GE Courses

Below, you will find the courses that satisfy one or more of our General Education areas.

 

American Institutions (AI)

This course is designed to provide an introduction into the economic growth and development of the United States from the colonial period to the present. This course analyzes how the evolution of the American economy and institutions, as well as important historical events, have affected and influenced the economic system of the United States of America. Successful completion of this course satisfies the American Institutions (AI) requirement established by the Utah State Legislature and USHE.

This course is designed to provide an introduction into American history from pre-contact Native American societies through the present day.

This course covers the development of the United States to 1877, to include the Colonial Period, the American Revolution, the Nationalistic Period, Westward Expansion, Sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. HIST 2700, taken in conjunction with HIST 2710, will satisfy the American Institutions requirement established by the Utah State Legislature.

This course covers the development of the United States from 1877 to the present, to include Industrialism, the Last Frontier, the Progressive Era, World War I, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and New Deal, World War II, the Cold War Era, the Civil Rights Movement, and Contemporary America. HIST 2710, taken in conjunction with HIST 2700, will satisfy the American Institutions requirement established by the Utah State Legislature.

This course introduces students to the political, historical, and economic foundations of the United States Constitution.; Through examining and critically analyzing primary sources, students will develop a deeper understanding of the varied ideas and forces that founded, reinforces, and challenges our current constitutional system.; This process will enable students to engage in all levels of politics as more informed and deliberate actors.

This course is an introduction to the structure, function, and political dynamics of the major actors, ideas, and institutions within the American governmental system.

English I (E1)

This course emphasizes critical reading, writing, and thinking skills through writing-intensive workshops. It explores writing situations as a complex process focusing specifically on idea generation relative to audience and purpose, working through multiple drafts, peer collaboration, and revision, and it includes rhetorical analysis. See prerequisites.

Prerequisites

Students who have an ACT English score of 11-17 or an SAT verbal score of 368-483 are encouraged to take English 0980 or 0991 before taking English 1010. Students who have an ACT English score of 10 or below, or an SAT verbal score lower than 368, are required to take ENGL 0980 or ENGL 0991 prior to enrolling in ENGL 1010. Non-native speakers of English must complete ESL 1051 Level 3 Composition, score a 4 or higher on the Test of Written English (TWE), or take a written exam (graded by ESL department faculty members) before they can register for ENGL 1010 (see the Snow College catalog for more detailed information).

This course emphasizes critical reading, writing, and thinking skills through writing-intensive workshops. It explores writing situations as a complex process focusing specifically on idea generation relative to audience and purpose, working through multiple drafts, peer collaboration, and revision, and it includes rhetorical analysis. See prerequisites.*Open to Student Support Services participants only.

Prerequisites

*Students must qualify through Student Support Services to enroll in this version of English 1010 that meets five days per week. Students who have an ACT English score of 10 or below, or an SAT verbal score lower than 368, are required to take ENGL 0980 or ENGL 0991 prior to enrolling in ENGL 1010. Non-native speakers of English must complete ESL 1051 Level 3 Composition, score a 4 or higher on the Test of Written English (TWE), or take a written exam (graded by ESL department faculty members) before they can register for ENGL 1010 (see the Snow College catalog for more detailed information).

This course emphasizes critical reading, writing, and thinking skills through writing-intensive workshops. It explores writing situations as a complex process focusing specifically on idea generation relative to audience and purpose, working through multiple drafts, peer collaboration, and revision, and it includes rhetorical analysis. English 1015 differs from English 1010 by adding extra support for students during a fourth class session per week. English 1015 is recommended for students with ACT scores in English of 12-14.

English II (E2)

Students will build on the skills learned in ENGL 1010 in this intermediate writing course designed to improve students' reading, writing, research, and critical thinking skills. The course may include expository, persuasive, and/or argumentative writing emphases. The course will require several research oriented writing assignments. Students must achieve a C- or higher in this course to receive GE credit.

Prerequisites

Completion of ENGL 1010 or equivalent with a grade of C- or better

This course is designed to improve the composition skills of honors students through an honors thesis project. Students will study effective discourse, argumentation, and research methods. They will select a subject for their thesis project and work with an advisor in the field of study. This class replaces; English 2010 as part of the; English GE requirement, and students must achieve a C- or higher to receive GE credit. (Additional fee required)

Prerequisites

ENGL 1010 with a minimum grade of C-

Co-rerequisites

Affiliation with Snow College Honors Program

Fine Arts (FA)

This is an introductory course for non-art majors in which students will learn to understand and appreciate art through the study of the visual language and art history. This course presents the fundamentals of the creative process, including structure, concept, material proficiency, and historical context. Emphasis is placed on developing the student's ability to critically analyze artistic works.

This studio course is an introduction to the dynamics of the visual language through the communicative means of drawing. This course is specifically designed for students not pursuing a career in art. The focus of this course is to provide the student with an appreciation for drawing through the development of observational drawing skills, employing a wide range of traditional mediums. Fundamental techniques, consistent in historic and contemporary artistic practices, will be stressed. No prior drawing experience necessary. A lab fee is required.

This general education course is designed for non-art major students who wish to expand their creative ability, sensibility, and vocabulary in the visual arts. Course content will introduce students to the visual language through lectures and discussion of history, theory, and criticism with an emphasis on the creation of art through a series of hands-on studio projects. Students will be exposed to studio practices in various types of two-dimensional media, including, but not limited to, drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, and digital media. A lab fee is required.

Basic Photography is a general education course designed for non-art major students who wish to expand their creative and technical ability in digital photography. Students will explore the meaning and making of images through lectures, discussion and camera work. Emphasis is placed on the development of creative expression and photography as a fine art medium. Topics include camera operation, light, image editing, formal aesthetics, historical perspectives, conceptual approaches, and exhibition presentation. DSLR camera and lab fee are required.

This is a practical and general course designed for students who desire to improve their speech efficiency, poise and self-confidence in public address situations. Special emphasis is placed on preparing, selecting, researching, organizing and delivering oral messages as well as on analyzing and evaluating the speaking-listening process.

Oral Interpretation of Literature is designed to introduce students to the art of performance and visual communication. It focuses on how to research and find literature with cultural significance that appeals to the audience and engages the performer through a theatrical, creative process. Students will develop the voice and performance techniques used for public performance and media presentations.

