walker, Robert    

Courses Taught Spring 2018

1115    TH  2:30 pm-4:20 pm    Walker, Robert    
1115    T  2:30 pm-4:20 pm    Walker, Robert    
1115    W  6:00 pm-7:50 pm    Anderson, George M.    
1115      5:00 pm-5:00 pm    Black, Daniel W.    
1115    M  2:30 pm-4:20 pm    Jones, Bryant    
1115    W  6:30 pm-8:30 pm    Thalman, Ryan M.    
1115    TAUGHT ONLINE   Black, Daniel W.    
1115      5:00 pm-5:00 pm    Jones, Bryant    
1115      5:00 pm-5:00 pm    Blackner, Nathan B.    

View Syllabus