Courses

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


ACCT 1200 Basic Income Tax Preparation
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This is a service learning course designed to give students an introduction to basic income tax preparation and related careers. The course design is based on the Internal Revenue Service?s Voluntary Income Tax Assistance program (VITA). Students will learn about and become certified in income tax preparation. With the acquired knowledge students will prepare income tax forms for members of the community who seek assistance from the VITA program.


ACCT 2010 Financial Accounting
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to accounting concepts and techniques, which are essential to administration of a business enterprise. The course further covers periodic determination of income and financial position by teaching students to maintain financial records and prepare and analyze financial reports. This course is the first in a series designed for the Sophomore year in preparation for obtaining the ASB degree.
Prerequisites: MATH 1050 or Equivalent


ACCT 2020 Managerial Acccounting
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is a continuation of ACCT 2010 exploring accounting concepts and techniques which are essential to administration of a business. The course primarily focuses on internal management uses of accounting information in planning, budgeting, controlling, and decision making in business operations.
Prerequisites: ACCT 2010


AGBS 1010 Fundamentals of Animal Science
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: The historical perspective and importance of animal production will be examined relative to time, society and geographical location. The contribution of animal production and related food products to our society will be covered. Scientific selection, breeding, feeding and management will be studied as they relate to efficiency of production of the various farm animals and consumer demand.


AGBS 1100 Career Exploration in Agribusiness
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This class introduces students to a variety of agriculture careers in agribusiness, production, public and private service, and sales and marketing opportunities related to agriculture. Emphasis will be on opportunities in the western United States. A variety of guest lecturers will present real-world insight into various careers. Students will also develop their own professional letter of application and resume.


AGBS 1420 Livestock Production Practices
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: Agriculture livestock production enterprises will be examined and production practices and production facilities investigated.A Students will be exposed to a variety of production, processing and marketing methods, both traditional and entrepreneurial, in the fields of beef, dairy, poultry, sheep, goat, and horse animal agriculture.A


AGBS 1700 Western Riding Skills I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: The objective of this class is to allow students to practice and further develop their horsemanship skills. This course is designed to cover principles of basic horsemanship and will include some of the principles of schooling/training horses that are already broke to ride. An understanding of horse behavior and safe conduct around horses are central to the course. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of riding, handling and grooming, as well as becoming familiar with the parts of the horse. Students have the opportunity for hands-on application of these principles by actually riding and schooling horses during this course. Topics presented will include horsemanship skills, equine behavior, equine psychology, and how this knowledge can be utilized to produce and present a willing, useful horse. Goals will be set for each student-horse pair, and efforts will be made to reach these goals. Students must have or arrange for their own horse.


AGBS 1900 Horsebreaking and Training I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course introduces fundamental principles and techniques used in starting and training young horses. It covers safety, equipment, handling principles, and techniques through practical application. Students will begin this course with a horse that has never been ridden. They will learn and apply techniques on this horse to take him from halter broke to riding under the saddle. Students must have or make arrangements to have their own horse.


AGBS 1997 Agriculture Internship
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:-3:1-3)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on, field-based work experiences in agriculture. Internships provide an opportunity for students to link theory with practice. Internships are also designed to help students network with professionals increasing their opportunities to receive full-time employment after graduation and provide resume worthy experience. Internships can introduce students to multiple professions within the broad field of agriculture, helping them narrow down their specific areas of interest early on in their college experience. Internships are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the workplace. Internships can be paid or volunteer with a business, organization, or government agency and are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with an agriculture faculty member and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Each credit requires 45 clock hours of internship experience. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.


AGBS 2020 Introduction to Agricultural Economics & AgriBusiness Management
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course will introduce students to important aspects of the agricultural economy, its structure and function, how agricultural markets work, the impact of public policy on agriculture economics, and the relationship between agribusiness and agriculture economics.
Corequisites: N/A


AGBS 2030 Managerial Analysis and Decision Making
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Using agricultural management software, students will apply management skills to actual agricultural businesses through analysis of real financial and production records. Students will determine a business's strengths and weaknesses and develop recommendations for improving the sustainability of the business. Through presentations from actual business owners, students will see the effect of implementing planned changes on a business. Students will participate in developing a business plan for an agricultural business. AGBS 2020 is a prerequisite for this course, or instructor approval must be given.
Prerequisites: AGBS 2020
Corequisites: N/A


AGBS 2200 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Science Inquiry (SI)
Description: This class is a study of the anatomy of domestic animals and the functions of the various systems. Each system is studied separately with emphasis on the skeletal, circulatory, digestive and reproductive systems.
Corequisites: AGBS 2205


AGBS 2205 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: This laboratory setting allows students to physically examine domestic animal tissues, organs, and systems.
Corequisites: AGBS 2200


AGBS 2400 Livestock Feeds and Feeding
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: Students will study the differences in digestive tracts of farm animals and the related digestive physiology. The composition of feeds and their uses are analyzed and ration balancing is practiced. Least cost rations are balanced for farm animals and pets using a pencil, a calculator and computer.


AGBS 2500 Applied Animal Reproduction & Breeding
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This course introduces students to animal reproduction. The course will cover the anatomy, function and regulation of livestock animal's reproductive cycle. Breeding systems and processes, including artificial insemination, embryo transfer, semen evaluation and collection, synchronization, pregnancy diagnosis, parturition and lactation, will be covered. Students will be introduced to genetic selection principles and methods of genetic and production measurement for the improvement of livestock.


AGBS 2700 Western Riding Skills II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course is designed for the intermediate rider and will allow students to further practice and develop riding skills. Students will concentrate on improving control and execution of aids, collection and control, and interpreting horse behavior. Students will also be introduced to more advanced equitation maneuvers and patterns as they are encouraged to develop skills useful for training and showing horses.Instruction will review and improve knowledge and skills in barn safety, horse health care, and riding techniques. There will be mounted as well as un-mounted (classroom) lessons. Students must have or arrange for their own horse.
Prerequisites: Western Riding & Horsemanship I


AGBS 2900 Horse Breaking and Training II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course introduces more advanced principles and techniques used in starting and training young horses. It covers safety, equipment, handling principles, and techniques through practical application. Students will begin this course with a horse that was either used in the Horse Breaking & Training I course or with a horse that has no more than 30 days riding time. They will learn and apply techniques on this horse to take him from beginning riding under the saddle to work or competition suitable and marketable for sale. Students must provide or have access to their own horse.; ;
Prerequisites: Horse Breaking & Training I


AGTM 1050 Farm Machinery Maintenance, Management and Operation
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course prepares students to analyze the factors that comprise safe machinery management and operation, and to explain the function of various machines and mechanisms. Students will learn machinery operation, farm machinery safety, procedures for diagnosing machinery problems, and processes for making machinery management decisions.


AGTM 1210 Small Engines Power Systems
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: Students will apply principles and techniques of small engine power systems used in the agricultural industry, particularly agricultural production. Proper use of tools, equipment, and safety will be emphasized in maintaining and repairing small engines.


AGTM 1330 Chemicals and Applications
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course is designed to familiarize students with agricultural pests and measures for pest control. Special emphasis will be placed on using the proper equipment and techniques for applying pesticides. Equipment and methods used to apply pesticides in agriculture with emphasis on techniques to avoid misapplication and pesticide drift.


AGTM 2500 Irrigation Systems Equipment Maintenance and Repair
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course will introduce students to the management and technology used in sprinkler irrigation systems. Emphasis will be on pivot maintenance and operation of Variable Rate (precision) Irrigation. Water requirements, water resources, application methods, types and selection of irrigation equipment, application time and rates, irrigation well principles and operation, maintenance and repair, costs and return will be covered.


AGTM 2600 Drones in Agriculture and Associated Computer Applications
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course will offer an introduction to Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) used in precision agriculture. This course will focus on hands-on learning of hardware and software on the college farm, discussion on related topics and ideas, and federal liscensing requirements.;


AHNA 1000 Nursing Assistant
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (6:5:3)

Description: This course focuses on the application of basic nursing skills needed to prepare students for employment as a nursing assistant in a variety of healthcare settings. The course includes a combination of lecture, skill lab, and clinical experiences to provide students the knowledge and skills needed to pass the state certification test. This course is a prerequisite to the nursing program (LPN) at Snow College. Course fee required.
Prerequisites: Participants must be at least 16 years of age to enroll in the CNA class. Preference will be given to 17 years or older.


ANTH 1000 Introduction to Anthropology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course introduces students to the four basic fields of Anthropology consisting of Physical Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, Archaeology, and Linguistic Anthropology. Anthropologists seek to understand what it means to be human by examining the physical and cultural factors that have influenced the origin, development, and behavior of humankind. Both general education credit and variable credit may be earned. To fulfill Social Science general education requirements, the class must be taken for 3 credits; however, 1-2 variable elective credits are offered for exigent circumstances.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


ART 1001 Summer Snow Workshops (formerly Summer Snow Master Classes)
Semester(s) Taught: Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Summer Snow is offered each June as two, one-week intensive workshops. Participants choose from 5-6 courses offered each week, which are taught by professionals working in a wide range of mediums. Each unique workshop curriculum is designed by the artist invited to teach in their discipline of expertise. Courses are designed for participants with skill levels from novice through professional. Each participant will create work based on their individual artistic performance, skill level, and studio discipline. A collective gallery exhibition and a daily lecture series by all Summer Snow instructors provides insight into process, studio practice, and philosophy of each artist participating each week. This course is repeatable for credit.