Photojournalism is a form of visual communication that documents the emotions, drama, suspense, and exhilaration of real-life events and people for diverse media outlets, including print and electronic media. As artists and storytellers, photojournalists create images that document our culture. These images capture both the momentous and the everyday circumstances of contemporary life and society. This course will teach students to understand photography as a form of visual communication, as they address aspects of photograph such as formal composition, narrative elements, aperture, shutter speed, power of color, dramatics of black/white, and more. The photographs taken in the course may be used for the school newspaper. DSLR camera is required.

This is both a movement-based and a lecture-based course that introduces students to the art form of dance through active exploration of its many components including ritual, movement, movement composition and performance. Movement-based prompts and games, combined with classroom discussions, will facilitate the exploration of the current state of dance as both a form of creative expression and a social, religious, and cultural practice. Throughout classroom sessions we will be exploring elements of a wide variety of dance styles including ballet, jazz, modern/contemporary technique and improvisation as a preparation for movement projects that are produced, choreographed and presented by students in the course.

This general education course acquaints students with the visual and technical language of Interior Design. Through education of the principles of design, this course will foster design sensibility as it is applied to residential space and structure. Emphasis will be placed on using space effectively, the selection and arrangement of furnishings and residential materials, and the application of relevant theory related to everyday living experiences. Students will create a comprehensive design portfolio and complete a client-based design project in order to demonstrate their competency in design and composition analysis, presentation/communication of design solutions, understanding of historical influences, creative thinking, and identification of effective design solutions. This course also introduces students to the professional aspects of a career in Interior Design.

A general appreciation course designed to make music meaningful to the average listener. The relationship of rhythm, melody, harmony, and form will be demonstrated though selected recordings. The elements of music will be treated non-technically together with historical and biographical observations. Western art music will be discussed as well as music of other world cultures. Also, a general survey of folk and popular music will be provided.

This course is a general music appreciation class designed to empower music listeners by giving them an understanding of American jazz and popular music. Students will develop analytical and listening skills that help them to identify and be able to seek and write about about jazz and popular music styles. This course fulfills the General Education requirement for Fine Arts.

This course provides students with an overview of the history of rock and roll music from its roots to the present day. Emphasis is placed on major stylistic trends and the artists who made major contributions to the evolution of this musical genre. Rock music will also be studied in a sociological context- both as an influence on, and as a reflection of the society in which it has operated. Fundamental musical concepts and vocabulary will also be addressed.

Students will perform concert band music selected by the instructor with technical accuracy and expressive musicality. Membership is open without audition. This course provides students with GE credit in the Fine Arts area.

This course involves participation in ensemble performances supporting Snow College athletic events. This course is repeatable for credit.

The course provides training and practical playing experience in a wide range of works for orchestra. Concerts and special programs are given throughout the year in which the students will be expected to participate. Audition required. This course is repeatable for credit.

Prerequisites

By audition and with permission of instructor

This course is an introduction to the literature, genre, conventions and style of drama as art and performance craft. It provides students with an overview of historical and contemporary theatrical practices.

An introduction to the elements of film, this course is designed to develop an appreciation and understanding of film as an art form. The class explores film criticism, film history, and film-making techniques through discussion and examination of historical and contemporary film.

This course is an introduction to terminology, improvisation, script analysis and interpretation, body movement, vocal production, acting techniques, and ensemble acting.

This course is an introduction to technical theater methods, scenic construction, sound operations, stage lighting, scene painting, and stage management. The course provides opportunity for both theoretical and practical experience in the various aspects of technical theater.

Foreign Language (FL)

This course is a continuation of CHIN 1010 and provides additional exposure to the Chinese language and the cultures of Chinese-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed CHIN 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Chinese in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Chinese at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in Chinese, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.

Prerequisites

CHIN 1010 or equivalent or permission of instructor

This course is a continuation of FREN 1010 and provides additional exposure to the French language and the cultures of French-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed FREN 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use French in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write French at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in French, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.

Prerequisites

FREN 1010 or equivalent

FREN 2020 is part two of the two-course sequence in intermediate French at Snow College. It is for students who have completed FREN 2010 (or its equivalent) or three to four years of high school French. During the course students explore various themes in different French-speaking cultures. They focus on vocabulary development, accuracy of expression, and increased communication strategies. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.

Prerequisites

FREN 2010 or equivalent

This course is a continuation of ITAL 1010 and provides additional exposure to the Italian language and the cultures of Italian-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed ITAL 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Italian in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Italian at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in Italian, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.

Prerequisites

ITAL 1010 or equivalent

This course is a continuation of JAPN 1010 and provides additional exposure to the Japanese language and the cultures of Japanese-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed JAPN 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Japanese in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Japanese at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in Japanese, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.

Prerequisites

JAPN 1010 or equivalent or permission of instructor

This course is a continuation of KORE 1010 and provides additional exposure to the Korean language and the cultures of Korean-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed KORE 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Korean in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Korean at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in Korean, and additional focus on reading and writing.

Prerequisites

KORE 1010 or equivalent or permission of instructor

This course is a continuation of SPAN 1010 and provides additional exposure to the Spanish language and the cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed SPAN 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Spanish in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Spanish at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in Spanish, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.

Prerequisites

SPAN 1010 or equivalent

This course reviews and expands upon the communicative aspects of the Spanish language acquired by students in SPAN 1010 and SPAN 1020, by employing three main areas of focus: linguistics, literature and film, and culture. The linguistic focus of the course is on vocabulary development, accuracy of expression, and improved communication. Students review structures and vocabulary learned in elementary courses and use them in longer, more detailed speech and compositions. The literary focus of the course is on the development of reading skills for authentic texts, from both print and other media. The cultural focus of the course is on increasing the knowledge and understanding of the geography, history, and traditions of the Hispanic world. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation in reading, speaking, listening, and writing in Spanish.

Prerequisites

SPAN 1020 or equivalent experience.

Co-rerequisites

None.

This course is a continuation of SPAN 2010. The goal of this course is to expand upon the communicative aspects of the Spanish language acquired by students in SPAN 2010, in writing, speaking, reading, and listening comprehension. Students continue to develop additional vocabulary improve accuracy of expression, and polish overall communication. Students learn structures beyond those acquired in elementary courses and use them in longer, more detailed speech and compositions. Students also augment their understanding of literature and sharpen their analytical skills through continued development of reading using authentic texts, including Spanish short stories and a dramatic Spanish play. They increase knowledge and understanding of the geography, history, and traditions of the Hispanic world.