ART 1010 Introduction to the Visual Arts
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This is an introductory course for non-art majors in which students will learn to understand and appreciate art through the study of the visual language and art history. This course presents the fundamentals of the creative process, including structure, concept, material proficiency, and historical context. Emphasis is placed on developing the student's ability to critically analyze artistic works.


ART 1020 Basic Drawing (non-majors)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This studio course is an introduction to the dynamics of the visual language through the communicative means of drawing. This course is specifically designed for students not pursuing a career in art. The focus of this course is to provide the student with an appreciation for drawing through the development of observational drawing skills, employing a wide range of traditional mediums. Fundamental techniques, consistent in historic and contemporary artistic practices, will be stressed. No prior drawing experience necessary. A lab fee is required.


ART 1040 2D Studio Art (non-majors) (formerly Art Studio Practices-2D)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This general education course is designed for non-art major students who wish to expand their creative ability, sensibility, and vocabulary in the visual arts. Course content will introduce students to the visual language through lectures and discussion of history, theory, and criticism with an emphasis on the creation of art through a series of hands-on studio projects. Students will be exposed to studio practices in various types of two-dimensional media, including, but not limited to, drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, and digital media. A lab fee is required.
Prerequisites: none


ART 1050 Basic Photography
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: Basic Photography is a general education course designed for non-art major students who wish to expand their creative and technical ability in digital photography. Students will explore the meaning and making of images through lectures, discussion and camera work. Emphasis is placed on the development of creative expression and photography as a fine art medium. Topics include camera operation, light, image editing, formal aesthetics, historical perspectives, conceptual approaches, and exhibition presentation. DSLR camera and lab fee are required.


ART 1100 Visual Culture
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Integrated Exploration (IE)
Description: This course is an introduction to culture, theory, and practice associated with visual art. It will include visual arts orientation, readings, critical discussion, and research related to visual culture and meaning. Required of art majors. (Formerly Art Majors Orientation)


ART 1110 Drawing I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This foundation studio course is an introduction to the dynamics of the visual language through the expressive means of drawing. The focus of this course is the development of observational drawing skills, employing a wide range of mediums. This course will address the fundamental techniques consistent in historic and current artistic practices. Required of all art majors. A lab fee is required.


ART 1120 2D Surface (formerly 2D Design)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This foundation studio course introduces students to the dynamics of the visual language.; It will foster the development of compositional sensibility and promote the development of abilities in a variety of mediums, including analog and digital processes. Emphasis will will be placed on the study of theory and application of two-dimensional structure through assignments designed to develop creative thinking, critical analysis, and visual problem solving skills. A comprehensive portfolio will be required of each student.; This course is required of all art majors.; A lab fee is required.
Prerequisites: None


ART 1130 3D Space (formerly 3D Design)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This foundation studio course includes the study of the principles and elements of design and creative problem solving with application to three-dimensional space. Emphasis is placed on the systematic approach that artists use to take a work from conception to completion using both analog and digital means. This course is required for all art majors. A lab fee is required.
Prerequisites: None


ART 1140 4D Time
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This foundation studio course introduces students to time-based media.; Investigations will include conception, storyboarding, sequencing, narrative and non-linear time, stop motion animation, video, and sound design.; Both analog and digital components will be utilized to experiment with the broad range of time-based media available to visual artists. This course will culminate with a final portfolio of virtual kinetic work combining multiple and integrated applications of each technology. This course is required of all art majors. A lab fee is required.


ART 1150 Photo I (formerly Art 1140)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course introduces students to the fundamental practices and concepts in photography and explores multiple modes of photo-based image making.; Students will explore the nature and meaning of photographic representation and the role images play in contemporary culture.; Topics include DSLR camera operation, exposure, image editing, working with available light, elements of composition, exhibition presentation, historical photographic perspectives, and conceptual strategies used in making photographs.; Photo I is a required foundation course for all art majors.; A DSLR camera is required. (Additional fee required)
Corequisites: N/A


ART 1200 Art Talks
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is designed to expose students to a broad range of contemporary artistic disciplines, techniques, philosophies, and personalities through presentations by working professionals in the arts. All Visual Arts majors should enroll in this course for a minimum of four semesters to meet the AFA degree requirements at Snow College. This course is repeatable for credit. A lab fee is required.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


ART 1500 Silver & Alternative Photography
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course introduces analog photographic processes based in the traditional wet darkroom. Techniques include camera building, exposure, film processing, silver-based printing methods, and alternative and experimental 19th century photographic processes. Artworks are discussed in the context of historical and contemporary photographic concepts and imagery. Students will present a final portfolio and critiques will be held regularly throughout the semester. A film camera and course fee are required.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


ART 1600 Jewelry Making/Small Metals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course explores basic methods in designing and making jewelry and small metal sculpture from non-ferrous metals, stones, and other materials. Techniques taught and assignments will include soldering, cold joining, lost-wax casting, lapidary work, and patinas. A lab fee is required.


ART 1997 Internships
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on experiences in the Visual Arts. Internships are an opportunity for students to link theory with practice. They are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the workplace. Internships are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a faculty member in the chosen discipline and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.


ART 2000 AFA Capstone Seminar: Professional Practices
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: This capstone course is for Visual Art Majors who have been accepted to and are on track toward the AFA degree. Content will examine professional practices within the visual arts and is designed to prepare students for transfer and successful articulation into BFA programs. Emphasis will be placed on the development of an artist statement, curriculum vitae, oral and visual presentation skills, the digital documentation of portfolios, the promotion of an independent web presence, and the assessment of the visual arts program. The course will also lay the groundwork toward the staging of each student's required solo AFA exhibition. This course is required for all AFA degree candidates and should be taken the fall semester in the year which they anticipate graduating.


ART 2110 Experimental Drawing (formerly Drawing II)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This studio class is designed to expanding the language of drawing through experimentation of media, substrate, and content.; Students are expected to possess a basic level of proficiency in drawing from life and developed skill working in black and white and in a variety of dry drawing media. Students will be required to present and critically analyze drawings during group critiques.; This course is repeatable once for credit if taken from a different instructor.; A lab fee is required.


ART 2190 Figure Studio
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is designed for the practicing art student who wishes to continue their concentration and study of the human figure. The focus of this course will be placed on working from the live model. The development of observational, and creative skills will be stressed, employing a wide range of traditional and contemporary mediums. Composition, proportions, and work ethic will also be stressed. A lab fee is required
Prerequisites: Drawing I Art 1110


ART 2220 Screen Printing
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course explores screen printing, also known as serigraphy, as a dynamic and thriving visual art medium. Students will create original works of art utilizing the stark, graphic, and rapid character of the photo screen-stencil process as the catalyst. Study will include the evolution and historical significance of this versatile process as well as theory and application of contemporary approaches in the expansive world of printmaking. This course will include studio applications printing on rag paper, fabric, panel, and will include multiple artists? book studies utilizing screen printing technologies. A lab fee is required.


ART 2230 Relief Printmaking (formerly Printmaking I)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course explores relief printmaking as a dynamic and thriving visual art medium. Students will create original prints utilizing the processes of woodcut, linocut, plastic engraving, and experiment with photo polymer processes.; Study will include investigation of the evolution and historical significants of each process as well as contemporary trends in the world of printmaking.; In addition to a final portfolio of prints, this course will culminate with the conception and execution of an editioned artists' book utilizing relief printing technologies.; A lab fee is required.


ART 2240 Intaglio Printmaking (formerly Printmaking II)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course explores intaglio printmaking as a dynamic and thriving visual art medium. Students will create original prints utilizing the processes of drypoint, etching, aquatint, engraving, collagraph, and mezzotint.; Study will include investigation of the evolution and historical significants of each process as well as contemporary trends in the world of printmaking.; In addition to a final portfolio of prints, this course will culminate with the conception and execution of an editioned artists' book utilizing intaglio printing technologies.; A lab fee is required.


ART 2300 Introduction to Painting
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course is a foundation painting class (formerly Painting I ART 2200), which introduces students to the medium of oil and acrylic paint. Students engage in practical application of color theory and the fundamental techniques, and concepts consistent in historic and contemporary painting practices. Basic techniques of color mixing, brush handling, edge control and block in methods, as well as direct and indirect painting methods are covered.
Prerequisites: ART 1110


ART 2320 Portrait Painting
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This studio course is an introduction to portrait painting, emphasizing the techniques and process of rendering the human image and likeness. Demonstrations, lectures and assignments are used to inform and develop students' sensitivity and understanding of effective portrait painting. This course will address the fundamental processes consistent in historic and contemporary portrait painting practices. A lab fee is required.
Prerequisites: Drawing I ART 1110


ART 2400 Introduction to Graphic Design
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course introduces students to the art of visual communication through the discipline of graphic design. Content will include the forms, concepts, and methods of graphic design including: typography, spatial organization, illustration, visual metaphor, word/picture communication, and critical analysis. Students will apply software-imaging and analog skills to a variety of assigned creative problems. Assignments are designed to promote creative thinking, to improve visual problem solving skills, and to foster a greater understanding of how the viewer receives and interprets visual messaging. A comprehensive portfolio will be required of each student.