Prerequisites

SPAN 2010 or equivalent experience

Foundations (FND)

In this course, we will study one thematic issue (e.g. cloning, GMOs, definitions of beauty) from three different disciplinary perspectives in order to understand ways in which knowledge is connected, dependent, and relevant. Additionally, this course will focus on the habits of mind (intellectual, motivational, emotional, self-awareness, and self-directedness) that are essential for becoming a learner in an interdisciplinary world. This course should be taken during the Freshman year. Additional fee required.

Humanities (HU)

This introductory course investigates principles of communication theories and how to use these theories in practical application. The course content encourages students to analyze, assess and evaluate communication principles. Students will develop skills and techniques essential to effective communication in settings that include; intrapersonal (with oneself), interpersonal (face-to-face), small group and public speaking. Students will develop the ability to look at the big picture of human communicate and how it affects each individual's perception, cultural traditions and human philosophy.

This course is an introduction into the nature of media and its relationship with the individual. The course teaches students to analyze, assess and evaluate popular culture, literature, and media. It includes a focus on various mediums including literature, radio, television, film, books, newspaper, and advertising to assist students in looking at the big picture of how media affects their perceptions.;

This course is designed to give students an appreciation of science fiction, a literary genre that is often overlooked by the literary establishment. The course examines the contemporary history of the genre using several representative texts.

This course is an integrative exploration of the intellectual traditions of the ancient and medieval Western world. The emphasis of the course is on reading seminal literary works, but introduces other interdisciplinary approaches such as art, architecture, philosophy, religion, and mathematics. It fulfills an HU general education requirement. This class is open to all students and fills an honors program requirement.

This course is an integrative exploration of Europe and America during the sixteenth through twenty-first centuries. The emphasis of the course is on reading entire seminal works in the history of western culture, and other interdisciplinary approaches might include art, music, philosophy, religion, and science. It fulfills an HU general education requirement. This class is open to all students and is a required core class in the Honors Program.

This course is an introduction to literary forms, to close reading of literature, and to the terminology of literature. The emphasis is on fiction, poetry, and drama. The course will emphasize literary traditions, historical time periods, diverse authors, careful reading, literary analysis, and thoughtful interpretation.

This course surveys literary texts that draw on oral traditions in their plots, characters, or language. The emphasis is on canonical and multicultural American literature, and the course also asks students to examine artistic aspects of oral storytelling.

This course is an introduction to fiction, primarily short stories and novels. The course will emphasize literary traditions, historical time periods, diverse authors, careful reading, literary analysis, and thoughtful interpretation.

This course explores myths and folktales of the world with an emphasis on Greco-Roman myths and tales. The course focuses on application of the myths to art, literature, and Western culture in general.

This course provides a critical approach to poetry's forms and developments, including historical trends and modern movements. Emphasis is on recognizing, understanding, and responding to poetry in all its forms.

Introduction to Creative Writing focuses on at least three different genres (i.e. fiction, poetry, graphic novels, or others) and guides students through the creative process, creative writing theory, and genre-specific writing techniques. Additionally, students will participate in workshopping their own writing projects. Because reading literature is so closely tied to writing literature, the class also includes analysis of literature, allowing students to read like a writer. ENGL 2250 is recommended as a preparatory class for genre-specific creative writing classes at Snow College.

Shakespeare remains one of the most popular playwrights in the English Language. Who is he?  Why is he considered so important?  What meaning did his works have in his own time?  Are they applicable to today's culture?  This course will examine these questions by examining a sampling of Shakespeare's plays and poetry from a variety of critical perspectives.

This course is an introduction to world literature of the 20th and 21st centuries, emphasizing literary texts from outside the Anglo-American traditional canon and that circulate worldwide. Special emphasis is placed on non-Western texts. The course will emphasize literary traditions, contemporary ideas and events, diverse authors, careful reading, literary analysis, and thoughtful interpretation.

This course is designed to introduce unique literary topics on a semester to semester basis. Gothic literature, Science Fiction literature, African American literature courses all began as English 2400 classes. The specific subject for any given semester will be shown in the class schedule.

This course is a regional study of literature of the American West. Areas of emphasis include Native Americans, mountain men, settlers, the cowboy myth hero, and the American frontier. Manifest Destiny and the multicultural nature of westward expansion will be emphasized in the course.

This course is a survey of literature addressing the experiences of people and their relationship with the natural environment. Encountering nature is a fundamental characteristic of human cultures and individuals. With the growing interest and importance of human relationships with the environment, the genres of natural history writing, experiential nature writing, and exploration and adventure writing have continued to flourish. This course is designed to help students become aware of the complexities of our relationship with the outdoors by surveying literature that deals with relevant themes.

This course explores Gothic and supernatural literature, with an emphasis on horror fiction, from 1764 to the present day. Works that have been studied in recent years include Frankenstein, Carmilla, The Tell-Tale Heart, and short stories by Stephen King. Themes that have been discussed include the sublime, sexual identity, and the nature of evil.

Introduction to Gender Studies investigates gender and gender identity, reflecting on how gender is identified and defined; how gender norms are established, maintained, and disrupted; and the role gender plays in both personal and social contexts. Students will be familiarized with gender theory. In addition, students will be introduced to the historical context surrounding gender studies, as well as key terms, movements, and thinkers within the field.

This course focuses on the contributions of African-American writers to the development of a multi-racial culture in America, and to the expression of the black experience through literature.

This course focuses on the development of ideas, movements, and genres in American literature from exploration and settlement to Romanticism as illustrated through representative texts.

This course focuses on the development of ideas, movements, and genres in American literature from Realism to the present as illustrated through representative texts.

This course surveys significant cultural ideas and currents of British literature from its beginnings through the Eighteenth Century as illustrated through representative texts.

The course focuses on the development of ideas, movement, and genres in British Literature from the Romantic era to the present as illustrated through representative texts.

We are all intimately familiar with at least one language: our own. Few native speakers, however, stop to consider what they know about their own language and how their language shapes daily life. This course will provide students with a basic introduction to language and the relationship of language to society. Examples will be taken from a wide variety of languages and cultures. This course is cross-listed with TESL 2650.

A general introduction to the theory of language, this course will focus on language systems, including how they exist in linguistic communities, with particular attention to phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Examples of general linguistic principles will be drawn from English as well as other languages. Cross-listed as TESL 2660.

This course is designed for honors students and focuses on interdisciplinary topics building off of a humanities-based platform. The specific subject for any given semester will be shown in the class schedule and course advertisement materials. While humanities-based class topics will vary from semester to semester, the course will emphasize issues and topics that can be studied by multiple academic disciplines.

This course is designed to help students better understand themselves and their relationship to the world by reading various points of view related to questions about morality, politics, religion, and approaches to truth.

The Foundation of Business Leadership course at Snow College explores the philosophical and moral factors that influence professional and institutional success. Using the humanities as a platform, it considers the diverse ways that business principles have been understood and applied across time and cultures. It examines ancient and modern ethical theory in an attempt to comprehend and challenge the moral underpinnings of successful leadership and business. This theoretical investigation is combined with a practical consideration of current case studies in contemporary business.

Prerequisites

Instructor's permission

This course is designed to help students explore personal morality by understanding ethical theories and their application to contemporary ethical issues.

Prerequisites

English 1010 C- or higher

This course is an introductory study of scripture, art, history, belief, and music of religions around the world. This study leads students to discover the values and culture of religious institutions. Students are strongly encouraged to complete ENGL 1010 and ENGL 2010 before taking this course.

Prerequisites

Students are strongly encouraged to complete ENGL 1010 and ENGL 2010 before taking this course.

We are all intimately familiar with at least one language: our own. Few native speakers, however, stop to consider what they know about their own language and how their language shapes daily life. This course will provide students with a basic introduction to language and the relationship of language to society. Examples will be taken from a wide variety of languages and cultures. This course is cross-listed with ENGL 2650.

A general introduction to the theory of language, this course will focus on language systems, including how they exist in linguistic communities, with particular attention to phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Examples of general linguistic principles will be drawn from English as well as other languages. Cross-listed as ENGL 2660.

Integrated Exploration (IE)

This course is an introduction to culture, theory, and practice associated with visual art. It will include visual arts orientation, readings, critical discussion, and research related to visual culture and meaning. Required of art majors. (Formerly Art Majors Orientation)

BUS 1270 is a pragmatic course that explores the theory and application of sales and customer service, with a focus on relationship building. Students will present multiple sales presentations based on strategies, theories, and best practices learned in class. The culmination of the course is a final sales presentation which provides an opportunity to apply what was learned throughout the term.

This course is designed for honors students and focuses on interdisciplinary topics. The specific subject for any given semester will be shown in the class schedule and course advertisement materials. While class topics will vary from semester to semester, the course will emphasize issues and topics that can be studied by multiple academic disciplines. This course is repeatable for credit.

This course provides a combination of theoretical background and technical aspects of leading and managing groups in a vertical environment and emphasizes hands-on skill development such as rope systems, anchors, rappelling and belaying, protection placement, lead climbing, site management, risk management, related emergency procedures, and Leave No Trace Outdoor Ethics. (An additional fee and field trips required.)

This course provides a combination of theoretical background and technical aspects of leading and managing groups in winter environments, highlighting avalanche awareness, while utilizing specialized hands-on skill development such as snowshoeing, skiing, and ice climbing. It will emphasize specialized clothing/equipment selection, care, and maintenance, equipment nomenclature, technical aspects of avalanche awareness and assessment, backcountry travel and route finding, risk management, and related beacon search and rescue procedures. (Additional fee and field trips required.)

This course provides a combination of theoretical background and technical aspects of leading and managing groups in a challenge environment and will emphasize hands-on skill development such as spotting/belaying, equipment management selection, and care, program design/sequencing, facilitation strategies, course design and maintenance, risk management, and related emergency procedures.

This course provides a combination of theoretical background and technical aspects of leading and managing groups in a water environment and will emphasize hands-on skill development such as equipment selection, care, and maintenance, equipment nomenclature, strokes, self and group rescues, reading and recognizing water features/hydrology, site management, risk management, and related emergency procedures. (Additional fee and field trips required.)

Life Science (LS)

General biology is a fundamental course in the underlying principles of life to include the method of obtaining knowledge (scientific method), molecular components of cellular structures and their functions, genetics and speciation, diversity of living organisms with surveys of the three domains and eukaryote kingdoms, and an introduction to ecology and the role of humankind in the biosphere.

Human Biology is the study of the human species at the levels of organization from the atomic through the biosphere. Emphasis is placed on the major organ systems, health issues, genetics, evolution, and man's interaction with the environment as related to the biology of humans and the quality of life. This course is for students whose major course of study is not in the sciences. This course will partially satisfy the Natural Science GE requirement (LS). While not required, it is recommended that Biol 1055 (Human Biology Lab) is taken concurrently.

Environmental biology examines the varied dimensions of environmental issues, problems and solutions in the context of the biological sciences. To understand global environmental biology issues, students will become fluent in topics including biodiversity, ecosystem function, agriculture and food production, energy systems, water, urbanization, population dynamics, air quality, and climate. The course consists of lectures, participation exercises, and the application assignments (in-class and field based)--all of which will require critical thinking and data analysis skills.

Human Dynamics for Visual Artists and Performers is designed primarily for students interested in the human figure and its form and function as it relates to drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, dance, and athletics. The focus of the course is primarily on the musculoskeletal system, but includes the study of the human species at levels of organization from the atomic through the biosphere with the study of cell biology, major organ systems, genetics, human development, evolution, and ecology. It must be taken concurrently with the laboratory, BIOL 1455.

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 1455

Birds, Biology, and Learning and Teaching the Story of Life examines the biology of birds, compares it to human biology, and explores how to teach the biology of birds to children in the classroom and at home. To understand bird biology, students will become fluent in topics including bird classification, how to identify birds by sight and song, citizen science in the home and the classroom, bird conservation, teaching bird biology, and how bird anatomy and physiology compares to that of humans. The course consists of lectures, participation exercises, and application assignments (in-class and field-based) - all of which will require critical thinking and data analysis.