ART 2410 Introduction to Animation
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course will provide students with a foundation in animation and motion design using traditional and computer assisted techniques. Students will study the dynamics of kinetics, elements and principles of animation, character design and development, storytelling approaches, and audible applications, as they relate to this dynamic time-based medium. Students will explore these principles through a series of small exercises. In addition, students will complete a comprehensive, portfolio-worthy animated short of their own design, which will illustrate an understanding of the topics addressed throughout the semester. A lab fee is required for this course.
Prerequisites: Art 1140


ART 2420 Experimental Animation
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: In this course, students will learn the potential of animation as a fine art medium and a mode of cultural production. While utilizing a wide range of animation techniques, concepts, and software, students are encouraged to experiment, creating individual and collaborative animation shorts. Students will analyze historically and contemporarily relevant approaches to experimentation in the field of animation and relate them to their own animated art works. Students develop a fluency in cinematic language, acquiring technical skills as well as critical vocabulary for discussing creative work, while exercising their artistic intuition and expressive instincts. It is recommended that the students entering this class have a fundamental understanding of traditional principals of animation and storytelling structures. They will be encouraged to use that basic knowledge in furthering their skills through innovation and experimentation with variety of techniques and materials, exiting their comfort zone of the cartoon tradition. A lab fee is required for this course.


ART 2510 Photography: Portraits & Selfies
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course teaches students traditional and explorative methods in portrait and self-portrait photography. Students will explore the nature and meaning of photographic representation and the role portraiture plays in personal and cultural identity. Topics include intermediate camera operation, camera format, image editing, natural and artificial lighting, exhibition presentation, historical perspectives, and conceptual approaches used in making compelling portraits. Students should have a strong command of basic camera operation and manual exposure before enrolling in this course. DSLR camera and lab fee are required.


ART 2520 Photography: Landscape & Place
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course teaches students traditional and explorative methods in landscape photography.; Students will explore the nature and meaning of place as it relates to the environment, cultural identity, and photographic representation. Topics include intermediate camera operation, camera format, image editing, light, location shoots, exhibition presentation, historical perspectives, and conceptual approaches used in creating landscape images. Students should have a strong command of fundamental camera operation and manual exposure before enrolling in this course.; DSLR camera and lab fee are required.


ART 2600 Sculpture I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course is an introduction to the basic materials, techniques, and philosophies of sculpture. Students will explore various methods of production, such as modeling, carving, casting, fabrication, mixed media, and installation. A lab fee is required.


ART 2610 Frame Making Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This eight-week course is designed for student artists who desire to learn the skills necessary to fabricate professional level picture frames using inexpensive raw lumber stock. Participants will learn the proper safety and use of various carpentry hand tools and power equipment required for the construction of wood frames including, the table saw, miter saw, pneumatic sanders, and nail guns. Professional matting practices, glazing options, archival image mounting, frame assembly, hanging hardware, and gallery-hanging practices will be included. At the completion of the course, students will have multiple exhibit-ready matted, glazed, and framed works produced at a fraction of the cost of relying on retail frame shops. A lab fee is required.


ART 2630 Mixed Media: Collage + Assemblage
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This studio course explores material, process, historical context, aesthetics, legalities, and conceptual theory associated with appropriating and manipulating discarded media and found objects in the making of mixed media and altered art. Applied studio projects revolve around the genre of 2D collage and 3D assemblage. A lab fee is required.


ART 2650 Ceramic Sculpture
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: A beginning course designed to introduce students to the basic processes involved in creating ceramic sculpture. The course introduces a variety of clay techniques, such as pinch forming, coil building, and slab construction, as well as basic wheel throwing processes. A lab fee is required. (formerly ceramics 1)


ART 2670 Ecorche - The Skeleton
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: The focus of this course is the historic tradition of Ecorche (or Flayed) human figure for the purpose of anatomic study, with the emphasis being the human skeleton. The majority of class time will be devoted to the production of a reduced life-sized sculpture stressing the particular relationship of the bone structure of the human skeleton. Lectures and drawing assignments will reinforce the study of human anatomy and its importance to the practicing artist. A lab fee is required.
Prerequisites: Drawing I Art 1110


ART 2680 Ecorche - The Muscles
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: The focus of this course is the historic tradition of Ecorche (or Flayed) human figure for the purpose of anatomic study, with the emphasis being the muscles of the human body. The majority of class time will be devoted to the production of a reduced life ecorche? sculpture stressing the particular relationship of human muscle and bone. The main muscles of the body are explained using clay to understand their character and how they influence the surface form. Lectures and drawing assignments will reinforce the study of human anatomy and its importance to the practicing artist. A lab fee is required.
Prerequisites: Drawing I ART 1110


ART 2690 Figure Sculpture
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course is an introduction to modeling the human figure in clay. Students will construct portrait and figure sculptures while working from the live model. Armatures, human proportions, anatomy, and types of clay and modeling techniques will be explored. This course is one of a triad of classes that revolve around the human form including, BIOL 2150 Human Anatomy for Artists and ART 2900 Figure Drawing.


ART 2756 Travel Seminar
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is designed to expose art majors to the diversity of the art world through travel and first-hand experience. This one credit offering provides the opportunity to become immersed in the art and culture of major art centers both domestic and abroad.


ART 2950 Experiments in Visual Thinking
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Experiments in Visual Thinking is an idea-driven studio course designed to teach students to solve visual, conceptual, and material problems through interpretation and invention. Emphasis is placed on imagination, experimentation, audience, and on gaining an understanding of the rationale behind one's own and others artistic production. This course incorporates current themes in contemporary art. Students develop an expanded visual vocabulary of contemporary art practices while learning how to visually and verbally communicate their ideas and process. Students are expected to be self-motivated and directed. Class hours are devoted to lectures, discussions, presentations, demonstrations, studio time, and critiques. (Additional fee required)


ART 2997 Internships
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on experiences in the Visual Arts. Internships are an opportunity for students to link theory with practice. They are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the workplace. Internships are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a faculty member in the chosen discipline and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.


ART 3100 Figure Drawing
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course is an introduction to the practice of figure drawing (formerly Figure Drawing for Art Majors ART 2900). Priority is placed upon direct observation of the live model for the purpose of creating representational drawings while achieving correct proportions. Students will explore a variety of approaches to figure drawing, which include, short pose gesture drawings, and extended pose drawings. This exploration will include the study of form, volume, structure and anatomy, and how it relates to the superficial appearance of the model. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate basic competence in developing drawings involving the human form. This course is repeatable for credit. A lab fee is required.
Prerequisites: Art 1110


ARTH 2710 Art History Survey I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course surveys Western art and architecture from the Prehistoric through the Gothic periods. Focusing on important concepts and historical events within each culture, the chronological course examines art through artistic, political, religious, and social lenses. Required of all art majors.


ARTH 2720 Art History Survey II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course surveys Western art and architecture from the Proto-Renaissance through 21st Century. Focusing on important concepts and historical events within each culture, the chronological course examines art through artistic, political, religious, and social lenses. Required of all art majors.


AT 1715 Applied Technical Math
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course covers the principles of algebra, geometry, and measurement as they apply to problem solving in the Business and Applied Technologies (BAT) division programs. Topics includes basic algebra, graphing linear equations and inequalities, practical plane geometry, applications of volume and shapes, triangle trigonometry, applications of percents, and basic personal finance.
Prerequisites: Math 0700 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT Math score of 15 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.


AUTO 1000 Automotive Basics and Safety
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides proper knowledge and practices in safety to help establish working habits that would reflect industry standards and result in a safe working environment. This course is for Automotive and Diesel Technology students.


AUTO 1001 Automotive Technology I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

Description: This course covers careers in the Automotive Industry, ASE Certification, tools, fuels and fuel systems, lubrication systems, engines, engine classification, displacement, cooling systems, belts, intake, and exhaust systems.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


AUTO 1002 Automotive Technology II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

Description: This course covers the principles of suspension and steering, wheels and tires, electrical systems, starting systems, charging systems, lighting and wiring, and ignition systems.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


AUTO 1007 Principles of Technology I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This applied physics course covers scientific concepts of force, work, rate, resistance, energy, power, transformers, and mathematic computations necessary to perform experiments involving momentum as applied to mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems found in modern industry. Laboratory activities featuring measurement and instrumentation are emphasized.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


AUTO 1008 Principles of Technology II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This applied physics course covers mathematic computations necessary to perform experiments involving scientific concepts of vibrations, energy, conversion, transducers, radiation, light, and time constants as applied to mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems found in modern industry. Laboratory activities featuring measurement and instrumentation are emphasized.
Prerequisites: AUTO 1007
Corequisites: N/A


AUTO 1039 Automotive Technology III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:4)

Description: This course helps students understand and use work orders, calculate labor amounts, parts, and flat rate charges. Students shall also gain experience doing a variety of automotive repairs. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


AUTO 1101 Automotive Engine Repair
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course covers the construction and operational principles of basic gasoline engine systems and major overhaul of the complete automotive engine.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: AUTO 1105


AUTO 1105 Automotive Engine Repair Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:3)

Description: This course gives students the hands on lab experience required for Auto 1101. It covers the construction and operational principles of basic gasoline engine systems and major overhaul of the complete automotive engine.
Corequisites: AUTO 1101


AUTO 1201 Automatic Transmissions
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course covers theory, operation, diagnosis, and overhaul procedures of automotive automatic transmissions and trans-axles, including planetary gearing, valve bodies, computerized transmission controls, torque converters, and torque converter lock-up.
Corequisites: AUTO 1205


AUTO 1205 Automatic Transmissions Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:9)

Description: This course gives students the hands on lab experience required for Auto 1201. It covers theory, operation, diagnosis, and overhaul procedures of automotive automatic transmissions and trans-axles, including planetary gearing, valve bodies, computerized transmission controls, torque converters, and torque converter lock-up.
Corequisites: AUTO 1201


AUTO 1301 Automotive Manual Transmissions/Power Trains
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course covers theory, operation, diagnosis, maintenance, and overhaul of the clutch, standard transmission, standard trans-axles, drive lines, differentials, front-wheel drive units, and four-wheel drive components.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: AUTO 1305