This course introduces the scientific method, cell chemistry, cell structure and function, gene action and genetics, natural selection and mechanisms of speciation, the origin of life, diversity of living organisms and classification, and surveys of viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi, and the human immune system. This is the first semester course of a year-long sequence that is required for most biology majors, many pre-professional majors, natural resource majors and some agriculture majors.

Prerequisites

It is recommended that the student will have successfully completed high school biology and chemistry.

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 1615

This course introduces major phyla and classes of the Chromista, red algae, green algae, plants, and animals through the study of structure/function relationships, reproductive mechanisms, adaptations, and evolutionary development, physiology, ecology, and human importance. This is the second semester course of a year long sequence that is required for most biology majors, many preprofessional majors, Natural Resource majors, and some Agriculture majors.

Prerequisites

BIOL 1610 and 1615, or instructor

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 1625

Introductory Microbiology surveys the fundamental biological processes observed in bacteria and microorganisms with emphasis placed on their beneficial and harmful activities related to humans and other organisms. Molecular genetics and biotechnology are introduced. It must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2065.

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 2060 must be taken concurrently with the Laboratory BIOL 2065.

This general microbiology course is designed for those with a basic understanding of biology and chemistry. The course will cover the morphology, reproduction, metabolism, microbial and molecular genetics, biotechnology, ecology, and diversity of microorganisms. An emphasis will be placed on bacteria, viruses, fungi, protists, and their role in the environment and human disease. The lecture must be taken concurrently with the lab BIOL 2205. Courses must be taken together to satisfy the Life Science GE requirement.

Prerequisites

CHEM 1210 or CHEM 1110 and BIOL 1610 or BIOL 2420, or instructor permission

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 2205

This course is a comprehensive study of the structure of the human body. It is designed primarily for students preparing for careers in nursing, physical therapy, and other health care fields. It must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2325. Lecture and lab sections must be the same. For example, if a student enrolls in BIOL 2320.001, that student must enroll in BIOL 2325.001.

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 2325

Scientific Foundations of Nutrition is designed to introduce students to the science of human nutrition and inspire personal application of the principles taught. Concepts to be studied include the basic nutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and water), their chemical composition, digestion, metabolism, physiological function, dietary recommendations, food sources, and deficiency and toxicity symptoms. Obesity, weight management, energy balance, and food and water safety will also be covered.

Life Science Lab (LB)

This laboratory setting allows students to physically examine domestic animal tissues, organs, and systems.

Co-rerequisites

AGBS 2200

The general biology laboratory component allows for student application of the principles learned in general biology lecture with an emphasis on investigative learning. This component (BIOL 1015) is optional, but in order to count as a laboratory experience, it must be taken concurrently with BIOL 1010. (Lab fee required)

Co-rerequisites

The laboratory BIOL 1015 must be taken concurrently with the lecture BIOL 1010.

The human biology laboratory component allows for student application of the principles learned in human biology lecture with an emphasis on investigative learning. This component (BIOL 1055) is optional, but in order to count as a laboratory experience, it must be taken concurrently with BIOL 1050.

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 1050

The environmental biology laboratory allows students hands-on application and experimentation of principles taught during environmental biology lecture. This component (BIOL 1425) is optional, but in order to count as a laboratory experience, it must be taken concurrently with BIOL 1420. (Lab fee required).

Co-rerequisites

The laboratory BIOL 1425 must be taken concurrently with the lecture BIOL 1420.

This course is the laboratory component of BIOL 2150 and gives students the opportunity to study laboratory models, skeletal material, and cadavers. It must be taken concurrently with the lecture, BIOL 1450.

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 1450

This course is the laboratory component of Bird Biology, BIOL 1460 and gives students the opportunity to study birds in the laboratory and the field. It must be taken concurrently with BIOL 1460.

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 1460

The Biology I laboratory component allows for student application of the principles learned in Biology I lecture with an emphasis on investigative learning and collaboration. (Lab fee required)

Prerequisites

It is recommended that the student will have successfully completed high school biology and chemistry.

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 1610

The Biology II laboratory component allows for student application of the principles learned in the Biology II lecture course with an emphasis on investigative learning and collaboration. (Lab fee required)

Prerequisites

BIOL 1610 and 1615, or instructor

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 1620

This laboratory course allows for student experimentation and application of principles learned in the Introductory Genetics lecture course. (Lab fee required)

Prerequisites

Any biology core course such as BIOL 1010, 1050, 1610, etc. or instructor

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 2030

The laboratory component will involve hands-on experience in microscopy, staining methods, aseptic technique, media preparation, sterilization, maintenance of cultures, microbial identification, molecular biology and enumeration methods. The lab must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2200. (Lab fee required)

Prerequisites

CHEM 1210 or CHEM 1110 and BIOL 1610 or BIOL 2420, or instructor

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 2200

This course is the laboratory component of Human Anatomy (BIOL 2320). It gives students the opportunity to study models, skeletal material, and cadavers. It must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2320.

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 2320

The laboratory portion of human physiology provides hands-on exercises that reinforce the major topics covered in the lecture portion of the course. This course must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2420. (Lab fee required)

Prerequisites

Strongly recommended BIOL 2320, CHEM 1110 or 1210

Co-rerequisites

BIOL 2425 must be taken concurrently with the lecture, BIOL 2420

Oral Communication (OC)

The study of interpersonal communication is the study of interaction between people. It is not only the conversation, but the study of relationships, problems, and situations and how they can be dealt with in an effective manner. This course is designed to study interpersonal communication from a descriptive as well as analytical point of view. The topics of interpersonal relationships, self-concept, perception, emotions, verbal and nonverbal language, listening, intimacy, climate, and conflict will be discussed. Possible methods of enhancing interpersonal communication situations will be practiced through discussion, role play, writing, critical evaluation, feedback and observance.

This course introduces the various perspectives on organizational communication, as manifested in the theories, principles, and practices which predominate in modern organizations. Special emphasis is placed on preparing and organizing various types of oral presentations and communication strategies for organizations.

This course introduces various perspectives on public relations, as manifested in the theories, methods, principles, and practices which predominate in the field. Special emphasis is placed on preparing and organizing various types of oral presentations appropriate to the field.

This course is an exploration of spontaneous movement and expression through improvisation. Students will explore individual and group creativity, timing, inventiveness, discovery of emotion, and thought processes. The course provides opportunity for both theoretical and practical experiences in the various aspects of movement improvisation, presentation, research and structure in vocal delivery. Repeatable for credit.

Physical Education (PE)

Fitness and Wellness is a course that will help increase student awareness of the need for a lifetime fitness and wellness program. Students will develop programs and participate in activities to help them implement a lifetime commitment to fitness and wellness.

Physical Science (PS)

This course introduces individuals to a variety of chemistry-related knowledge and experience and is designed to give non-majors a glimpse at chemistry and how it relates to the world around them. As a general education course, it relates chemistry to the real world experience and gives the student an opportunity to investigate chemical principles in their life. It gives the student a feeling for how scientists view problems and the systematic method by which they solve them. Discussion topics are chosen from physical, organic, and biological areas inside the chemistry field.

Prerequisites

MATH 0850 or equivalent

This course introduces individuals to a variety of chemistry-related knowledge and experience. As a general education course, it relates chemistry to the real world experience and gives the student an opportunity to investigate chemical principles in their life. The course serves as a prerequisite to programs related to allied health such as nursing, economics, biology, natural resources, and others. The course also serves as a preparatory course for general chemistry. Some topics in the course are atomic structure, chemical calculations, energy and matter, gas laws, nuclear chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry.

Prerequisites

MATH 0850 or above

Co-rerequisites

CHEM 1115 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory

This course is designed to teach chemical theory and principles as they are applied to present day chemistry.; Topics covered in this course include atomic theory, gas laws, thermochemistry, molecular bonding, reaction chemistry, etc.; This course is for students majoring in programs such as chemistry, physics, geology, biology, engineering and pre-medical areas who will take additional chemistry courses.

Prerequisites

Math 1050, equivalent, or concurrently enrolled in Math 1050

Co-rerequisites

Chem 1215

This course is a continuation of CHEM 1210.; The principles of equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, and solution chemistry are applied to present-day chemistry.; This course is for students in the natural sciences such as Chemistry, Physics, Biology, engineering, and Pre-medical areas who will take additional chemistry courses.

Prerequisites

a grade of C- or higher in CHEM 1210

Co-rerequisites

CHEM 1225

This course is a study of the earth, its materials, its surface processes, internal processes and a brief account of earth's history.

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

Co-rerequisites

GEO 1015

This course is an introduction to the principles of geology as observed and studied in the national parks of a selected area. Designed for non-science majors. 3-4 weekend field trips or an approximately 2-week field trip will be required. A class fee is required to partially cover field trip expenses.

This course is a study of the geological processes that affect or are affected by human activity such as earthquakes, volcanic hazards, flooding, waste, mineral and energy resources. This course is designed for non-majors. A field trip may be required.

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

Co-rerequisites

GEO 1065

This course is an introduction to physical geology. It includes an introduction to the materials and composition of the earth and the physical processes, both internal and external, that shape the earth. A field trip may be required.

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 or equivalent, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

Co-rerequisites

GEO 1115

This course is an introduction to geographic analysis of the processes that operate in the earth's atmosphere (such as weather, winds, ocean currents, climate, and vegetation) and on the earth's surface (such as rivers, glaciers, wind, waves). This course is designed for non-majors and majors. (A field trip may be required.)

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

This course is an introduction to geographic analysis of the processes that operate in the earth s atmosphere (such as weather, winds, ocean currents, climate, and vegetation) and on the earth s surface (such as rivers, glaciers, wind, waves). This course is designed for non-majors and majors. A field trip may be required.

Prerequisites

Math 1010 competency

This course is designed to give non-majors a glimpse at physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, and astronomy, and how they relate to the world around them. It does this by using a conceptual approach to and demonstrations of the most significant and universal laws and models describing the physical world. The course also shows how the different disciplines in the physical sciences overlap and contribute to each other.

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 or equivalent

PHSC 2100 is a study of how modern physical science has evolved, including content from fields such as physics, astronomy, geology, and chemistry. The course looks at science from an historical perspective; science as a process is emphasized over science as a body of facts. This class is taught in an interdisciplinary seminar format with class discussions, presentations, and term papers. It is recommended that you enroll in PHSC 2105 concurrently.

Prerequisites

Math 0900 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

PHYS 1010 is a general one semester physics course with a laboratory. This course is designed for nonscience majors and fulfills the general education requirements in physical science. The fundamental principles of physics with emphasis on how a problem is approached and solved are central to the course. Topics include Newton's Laws, gravity, momentum, energy thermodynamics, waves, electricity, optics, and nuclear physics.

Prerequisites

Math 0850 or MATH 0900 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

Co-rerequisites

Elementary Physics Laboratory (PHYS 1015)

This is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the night sky and the laws of science that govern heavenly bodies. The question How do we know? will lead students to learn more about stars, galaxies, and the universe itself. Application of physical laws and mathematical solutions to a variety of problems will lead to an understanding of how we know. Regularly scheduled night observations will be held each week. Naked eye observation and binocular observation will be emphasized with some use of telescopes. (Lab fee required)

Prerequisites

MATH 0850 or MATH 0900 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

This is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with profound questions about the existence of life. How and why did our existence become possible? Are these conditions necessary for life in general? Could we find life elsewhere in the universe? Where and how should we look? This class includes elements of geology, chemistry, astronomy, and physics. (Class fee required)

Prerequisites

MATH 0850 or MATH 1010 (or equivalent) with a C or better, or ACT math score 21 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

PHYS 1130 is an introductory course in the science of meteorology. The student is exposed to the physical, chemical, and dynamic processes of the atmosphere. Scientific principles that govern the circulation of the atmosphere, heat imbalance, radiation, cloud formation,weather prediction, severe weather, fronts, halos, and rainbows are analyzed. The course considers weather hazards and patterns common to Utah and the local region. Historical weather events are also evaluated in their respective spatial and temporal context.

Prerequisites

Math 0850 or MATH 1010 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

Co-rerequisites

PHYS 1135 - Introduction to Meteorology Laboratory

PHYS 1750 is a general education physical science course intended for music majors but open to all majors. Major topics will include the science of acoustics including properties of waves and wave phenomena, aural sound perception through hearing, and the production of sound with musical instruments. Each class of instrument and the physical properties will be examined along with musical scales and harmony.