AUTO 1305 Automotive Manual Transmissions/Power Trains
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:9)

Description: This course gives students the hands on lab experience required for Auto 1301. It covers theory, operation, diagnosis, maintenance, and overhaul of the clutch, standard transmission, standard trans-axles, drive lines, differentials, front wheel drive units, and four wheel drive components.
Corequisites: AUTO 1301


AUTO 1401 Automotive Suspension and Steering (formerly AUTO 1400)
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course covers repair and adjustment suspension and steering systems. Students study steering gears, rack and pinion, conventional and McPhearson struts, alignment angles, and alignment with a computerized four-wheel alignment fixture. Corequisite: This lecture AUTO 1401 must be taken concurrently with the lab AUTO 1405.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: AUTO 1405


AUTO 1405 Automotive Suspension and Steering Lab (formerly AUTO 1400)
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:9)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience for AUTO 1401. This course covers repair and adjustment suspension and steering systems. Students study steering gears, rack and pinion, conventional and McPhearson struts, alignment angles, and alignment with a computerized four-wheel alignment fixture. Corequisite: This lab AUTO 1405 must be taken concurrently with the lecture AUTO 1401.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: AUTO 1401


AUTO 1501 Automotive Brake Systems
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course covers the construction and operational principles of basic gasoline engine systems and major overhaul of the complete automotive engine.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: AUTO 1505


AUTO 1505 Automotive Brake Systems Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:9)

Description: This course gives students the hands on lab experience required for Auto 1501. It covers the principles, repair, and adjustment of the automotive brake system and includes hydraulic theory, diagnosis, and service of brake systems. Students study drums, disks, power units, and Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) brakes.
Corequisites: AUTO 1501


AUTO 1509 Hot Rod and Performance Vehicles
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: This course will teach students the theory and skills required to build and modify engines, drive-trains, suspensions, and vehicles for increased performance and personal taste. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


AUTO 1519 Basic Automotive Upholstery
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: This course will teach students the basic skills to repair or create a stock or custom interior in their automobile, truck, boat, motorcycle, etc. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


AUTO 1600 Automotive Electrical and Electronics I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:3)

Description: This course covers the principles and laws that govern electrical circuits, including Ohm's and Kirchhoff's Laws. Student will also gain understanding of the use of meters, wiring diagrams, wiring repair, conductors, semiconductors, PN junctions, diodes, transistors, multiplexing, computers, and sensors.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


AUTO 1601 Automotive Basic Electronics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This course covers the principles and laws that govern electrical circuits, including Ohm's and Kirchhoff's Laws. Students will also gain understanding of the use of meters, wiring diagrams, wiring repair, conductors, semiconductors, PN junctions, diodes, transistors, multiplexing, computers and sensors.
Corequisites: AUTO 1605


AUTO 1605 Automotive Basic Electronics Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience required for AUTO 1601. Students will use the principles and laws that govern electrical circuits, including Ohm's and Kirchhoff's Laws. Students will also gain understanding of the use of meters, wiring diagrams, wiring repair, conductors, semiconductors, PN junctions, diodes, transistors, multiplexing, computers and sensors.
Corequisites: AUTO 1601


AUTO 1801 Automotive Fuel, Emissions, and Ignition Systems
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Students will have an understanding of the theory, operation, diagnosis, and repair of fuel, emission control systems, and ignition systems.
Corequisites: AUTO 1805


AUTO 1805 Automotive Fuel, Emissions, and Ignition Systems Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience required for Auto 1801. Students will have an understanding of the theory, operation, diagnosis, and repair of fuel, emission control systems, and ignition systems.
Corequisites: AUTO 1801


AUTO 2601 Automotive Electrical and Electronics II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This course covers the theory, operation, and diagnosis of starting systems, charging systems, lighting systems, instrumentation, and automotive accessories. Corequisite: The lecture AUTO 2601 must be taken concurrently with the lab AUTO 2605.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: AUTO 2605


AUTO 2605 Automotive Electrical and Electronics II Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course satisfies the hands-on practical lab experience required for the AUTO 2601 class. It covers the, operation, and diagnosis of starting and charging systems, lighting systems, instrumentation, communication networks, accessories, hybrid vehicles, safety and restraint systems, radio frequency and infotainment systems. Corequisite: The lab AUTO 2605 must be taken concurrently with the lecture AUTO 2601.
Corequisites: AUTO 2601


AUTO 2701 Automotive Heating and Air Conditioning (formerly AUTO 2700)
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: Students will cover the principles, operation, and servicing of automotive air conditioning and heating systems and their components. Corequisite: The lecture AUTO 2701 must be taken concurrently with the lab AUTO 2705.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: AUTO 2705


AUTO 2705 Automotive Heating and Air Conditioning Lab (formerly AUTO 2700)
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:5)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience required for AUTO 2701. Students will cover the principles, operation, and servicing of automotive air conditioning and heating systems and their components. Corequisite: The lab AUTO 2705 must be taken concurrently with the lecture AUTO 2701.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: AUTO 2701


AUTO 2801 Automotive Engine Performance/Computerized Engine Controls
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Students will cover diagnosis, adjustment, and repair of the systems which affects engine performance. Emphasis will be placed on computerized engine control systems of various makes. Use of diagnostic equipment is heavily emphasized.
Corequisites: AUTO 2805


AUTO 2805 Automotive Engine Performance/Computerized Engine Controls Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience required for Auto 2801. Students will cover diagnosis, adjustment, and repair of the systems which affects engine performance. Emphasis will be placed on computerized engine control systems of various makes. Use of diagnostic equipment is heavily emphasized.
Corequisites: AUTO 2801


AUTO 2990 Shop Practicum I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-6:0:2-12)

Description: This course provides supervised work experience at a sponsoring dealership or repair garage which applies directly to previous automotive courses. Proof of employment and approval by faculty supervisor is required.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


AUTO 2991 Shop Practicum II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-6:0:2-12)

Description: This course provides supervised work experience at a sponsoring dealership or repair garage which applies directly to previous automotive courses. Proof of employment and approval by faculty supervisor is required.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


B


BIOL 1010 General Biology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: General biology is a fundamental course in the underlying principles of life to include the method of obtaining knowledge (scientific method), molecular components of cellular structures and their functions, genetics and speciation, diversity of living organisms with surveys of the three domains and eukaryote kingdoms, and an introduction to ecology and the role of humankind in the biosphere.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


BIOL 1015 General Biology Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: The general biology laboratory component allows for student application of the principles learned in general biology lecture with an emphasis on investigative learning. This component (BIOL 1015) is optional, but in order to count as a laboratory experience, it must be taken concurrently with BIOL 1010. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: The laboratory BIOL 1015 must be taken concurrently with the lecture BIOL 1010.


BIOL 1050 Human Biology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: Human Biology is the study of the human species at the levels of organization from the atomic through the biosphere. Emphasis is placed on the major organ systems, health issues, genetics, evolution, and man's interaction with the environment as related to the biology of humans and the quality of life. This course is for students whose major course of study is not in the sciences. This course will partially satisfy the Natural Science GE requirement (LS). While not required, it is recommended that Biol 1055 (Human Biology Lab) is taken concurrently.
Corequisites: None


BIOL 1055 Human Biology Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: The human biology laboratory component allows for student application of the principles learned in human biology lecture with an emphasis on investigative learning. This component (BIOL 1055) is optional, but in order to count as a laboratory experience, it must be taken concurrently with BIOL 1050.
Corequisites: BIOL 1050


BIOL 1420 Environmental Biology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: Environmental biology examines the varied dimensions of environmental issues, problems and solutions in the context of the biological sciences. To understand global environmental biology issues, students will become fluent in topics including biodiversity, ecosystem function, agriculture and food production, energy systems, water, urbanization, population dynamics, air quality, and climate. The course consists of lectures, participation exercises, and the application assignments (in-class and field based)--all of which will require critical thinking and data analysis skills.


BIOL 1425 Environmental Biology Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: The environmental biology laboratory allows students hands-on application and experimentation of principles taught during environmental biology lecture. This component (BIOL 1425) is optional, but in order to count as a laboratory experience, it must be taken concurrently with BIOL 1420. (Lab fee required).
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: The laboratory BIOL 1425 must be taken concurrently with the lecture BIOL 1420.


BIOL 1450 Human Dynamics for Visual Artists and Performers (Formerly BIOL 2150)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: Human Dynamics for Visual Artists and Performers is designed primarily for students interested in the human figure and its form and function as it relates to drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, dance, and athletics. The focus of the course is primarily on the musculoskeletal system, but includes the study of the human species at levels of organization from the atomic through the biosphere with the study of cell biology, major organ systems, genetics, human development, evolution, and ecology. It must be taken concurrently with the laboratory, BIOL 1455.
Corequisites: BIOL 1455


BIOL 1455 Human Dynamics for Visual Artists and Performers Lab (Formerly BIOL 2155)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: This course is the laboratory component of BIOL 2150 and gives students the opportunity to study laboratory models, skeletal material, and cadavers. It must be taken concurrently with the lecture, BIOL 1450.
Corequisites: BIOL 1450


BIOL 1460 Birds, Biology, and You
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: Birds, Biology, and Learning and Teaching the Story of Life examines the biology of birds, compares it to human biology, and explores how to teach the biology of birds to children in the classroom and at home. To understand bird biology, students will become fluent in topics including bird classification, how to identify birds by sight and song, citizen science in the home and the classroom, bird conservation, teaching bird biology, and how bird anatomy and physiology compares to that of humans. The course consists of lectures, participation exercises, and application assignments (in-class and field-based) - all of which will require critical thinking and data analysis.