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 or MATH 0850 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT math score 21 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

Co-rerequisites

The Science of Sound and Music Laboratory (PHYS 1755)

Physical Science Lab (LB)

This is a hands-on laboratory experience that accompanies the CHEM 1010 course. It is designed to give students a feel for basic laboratory equipment and measurement. It also provides reinforcement of the concepts covered in the class. The lab also enables students to visualize many concepts and experiments discussed in class.

Prerequisites

MATH 0850 or equivalent

This is a general inorganic and organic chemistry laboratory which reinforces the fundamental facts, theories and laws of chemistry through laboratory experiences. (It is designed for students in home economics, nursing, physical therapy, some areas of biology, forestry and agriculture, as well as other related health sciences.) Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1110 is required. A lab fee is required.

Prerequisites

MATH 0850, 0900 or equivalent

Co-rerequisites

CHEM 1110

This course is an introduction to the chemistry laboratory as it applies to present day chemistry.; This chemistry lab course is to be taken concurrently with CHEM 1210. (Lab fee required)

Prerequisites

High School Chemistry or College Chemistry course with a lab, and Math 1050

Co-rerequisites

Chem 1210, concurrent enrolement in or completion of Math 1050

This chemistry lab course is to be taken concurrently with CHEM 1220.; This course is designed to give students experience with lab experiments related to kinetics, acid-base chemistry, qualitative analysis, electrochemistry, polymers, and introduce basic synthesis techniques and crystal field theory. (Lab fee required)

Prerequisites

CHEM 1210 and CHEM 1215

Co-rerequisites

CHEM 1220

The Survey of Geology lab component allows for student application of the principles learned in Survey of Geology lecture.; It also teaches students skills necessary to apply these principles.; There is an emphasis on investigative learning.; In this course students will learn how to identify and interpret common minerals, rocks and fossils. In addition, students will learn to read and interpret topographic and geologic maps, aerial and satellite photos, and interpret landforms, geologic history and resources on these maps and photos. (Additional fee required)

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 or higher,, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

Co-rerequisites

GEO 1010

In this course students will learn the skills necessary to assess geologic hazards, resources and waste.; These skills include identification of rocks and interpretation of aerial photographs and topographic and geologic maps.; Students will investigate various geologic hazards, contamination of water and air, and geologic resources. (Additional fee required)

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

Co-rerequisites

GEO 1060

In this course students will learn how to identify common minerals and rocks, read and interpret topographic and geologic maps and aerial photographs. The course is designed for geology majors, related majors and others interested. (Lab fee required)

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

Co-rerequisites

GEO 1110

This course is a practical application of the principles of physical geography such as identification of geographic processes and their results using maps and aerial photographs, and quantitative techniques such as measuring humidity, sun angle. (Lab fee required)

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.

This laboratory class is designed to enhance the learning in the interdiscipinary physical science course (PHSC 1000).; It provides hands on experiments in the physical sciences with emphasis in physics, chemistry, earth science, and space. (Lab fee required)

Co-rerequisites

PHSC 1000

This course counts as a physical science lab credit for students enrolled in the physical science class in the Honors Program: PHSC 2100. Students will do selected elementary experiments in physics, chemistry, geology, or astronomy. (Lab fee required)

Co-rerequisites

PHSC 2100

PHYS 1015 is a laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1010. Students will learn techniques of measurement and data analysis. Principles from the lecture course will be demonstrated and tested. (Lab fee required)

Co-rerequisites

Elementary Physics (PHYS 1010)

PHYS 1135 is a laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1130. Students will learn techniques of measurement and data analysis. Principles from the lecture course will be demonstrated and tested. (Lab fee required)

Co-rerequisites

Introduction to Meteorology (PHYS 1130)

PHYS 1755 is a laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1750. Students will learn techniques of measurement and data analysis. Music principles from the lecture course will be demonstrated and students will perform experiments to analyze properties of waves, sound perception, and the tonal qualities of musical instruments. (Lab fee required.)

Prerequisites

NA

Co-rerequisites

The Science of Sound and Music (PHYS 1750)

Quantitative Literacy (MA)

This course provides an introduction to mathematical modeling and problem solving utilizing algebra, discrete mathematics, geometry and statistics. Furthermore, students will examine some of the greatest ideas of humankind ideas comparable to the works of Shakespeare, Plato, and Michelangelo. Imagination, creativity, and sound logic will all be crucial components of these mathematical explorations. The overarching theme of the course is to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for math and its many applications to the world around us. There are three basic goals for this course: To attain a better understanding of some rich mathematical ideas; To build sharper skills for analyzing life issues that transcend mathematics; To develop a new perspective and outlook on the way you view the world.

Prerequisites

Math 0850 or Math 1010 with a C or better course grade, ACT math score 21 or higher or appropriate placement test score.

Introduction to Statistics is an elementary introduction to the nature of statistical reasoning. Topics to be covered include descriptive statistics, sampling and data collection, basic probability, sampling distribution, and introduction to inference including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 preferred).

Prerequisites

Math 850 or Math 1010 with a C or better course grade, ACT math score 22 or higher or appropriate placement test score.

In this course students will study polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Additional topics include sequences and series, conic sections, matrices, the binomial theorem, modeling, and graphing technology. This course prepares students for trigonometry and calculus.

Prerequisites

MATH 1010 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT Math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or student must (re-)take placement test.

This course will cover trigonometric functions, definitions, radian measure, graphs, solving trigonometric equations, vectors, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines,complex numbers, polar coordinates. Graphing calculator required.

Prerequisites

A grade of C or better in Math 1010, ACT math score 23 or higher or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or student must (re-) take placement test.

In this course students will study polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, relations, and applications.; Additional topics include sequences and series, conic sections, matrices, the binomial theorem, modeling, and graphing technology. This course prepares students for calculus.

Prerequisites

A grade of B or higher in Math 1010 or equivalent, an ACT score of 25 or higher, or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or student must (re-) take placement test.

Science Inquiry (SI)

This class is a study of the anatomy of domestic animals and the functions of the various systems. Each system is studied separately with emphasis on the skeletal, circulatory, digestive and reproductive systems.

Co-rerequisites

AGBS 2205

This course is a study of biological thought. It is approached through the reading and discussion of current and classic literature in biology and through interaction with professions in the life sciences.

Prerequisites

Any general education or majors biology class.