BIOL 1465 Bird Biology Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:1)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: This course is the laboratory component of Bird Biology, BIOL 1460 and gives students the opportunity to study birds in the laboratory and the field. It must be taken concurrently with BIOL 1460.
Corequisites: BIOL 1460


BIOL 1610 Biology I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: This course introduces the scientific method, cell chemistry, cell structure and function, gene action and genetics, natural selection and mechanisms of speciation, the origin of life, diversity of living organisms and classification, and surveys of viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi, and the human immune system. This is the first semester course of a year-long sequence that is required for most biology majors, many pre-professional majors, natural resource majors and some agriculture majors.
Prerequisites: It is recommended that the student will have successfully completed high school biology and chemistry.
Corequisites: BIOL 1615


BIOL 1615 Biology I Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: The Biology I laboratory component allows for student application of the principles learned in Biology I lecture with an emphasis on investigative learning and collaboration. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: It is recommended that the student will have successfully completed high school biology and chemistry.
Corequisites: BIOL 1610


BIOL 1620 Biology II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: This course introduces major phyla and classes of the Chromista, red algae, green algae, plants, and animals through the study of structure/function relationships, reproductive mechanisms, adaptations, and evolutionary development, physiology, ecology, and human importance. This is the second semester course of a year long sequence that is required for most biology majors, many preprofessional majors, Natural Resource majors, and some Agriculture majors.
Prerequisites: BIOL 1610 and 1615, or instructor
Corequisites: BIOL 1625


BIOL 1625 Biology II Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: The Biology II laboratory component allows for student application of the principles learned in the Biology II lecture course with an emphasis on investigative learning and collaboration. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: BIOL 1610 and 1615, or instructor
Corequisites: BIOL 1620


BIOL 1820 Careers in Medicine and Related Fields
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course will survey careers in medicine and related fields such as nursing, radiological technology, laboratory technology, physical therapy, dental hygiene and exercise science. It will also address aspects of each career (character of the work, opportunities, schooling, etc.) as well as resources for learning of careers, factors in selecting a medical and related career, and successful preparation and application.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


BIOL 1997 Biological/Health Sciences Internship I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on practical/work experiences in the biological or health sciences. Internships are an opportunity for students to link theory with practice. They are also designed to help students network with professionals, increasing opportunities to receive full-time employment after graduation. Internships can introduce students to multiple professions, helping them narrow down their specific areas of interest early on in their college experience. They are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the workplace. Internships can be paid or volunteer in nature. They can occur with a business, organization, or government agency and are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a biological sciences faculty member and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Each credit requires 45 clock hours of internship experience. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.
Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA; 30 semester credit hours (6 in the biological sciences or have a state-issued certificate or licensure in a healthcare related field) or instructor permission.


BIOL 2030 Introductory Genetics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This introductory genetics course includes the studies of transmission, population, and quantitative genetics incorporating both molecular and classical aspects of genetic studies.
Prerequisites: Any biology core course such as BIOL 1010, 1050, 1610, or with instructor permission.
Corequisites: BIOL 2035


BIOL 2035 Introductory Genetics Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: This laboratory course allows for student experimentation and application of principles learned in the Introductory Genetics lecture course. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: Any biology core course such as BIOL 1010, 1050, 1610, etc. or instructor
Corequisites: BIOL 2030


BIOL 2060 Introductory Microbiology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: Introductory Microbiology surveys the fundamental biological processes observed in bacteria and microorganisms with emphasis placed on their beneficial and harmful activities related to humans and other organisms. Molecular genetics and biotechnology are introduced. It must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2065.
Corequisites: BIOL 2060 must be taken concurrently with the Laboratory BIOL 2065.


BIOL 2065 Introductory Microbiology Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: The laboratory component allows for student application of microbiological principles with an emphasis on investigative learning and collaboration. It must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2060. (Lab fee required)
Corequisites: The laboratory BIOL 2065 must be taken concurrently with the lecture BIOL 2060.


BIOL 2100 Honors Biology
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

General Ed Requirement: Science Inquiry (SI)
Description: This course is a study of biological thought. It is approached through the reading and discussion of current and classic literature in biology and through interaction with professions in the life sciences.
Prerequisites: Any general education or majors biology class.
Corequisites: Any general education or majors biology class.


BIOL 2120 Rural Health Scholars
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is designed to give students preparing for careers in health care (nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, dental hygiene, speech pathology, audiology, pharmacy, medicine, etc.) opportunities for service, leadership, and exposure to various careers in health care. It will also provide instruction in making applications, writing personal statements, and interviewing. There will also be discussions based on articles dealing with issues related to health care such as emerging diseases, new treatments, and ethics. Students will be responsible for attendance, article discussions, advising sessions, community service hours, and maintaining a journal of these activities. All activities will be evaluated throughout the semester. All students considering a career in health care are encouraged to enroll. Enrollment may be continued each semester for elective credit. (Additional fee required)


BIOL 2121 Rural Health Scholars - Basic Medical Skills
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is designed to give continued guidance to pre-health profession students at Snow College involved in the Rural Health Scholars program. Students will learn basic medical skills from current health care professionals and how they can apply them as future health care workers. Students will continue to learn about volunteerism, leadership, job shadowing and patient exposure and its impact on themselves and their future academic goals. Students will continue to read weekly health care articles to stay informed on relevant topics currently affecting health care.
Prerequisites: BIOL 2120
Corequisites: N/A


BIOL 2122 Rural Health Scholars: Critical Analysis and Reading in Healthcare
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is designed to give continued guidance to pre-health profession students involved in the Rural Health Scholars program. Students will be assigned a book relevant to the health care field to read during the semester. Students will be required to provide reflection on the book as well as continue to learn about volunteerism, leadership, job shadowing and patient exposure and its impact on themselves and their future academic goals.
Prerequisites: BIOL 2120
Corequisites: N/A


BIOL 2200 General Microbiology
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: This general microbiology course is designed for those with a basic understanding of biology and chemistry. The course will cover the morphology, reproduction, metabolism, microbial and molecular genetics, biotechnology, ecology, and diversity of microorganisms. An emphasis will be placed on bacteria, viruses, fungi, protists, and their role in the environment and human disease. The lecture must be taken concurrently with the lab BIOL 2205. Courses must be taken together to satisfy the Life Science GE requirement.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1210 or CHEM 1110 and BIOL 1610 or BIOL 2420, or instructor permission
Corequisites: BIOL 2205


BIOL 2205 General Microbiology Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:4)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: The laboratory component will involve hands-on experience in microscopy, staining methods, aseptic technique, media preparation, sterilization, maintenance of cultures, microbial identification, molecular biology and enumeration methods. The lab must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2200. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: CHEM 1210 or CHEM 1110 and BIOL 1610 or BIOL 2420, or instructor
Corequisites: BIOL 2200


BIOL 2220 General Ecology for Life Science Majors
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Study of the interrelationhips among organisms and their environents, addressing where and how organisms live.; Adaptation, population growth, species interactions, biodiversity, and ecosystem function are explored for a wide variety of organisms and ecosystems.
Prerequisites: BIOL 1610, BIOL 1615, or permission of instructor
Corequisites: BIOL 2225


BIOL 2225 General Ecology for Life Science Majors Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: Basic concepts of ecology will be studied in the field. The students will also be introduced to some of the field techniques used by ecologists. The course will require participation in a four-day field trip. This course is designed for life science majors. (Lab fee required)
Corequisites: BIOL 2220


BIOL 2320 Human Anatomy
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: This course is a comprehensive study of the structure of the human body. It is designed primarily for students preparing for careers in nursing, physical therapy, and other health care fields. It must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2325. Lecture and lab sections must be the same. For example, if a student enrolls in BIOL 2320.001, that student must enroll in BIOL 2325.001.
Corequisites: BIOL 2325


BIOL 2325 Human Anatomy Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: This course is the laboratory component of Human Anatomy (BIOL 2320). It gives students the opportunity to study models, skeletal material, and cadavers. It must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2320.
Corequisites: BIOL 2320


BIOL 2420 Human Physiology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Human physiology is the study of the functions of the human body. A major emphasis is placed on the mechanisms that regulate the functions of individual organ systems. The complex interactions between systems that maintain a constant, dynamic internal environment which is important for normal cell function will also be discussed. This class is for students whose major course of study is an allied health profession and for those interested in careers in biology, medicine or dentistry. To be successful in Human Physiology it is strongly recommended that the following courses have been completed: CHEM 1110 or CHEM 1210 And BIOL 1610 or BIOL 2060 or BIOL 2200 Many allied health programs require or award extra points for some of these recommended courses; it is suggested that students verify the specific prerequisites of any programs they intend to apply to. A voluntary supplemental instruction course will be taught each week as a benefit for student learning.
Corequisites: BIOL 2425


BIOL 2425 Human Physiology Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science Lab (LB)
Description: The laboratory portion of human physiology provides hands-on exercises that reinforce the major topics covered in the lecture portion of the course. This course must be taken concurrently with BIOL 2420. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: Strongly recommended BIOL 2320, CHEM 1110 or 1210
Corequisites: BIOL 2425 must be taken concurrently with the lecture, BIOL 2420


BIOL 2450 Undergraduate Teaching in Biology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: Undergraduate Teaching in Biology is offered to students that are interested in acting as teaching assistants in biology laboratories or in assisting in the preparation of cadavers for anatomy laboratories. Students will participate in some, or all, of the following activities: read assignments related to labs taught, review and discuss topics in the discipline, assist in laboratory preparation, and assist in the teaching of biological laboratories. Students in this course must have successfully completed the course to be taught and have the consent of the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of the course being taught and instructor consent


BIOL 2580 Introduction to Soil Science
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Introduction to Soil Science is a course for students majoring in agriculture, botany, and natural resources.; Concepts covered in this class include: fundamentals of soil formation, soil physical properties, classification, chemistry, microbiology, and fertility. Completion of CHEM 1110 or 1210 and MATH 1030 or above is recommended.
Corequisites: BIOL 2585


BIOL 2585 Introduction to Soil Science Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: The Introduction to Soil Science Laboratory component allows for student application of the principles learned in Introduction to Soil Science lecture with an emphasis on investigative learning and collaboration. (Lab fee required)
Corequisites: BIOL 2580


BIOL 2650 Pathophysiology
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: The study of pathophysiology is the study of the dynamic changes in cell and organ function that occur in injury and disease. This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of pathophysiology. The focus of this course will be the abnormal functioning of diseased organs as well as gross and microscopic characteristics of diseased tissue. Epidemiology and clinical manifestations are integrated throughout the course. Students will briefly explore normal cell, organ and organ system function and use this as a basis to understand how injury and disease alter normal physiology. Prerequisites: BIOL 2320, BIOL 2420, CHEM 1110.
Prerequisites: BIOL 2320, BIOL 2420, CHEM 1110


BIOL 2915 Undergraduate Research
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in classroom settings to actual research experience. No more than six students will assist one faculty member in that person's research. Students will receive faculty direction for at least one hour a week and lab research participation will usually range from two to four hours weekly. A short summary will be required to be presented to a small, in-lab seminar of interested students and faculty at end of semester. An additional fee is required for consumables.
Prerequisites: BIOL 1610 & BIOL 1615 or Permission of the Instructor


BIOL 2925 Undergraduate Research
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in classroom settings to actual research experience. No more than six students will assist one faculty member in that person's research. Students will receive faculty direction for at least one hour a week and lab research participation will usually range from two to four hours weekly. A short summary will be required to be presented to a small, in-lab seminar of interested students and faculty at end of semester. An additional fee is required for consumables.
Prerequisites: BIOL 1610 & BIOL 1615 or Permission of the Instructor


BUS 1010 Introduction to Business
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to expose students from any area of study to the many functions of modern business. The course shows students how these functions exist in a changing society and the types of decisions which must be made within that environment. The importance of business in modern society is also emphasized throughout the course. In an introductory manner, the course covers topics such as entrepreneurship, economics, management, human resource management, marketing, and accounting.


BUS 1020 Computer Technology and Applications
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: BUS 1020 is an introductory course covering computer related topics and business computer applications. Students will use Microsoft Office or Office 365 to learn the basics of word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software and use all applications in a final project. Other technology related topics may include computer concepts, security, ethics, operating systems, email, Internet features, blogs, podcasts, Canvas, and other various technologies and computer applications related to a major or career. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


BUS 1060 QuickBooks for Small Business
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed for entrepreneurs or small business owners who have chosen to use QuickBooks software to manage accounting. The course teaches basic accounting concepts and simple automated accounting methods for recording business transactions and maintaining necessary financial reports.


BUS 1110 Digital Media Tools
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This course will introduce students to the basics of digital media (e.g. image, video, audio editing) and the evolving industry. The divisions of digital media will be discussed along with computer applications that are considered industry standards. This course will familiarize students with basic techniques and with the hardware and software tools used to create the various media for powerful digital media productions. (Additional fee required.)


BUS 1170 Human Relations in Organizations
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This is an introductory course in human relations principles and skills applicable to management effectiveness, career success, and personal relationships. Theories and methods of organizational behavior, professionalism, motivation, team building, conflict resolution, leadership, negotiation, cultural differences, and personal communication are discussed. Practical application and development of skills in these areas are emphasized throughout the course. Successful completion of the course satisfies the Social and Behavior Science General Education requirement.


BUS 1200 Business Careers Seminar
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course will introduce students to the many rewarding career and educational opportunities in business. Students will explore the Business Department degree and certificate options available at Snow, as well as future educational and career possibilities. The course is designed to help students connect career interests with educational options and requirements. Guest lecturers will include professionals from industry, as well as representatives from four-year business programs at transfer schools.


BUS 1210 Personal and Consumer Finance
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course will introduce personal and consumer financial concepts and give students basic tools to make sound financial decisions in today's society based on economic trends and research.A This is a practical course in personal money management consisting of financial planning including career choices, budgeting, planning for retirement, financing a home and automobile, and understandingA consumer credit,A taxes, insurance, and investments. Students will use basic math skills as well as read, write, and think critically.Note: This course is cross-listed as HFST 1210 and meets general education requirements for Social and Behavioral Science.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


BUS 1270 Strategic Selling
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Integrated Exploration (IE)
Description: BUS 1270 is a pragmatic course that explores the theory and application of sales and customer service, with a focus on relationship building. Students will present multiple sales presentations based on strategies, theories, and best practices learned in class. The culmination of the course is a final sales presentation which provides an opportunity to apply what was learned throughout the term.


BUS 1300 Social Media Marketing
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Social Media Marketing will provide participants with a foundation and skillset in the continuously evolving world of social media marketing. These tools and strategies can be immediately applied in the workplace and in life. Students will learn how to create meaningful relationships with customers, colleagues, and employers through the use of social media. The course will provide a solid introduction to online community building and creating value using social media interaction. The effective use of relevant social media tools and platforms will be covered.


BUS 1510 Photoshop
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course introduces students to editing digital images. Students will develop skills in photo manipulation using Adobe Photoshop. Students will also learn different editing methods through projects and examples.


BUS 1600 Entrepreneurship Seminars
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: In this course students are introduced to the challenges and rewards of entrepreneurship as they learn from the experiences shared by successful guest entrepreneurs. Each guest entrepreneur offers insight regarding starting, operating, and harvesting a successful venture to inform and inspire students.


BUS 1700 Professional Business Leadership
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Students who take this course will be involved in the Snow College Business Club and will affiliate with national business student organizations Phi Beta Lambda (FBLA-PBL) and/or Collegiate DECA. Students develop valuable leadership skills, build their resumes, meet business leaders in the community and beyond, learn professional presentation strategies, experience the rewards of community service, and enjoy optional unique travel opportunities -- all while networking with both peers and professionals. This course is repeatable for credit.


BUS 1997 Cooperative Education Experience
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in the classroom to actual job experience. Classroom instruction must precede the job experience or the student must be registered for courses at the same time the student is enrolled in the work experience.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Corequisites: N/A


BUS 1998 Cooperative Education Experience
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in the classroom to actual job experience. Classroom instruction must precede the job experience or the student must be registered for courses at the same time the student is enrolled in the work experience.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Corequisites: N/A


BUS 1999 Cooperative Education Experience
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-6:0:2-12)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in the classroom to actual job experience. Classroom instruction must precede the job experience or the student must be registered for courses at the same time the student is enrolled in the work experience. (A maximum of 12 semester credits may be applied to graduation.)
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Corequisites: N/A


BUS 2010 Business Computer Proficiency
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed for business majors and those wanting a thorough knowledge of spreadsheets and databases. Students will use Microsoft Excel and Access. The course will cover introductory to intermediate database concepts and intermediate to advanced spreadsheet concepts. Students will complete an integrated project using both applications to solve business problems. Students should have a basic understanding of computer applications and file management. BUS 1020 is recommended as a prerequisite. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


BUS 2050 Business Law
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course addresses basic principles of business law, including the legal environment of business, forms of business organization, ethics, torts, contracts, agency, and the purchase and sale of goods under the Uniform Commercial Code. This class will provide a basic framework of business law which will help students who either start their own business, work for someone else, or pursue a legal degree.


BUS 2200 Business Communication
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: In this course, students learn highly marketable skills in preparing strategic professional business documents and presentations. Students explore a variety of problem-solving approaches typical in a professional environment. This course includes employment document preparation, as well as job interview strategies and techniques. BUS 2200 is required for the Associate of Science Business degree. Skills learned in this course are valuable to students in any major.


BUS 2222 Entrepreneurship
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Open to students from any discipline, this introductory course is intended to provide students with a solid foundation in how to turn entrepreneurial ideas into reality. In this class, students can find the knowledge and strategies to take their ideas to the next level, whether they are ready to channel their inspiration into a new venture or take their ideas to a larger organization.


BUS 2450 Presentations for Business
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed for students to develop effective oral presentation skills, allowing for increased poise and self-confidence. Students learn marketable skills such as how to integrate presentation and technical skills to create dynamic and professional presentations that may be presented online and/or to live audiences. The course teaches students how to perform audience analysis for planning a well-received presentation with a clear purpose. Students will be given multiple opportunities to plan, develop, deliver, and evaluate presentations. Strategies for overcoming presentation anxiety and relaxation techniques will be explored.


BUS 2650 Management Principles for Entrepreneurs
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course addresses specific management strategies related to starting, owning, operating, and growing a small business. Students will explore marketing, customer service, financial management, leadership, ethics, and growth opportunities. Real-world case studies and examples will be used throughout the course, along with contemporary readings relevant in the current business environment.