Co-rerequisites

Any general education or majors biology class.

This course is intended to expose students to the computer science discipline. This course covers a broad range of foundational topics such as programming, algorithms, the Internet, big data, digital privacy and security, and the societal impacts of computing. There are hands-on activities in the computer lab, but this is not a skills course or an in-depth programming course.

Prerequisites

ENGL 1010 and MATH 1050

This course is designed for honors students and focuses on interdisciplinary topics. The specific subject for any given semester will be shown in the class schedule and course advertisement materials. While class topics willvary from semester to semester, the course will emphasize issues and topics that can be studied by multiple academic disciplines, and the class will be designed to meet the requirements for Science Inquiry GE credit.

Social and Behavioral Science (SS)

This course introduces students to the four basic fields of Anthropology consisting of Physical Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, Archaeology, and Linguistic Anthropology. Anthropologists seek to understand what it means to be human by examining the physical and cultural factors that have influenced the origin, development, and behavior of humankind. Both general education credit and variable credit may be earned. To fulfill Social Science general education requirements, the class must be taken for 3 credits; however, 1-2 variable elective credits are offered for exigent circumstances.

This is an introductory course in human relations principles and skills applicable to management effectiveness, career success, and personal relationships. Theories and methods of organizational behavior, professionalism, motivation, team building, conflict resolution, leadership, negotiation, cultural differences, and personal communication are discussed. Practical application and development of skills in these areas are emphasized throughout the course. Successful completion of the course satisfies the Social and Behavior Science General Education requirement.

This course will introduce personal and consumer financial concepts and give students basic tools to make sound financial decisions in today's society based on economic trends and research.A This is a practical course in personal money management consisting of financial planning including career choices, budgeting, planning for retirement, financing a home and automobile, and understandingA consumer credit,A taxes, insurance, and investments. Students will use basic math skills as well as read, write, and think critically.Note: This course is cross-listed as HFST 1210 and meets general education requirements for Social and Behavioral Science.

This course will explore the history, processes, and functions of the American Criminal Justice System this will include law enforcement, the courts, corrections, and the basic theories and procedures of criminal justice in America and its impact on Human Behavior.

Intercultural Communication is a study of the ways people communicate within and between cultures, including a consideration of cultural contexts and the relationship between culture and communication. This class is aimed at developing a greater understanding about diversity and the intercultural aspect of everyday life. Intercultural diversity is present everywhere and understanding some of the cultural influence helps individuals gain acceptance and tolerance of other cultures.

This course is designed to provide students an introduction into economics. This course teaches students economic principles and theories that undergird our economic system and how these principles and theories influence economic realities markets and society. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Social and Behavioral Science General Education requirement at Snow College.

This course is designed to provide students an introduction to the principles of microeconomics. This course teaches students microeconomic principles and theories that are the basis for economic behavior and economic systems with the primary focus on the U.S. market system. Students examine how these principles and theories influence economic reality in markets and society. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Social and Behavioral Science General Education requirement at Snow College.

This course is a study of the major geographical regions of the world, emphasizing the interrelationships between environment and human imprints. The course focuses on the following issues and problems: distribution of cultural characteristics such as population, migration, language, religion, social customs, political and economic geography, urban patterns and settlements, agriculture, industry and resources. Physical geography concepts are also used to explain spatial patterns of cultural features.

This course will introduce personal and consumer financial concepts and give students basic tools to make sound financial decisions in today's society based on economic trends and research.This is a practical course in personal money management consisting of financial planning including career choices, budgeting, planning for retirement, financing a home and automobile, and understanding consumer credit, taxes, insurance, and investments. Students will use basic math skills as well as read, write, and think critically.Note: This course is cross-listed as BUS 1210 and meets general education requirements for Social and Behavioral Science.

This course is designed to help students understand and apply the research and literature which attempts to identify the principles, skills, and theories that help lead to successful marriages and families.

In this course students learn about the fundamental principles of growth and development from conception through childhood to old age. The course includes the study of the biological process of development, as well as the emotional, social, psychological, and cognitive development of the individual within a cultural and historical context. This course is cross-listed with Psychology 1100.

This course provides students with a realistic, engaging, personally relevant, and academically informative introduction to the study of intimate relationships, marriage, and families. The course discusses family theory (family systems theory, structure function theory, exchange theory, conflict theory, family development theory etc.), using examples taken from contemporary literature, professional journals, and film.

This course explores the history of the world from the earliest times into the 14th century. Emphasis is placed on the cultural and intellectual aspects of both Western and non-Western civilizations which established the foundations for their subsequent historical developments.

This course explores the history of the World from the European Renaissance into the 21st century. Emphasis is placed on the political, cultural, and intellectual developments over the past six centuries on a global scale. Attention is paid to the commonalities, uniqueness, and interaction between Western and non-Western civilizations.

This course focuses on outdoor leadership by introducing and exposing students to the history and various theories of outdoor leadership principles, practices, and ethics. Emphasis is also placed on implementation, evaluation and transference of leadership characteristics beyond an outdoor environment. Students apply leadership skills while planning and implementing a three-day outdoor adventure to be carried out during the semester.

This course offers an introductory survey of general psychology theories and concepts with an emphasis on the scientific study of human behaviors and applications in daily life.

In this course students learn about the fundamental principles of growth and development from conception through childhood to old age. The course includes the study of the biological process of development, as well as the emotional, social, cognitive, and psychological development of the individual within a cultural and historical context. This course is cross-listed with HFST 1500.

This course introduces students to the discipline of sociology and its unifying objective of linking broad cultural and institutional social forces to personal experiences and human behavior. Using sociological theories and research methods, an examination will be given to diverse sociological perspectives and topics such as culture, family, gender, ethnicity, crime, etc. General education credit and variable credit may be earned. To fulfill social science general education requirements, the class must be taken for 3 credits; however 1-2 variable elective credits are offered for exigent circumstances.

This course is a contemporary study of social problems in society. Origins, challenges and solutions connected to controversial issues such as drug abuse, crime, violence, prejudice, and poverty will be examined critically using sociological perspectives, concepts, and theories. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding and linking causes and effects of wider social forces and problems to personal life experiences. General education credit and variable credit may be earned. To fulfill Social Science general education requirements, the class must be taken for 3 credits; however 1-2 variable elective credits are offered for exigent circumstances.