BUS 2750 Business Travel Seminar
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides a dynamic business-oriented travel experience in which students are exposed to real-world business scenarios. The seminar may include domestic or international travel. Students participate in daily focus activities with local professionals while on the travel experience and may attend preparatory lectures before or follow-up sessions after the travel dates. Students will be responsible for travel expenses. This course is repeatable one time for credit. Instructor permission required.
C


CHEM 1010 Introductory Chemistry
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This course introduces individuals to a variety of chemistry-related knowledge and experience and is designed to give non-majors a glimpse at chemistry and how it relates to the world around them. As a general education course, it relates chemistry to the real world experience and gives the student an opportunity to investigate chemical principles in their life. It gives the student a feeling for how scientists view problems and the systematic method by which they solve them. Discussion topics are chosen from physical, organic, and biological areas inside the chemistry field.
Prerequisites: MATH 0850 or equivalent


CHEM 1015 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: This is a hands-on laboratory experience that accompanies the CHEM 1010 course. It is designed to give students a feel for basic laboratory equipment and measurement. It also provides reinforcement of the concepts covered in the class. The lab also enables students to visualize many concepts and experiments discussed in class.
Prerequisites: MATH 0850 or equivalent


CHEM 1110 Elementary Chemistry
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This course introduces individuals to a variety of chemistry-related knowledge and experience. As a general education course, it relates chemistry to the real world experience and gives the student an opportunity to investigate chemical principles in their life. The course serves as a prerequisite to programs related to allied health such as nursing, economics, biology, natural resources, and others. The course also serves as a preparatory course for general chemistry. Some topics in the course are atomic structure, chemical calculations, energy and matter, gas laws, nuclear chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry.
Prerequisites: MATH 0850 or above
Corequisites: CHEM 1115 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory


CHEM 1115 Elementary Chemistry Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: This is a general inorganic and organic chemistry laboratory which reinforces the fundamental facts, theories and laws of chemistry through laboratory experiences. (It is designed for students in home economics, nursing, physical therapy, some areas of biology, forestry and agriculture, as well as other related health sciences.) Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1110 is required. A lab fee is required.
Prerequisites: MATH 0850, 0900 or equivalent
Corequisites: CHEM 1110


CHEM 1120 Elementary Organic/Biochemistry
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This is the second semester course of a General Organic and Biochemistry sequence. It completes an introduction to organic chemistry and covers elementary biochemistry. It includes the study of alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and derivatives. Also included are topics of: stereochemistry, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, and metabolism. Students taking this course are typically pursuing majors that may include home economics, agricultural sciences, physical therapy, nursing, and other related health sciences.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1110 and CHEM 1115 (both successfully completed)
Corequisites: CHEM 1125


CHEM 1125 Elementary Organic/Biochemistry Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This is an organic and biochemistry laboratory which reinforces the fundamental facts, theories, and laws of chemistry through laboratory experiences. It is designed for students in family and consumer science, nursing, physical therapy, some areas of biology, forestry and agriculture. Lab fee required.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1110 and CHEM 1115 (both successfully completed)
Corequisites: CHEM 1120


CHEM 1210 Principles of Chemistry I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This course is designed to teach chemical theory and principles as they are applied to present day chemistry.; Topics covered in this course include atomic theory, gas laws, thermochemistry, molecular bonding, reaction chemistry, etc.; This course is for students majoring in programs such as chemistry, physics, geology, biology, engineering and pre-medical areas who will take additional chemistry courses.
Prerequisites: Math 1050, equivalent, or concurrently enrolled in Math 1050
Corequisites: Chem 1215


CHEM 1215 Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: This course is an introduction to the chemistry laboratory as it applies to present day chemistry.; This chemistry lab course is to be taken concurrently with CHEM 1210. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: High School Chemistry or College Chemistry course with a lab, and Math 1050
Corequisites: Chem 1210, concurrent enrolement in or completion of Math 1050


CHEM 1220 Principles of Chemistry II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This course is a continuation of CHEM 1210.; The principles of equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, and solution chemistry are applied to present-day chemistry.; This course is for students in the natural sciences such as Chemistry, Physics, Biology, engineering, and Pre-medical areas who will take additional chemistry courses.
Prerequisites: a grade of C- or higher in CHEM 1210
Corequisites: CHEM 1225


CHEM 1225 Principles of Chemistry Laboratory II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: This chemistry lab course is to be taken concurrently with CHEM 1220.; This course is designed to give students experience with lab experiments related to kinetics, acid-base chemistry, qualitative analysis, electrochemistry, polymers, and introduce basic synthesis techniques and crystal field theory. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: CHEM 1210 and CHEM 1215
Corequisites: CHEM 1220


CHEM 2310 Organic Chemistry I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: CHEM 2310 is the first semester of a full-year course in organic chemistry, which is the study of the structures and properties of compounds primarily composed of carbon and hydrogen. Reactivity is studied in the context of mechanism patterns associated with functional groups, with emphasis on synthesis and biochemical applications. This course is required for all chemistry-centered majors, most pre-professional programs, and many life science majors, and is commonly taken in the second year of study.
Prerequisites: CHEM 1210 and CHEM 1220
Corequisites: CHEM 2315


CHEM 2315 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: CHEM 2315 is the laboratory complement of CHEM 2310. The laboratory experience reinforces the principles of organic chemistry by teaching foundational techniques and simple synthesis reactions. This lab course is designed for pre-professional majors as well as chemistry majors. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: CHEM 1215 and CHEM 1225
Corequisites: CHEM 2310


CHEM 2320 Organic Chemistry II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: CHEM 2320 is the second semester of a full-year course in organic chemistry, which is the study of the structures and properties of compounds primarily composed of carbon and hydrogen. Reactivity is studied in the context of mechanism patterns associated with functional groups, with emphasis on synthesis and biochemical applications. This course is required for all chemistry-centered majors, most pre-professional programs, and many life science majors, and is commonly taken in the second year of study.
Prerequisites: CHEM 2310 and CHEM 2315
Corequisites: CHEM 2325


CHEM 2325 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: CHEM 2325 is the laboratory complement of CHEM 2320. The laboratory experience reinforces the principles of organic chemistry by providing opportunities to perform reactions studied in the lecture course. This lab course is designed for pre-professional majors as well as chemistry majors. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: CHEM 2310 and CHEM 2315
Corequisites: CHEM 2320


CHEM 2906 In-depth Investigations in Chemistry
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is designed to give students an in-depth look at a chemistry related topic. It includes weekly reading assignments, meetings, group discussions, and excursions to pertinent sites. Students will engage the chosen topic and examine it in depth from a variety of perspectives.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval


CHIN 1010 Elementary Chinese I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

Description: This course provides an introduction to speaking, listening, and a limited amount of reading and writing in Mandarin Chinese.; It is designed for students with no previous Chinese study. During the course, students develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Chinese in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Mandarin at a basic level. Elemental cultural themes are also explored. This course will cover commonly used vocabulary, a certain number of Chinese characters, basic grammar rules, and practice with Pinyin and tones. There will be greater emphasis on oral skills than on written skills. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation and basic conversation practice in Chinese.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


CHIN 1020 Elementary Chinese II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: Foreign Language (FL)
Description: This course is a continuation of CHIN 1010 and provides additional exposure to the Chinese language and the cultures of Chinese-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed CHIN 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Chinese in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Chinese at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in Chinese, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.
Prerequisites: CHIN 1010 or equivalent or permission of instructor
Corequisites: None


CHIN 2950 Undergraduate Tutoring
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:0:3-6)

Description: This course is for students with native or advanced proficiency in Chinese who wish to use their knowledge to help other students review, strengthen, and apply language skills taught in all Chinese courses at Snow College. This includes both conversation practice and grammar instruction. Tutors may be asked to proofread documents, grade quizzes or homework, provide feedback, and perform other small tasks as directed by the instructor. Tutors will receive training and support from the instructor.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval and advanced proficiency in Chinese.
Corequisites: None.


CIS 1060 IT Project Management
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: Students will gain a practical understanding of IT Project Management principles mapped to the CompTIA Project+ certification. Students will gain knowledge and skills required to manage the project lifecycle, ensure appropriate and timely communication, manage project resources and stakeholders, and maintain project documentation.


CIS 1125 IT Essentials
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course discusses the history, role, and structure of computer architecture and operating systems needed by computers and provides an introduction to the computer hardware and software skills needed to help meet the growing demand for entry-level computer technicians. The curriculum covers the fundamentals of computer hardware and software as well as advanced concepts in security, networking, and computer technician responsibilities. Lab exercises include assembling a computer, laptop, and troubleshooting problems. The course prepares students for the CompTIA A+ certification exam. (Additional fee required)


CIS 1140 Network Essentials
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: In this course, students will learn the basic concepts and prerequisites of network computing, including hardware, software, topologies, and the Open Systems Interface (OSI) reference model. Additionally, students will install, configure, and troubleshoot computer networking hardware and software.


CIS 1200 Introduction to Networks
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and network operations. Students will build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes. (Additional fee required)


CIS 1205 Routing and Switching Essentials
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality, including topics in troubleshooting routers, switches, RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. (Additional fee required)


CIS 1310 Network Security Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of network security concepts. Students will become familiar with network attackers and their attacks, security basics, network and web security, cryptography, operational security, and policies and procedures related to network security.


CIS 1620 Linux Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of the Linux OS and Linux networking concepts. Students will become familiar with Linux installation, usage, file system, management of GUI interface and networking processes, troubleshooting, and security.
Prerequisites: CIS 1125


CIS 1999 Cooperative Education Experience
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-6:0:2-12)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in the classroom to actual job experience. Classroom instruction must precede the job experience or the student must be registered for courses at the same time the student is enrolled in the work experience. (A maximum of 12 semester credits may be applied to graduation.)
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Corequisites: N/A


CIS 2200 Scaling Networks in the Enterprise
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in large and complex networks. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. Students will also be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: CIS 1200 and CIS 1205


CIS 2205 Wide Area Networking Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: CIS 1200 and CIS 1205


CIS 2210 Cisco ROUTE: Implementing IP Routing
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course will teach students how to plan, configure, and verify the implementation of complex enterprise LAN and WAN routing solutions, using a range of routing protocols in IPv4 and IPv6 environments. Students will obtain the knowledge and skills needed to plan, implement, monitor, secure, maintain, and troubleshoot converged enterprise networks. The student will also be able to configure a secure routing solution to support branch offices and mobile workers. Comprehensive labs emphasize hands-on learning and practice to reinforce configuration skills.
Prerequisites: CIS 1205


CIS 2215 Cisco SWITCH: Implementing IP Switching
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course teaches students how to implement, monitor, and maintain switching in converged enterprise networks. Students will learn how to plan, configure, and verify the implementation of complex enterprise switching solutions. The course also covers the secure integration of VLANs, WLANs, voice, and video into enterprise networks. Comprehensive labs emphasize hands-on learning and practice to reinforce configuration skills.
Prerequisites: CIS 1205


CIS 2220 Cisco TSHOOT: Maintaining and Troubleshooting IP Networks
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course teaches students how to monitor, maintain, and troubleshoot complex enterprise routed and switched IP networks. Skills learned include: planning and execution of regular network maintenance, support and troubleshooting using technology-based processes, and best practices based on systematic and industry recognized approaches. Extensive labs emphasize hands-on learning and practice to reinforce troubleshooting techniques.
Prerequisites: CIS 2210 and CIS 2215


CIS 2250 Cisco VOIP Networking Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: Cisco VOIP Networking Fundamentals teaches students how to maintain and operate a Cisco Unified Communications solution that is based on Cisco Unified Communications Manager, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express, Cisco Unity Connection, and Cisco Unified Presence. This course provides the students with the knowledge and skills to achieve associate-level competency in Cisco Unified Communications. This course introduces the architecture, components, functionalities, and features of Cisco Unified Communications solutions and describes how daily job tasks, such as system monitoring, moves, adds, and changes are performed on Cisco Unified Communications Manager, Cisco Unified Communications Manager Express, Cisco Unity Connection, and Cisco Unified Presence.
Prerequisites: CIS 1205


CIS 2300 Cisco Wireless Networking Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of a Cisco based wireless network. Students will become familiar with wireless network planning, designing, installation, and configuration. Students will become familiar with wireless standards and concepts covering security and troubleshooting.
Prerequisites: CIS 1205


CIS 2800 Special Projects
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:0:3-6)

Description: This course involves a special project where there is a demonstrated need which cannot be met through enrollment in a regularly scheduled course. It also could include special projects of unusual merit in furthering a student's professional and academic goals. Students must be able to sustain and complete independent learning projects. The course provides a framework for developing and enhancing student abilities. The Special Projects Contract must be completed, and will indicate the department through which credit will be awarded. Special projects for one credit can be approved by the advisor, the division dean, and the division representative to the Curriculum Committee. Projects for more than one credit must be approved by the advisor, division dean, and Curriculum Committee. Credit for a special project normally should be one to two credit hours depending on the work completed, but may be more with approval of the dean and Curriculum Committee. Unless approved in the contract, special project credit may not be used to satisfy general education requirements. Repeatable for credit. (This course is equivalent to GNST 2800.)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CJ 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course will explore the history, processes, and functions of the American Criminal Justice System this will include law enforcement, the courts, corrections, and the basic theories and procedures of criminal justice in America and its impact on Human Behavior.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


CJ 1300 Introduction to Corrections
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Introduction to Corrections will provide the student with a comprehensive examination of the main aspects of Corrections in America. The course of study will include a historical perspective, a demographic examination, and a study of correctional practices within the major correctional institutions of the American communities. This course is offered as in-class, online and concurrent enrollment.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CJ 1330 Criminal Law
Semester(s) Taught: Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course considers several basic areas of the criminal law, including the origins of the criminal code, court structure, present elements of many various offenses, social considerations, community impact and offender consequences. This course is offered as in-class and online.


CJ 1340 Introduction to Criminal Investigation
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: The course will cover and present the conceptual, philosophical, and practical/ legal/ procedural aspects of Criminal Investigations within the criminal justice framework. This course is offered as in-class and online.


CJ 1350 Introduction to Forensic Science
Semester(s) Taught: Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course will explore the history, evolution and modern day processes of the techniques employed in scientific criminal investigation. This course is offered as in-class and online.


CJ 1997 Internships
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on experiences in Criminal Justice. Internships are an opportunity for students to link theory with practice. They are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the workplace. Internships are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a faculty member in the chosen discipline and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.


CJ 2020 Criminal Justice Supervision
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to introduce the student to the actual processes of supervision in the Criminal Justice System. The course will provide a hands-on experience through some of the problem-solving processes used in emergency, incident command and task force situations. This course is for students interested in careers in law enforcement, adult or juvenile corrections, private or industrial security, law, social work, or psychology. The task force assignments will help the student to understand how to work with and supervise other agencies in areas such as treatment vs. punishment and the psychology of thinking errors and crime.; The course covers principles of supervision, including motivation, discipline, evaluation, scheduling, work assignments, stress management, delegation and observation.; This course instruction will include lectures, videos, guest lectures, and practical problem solving.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


CJ 2110 Introduction To Security
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course surveys the principles and concepts of physical security, crime prevention and control. General examination of security functions and various components.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CJ 2330 Juvenile Justice
Semester(s) Taught: Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course will explore the history, processes, and functions of the Juvenile Justice System including law enforcement, the courts, corrections, and the basic theories and procedures of the Juvenile Justice System. This course is offered as in-class and online.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


CJ 2350 Laws of Evidence
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: A study of the origin, development and philosophy of the rules of evidence; weight, value and types of evidence; some discussion concerning reliability and tests of admissibility; the law concerning various types of witnesses; and the laws of arrest, search, seizure and other evidence. This course is offered as in-class and online.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: CJ 1340 Criminal Investigations


CJ 2997 Internships
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on experiences in Criminal Justice. Internships are an opportunity for students to link theory with practice. They are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the workplace. Internships are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a faculty member in the chosen discipline and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.


CLA 1269 Catering
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:4)

Description: This course is designed to involve students in planning, preparation and setup of catering services from small dinner parties to large banquets. Food presentation and garnishing are also covered in this course.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CLA 1301 Culinary Arts I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is an orientation to culinary arts, safety, sanitation, basic equipment, basic cooking principles and recipes. Lab experiences will be provided as students rotate through stations. This course is a prerequisite for CLA 1401.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CLA 1303 Baking and Pastries I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This course teaches basic principles and ingredients of baking yeast products, quick breads, cakes and icings, cookies, pies and puddings. This course is a prerequisite for CLA 1403.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CLA 1305 Hot Food Preparation I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This course covers basic preparation of stocks, sauces, soups, meats, poultry, fish, vegetables and starches. This course is a prerequisite for CLA 1405.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CLA 1306 Short Order Cooking I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This course covers basic preparation of sandwiches, grilled items and fried foods. This course is a prerequisite for CLA 1406.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CLA 1307 Cold Food Preparation I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This course covers the basic preparation of salads and salad dressings. Lab experiences will be provided as students rotate through stations. This course is a prerequisite for CLA 1407.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CLA 1401 Culinary Arts II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course covers menu planning and development and food preparation. Lab experiences will be provided as students rotate through stations.
Prerequisites: CLA 1301
Corequisites: N/A


CLA 1403 Baking and Pastries II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This course covers the preparation and presentation of pastries, creams and sauces.
Prerequisites: CLA 1303
Corequisites: N/A


CLA 1405 Hot Food Preparation II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This course is a continuation of CLA 1305, but will include more advanced entrees, stocks, soups, sauces and some international cuisine.
Prerequisites: CLA 1305
Corequisites: N/A


CLA 1406 Short Order Cooking II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This course covers advanced techniques in preparation of specialty sandwiches, grilling and deep frying work, including proper organization.
Prerequisites: CLA 1306
Corequisites: N/A


CLA 1407 Cold Food Preparation II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This course will teach the student to prepare specialty salads and more advanced dressings. It will also introduce the preparation of hors d'oeuvres.
Prerequisites: CLA 1307
Corequisites: N/A


CM 1040 Architecture-Residential Design
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: The emphasis of this course is comprehensive coverage of design fundamentals and procedures used to represent design ideas using traditional, as well as state of the art technology. It covers the solving of problems related to the design of a residential structure and considers the influence of building cost, modular applications, building codes, and zoning regulations with respect to the site and design. This course will introduce CAD software. This course was formerly DRFT 1100.


CM 1155 Construction Print Reading (formerly Blueprint Reading)
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: In this course, students learn the symbols, terms, specifications, relationships of views, measurements, sections, and details for proper interpretation of plans used for residential and light commercial buildings.


CM 1200 Building Science Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course will cover essential building science principles that enable students to construct buildings that are safe, comfortable to live in, energy efficient, and functional for many years.Students will learn how to apply building science principles to new construction and how to apply the same principles to remodeling existing homes.Principles of sustainability are incorporated throughout this course.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 1210 Construction Technologies Lab I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:6)

Description: This course is a hands-on construction lab experience where students will learn the training necessary to allow them to be employable in a construction-related field and to perform required duties safely. Each semester students will participate in available projects as determined by the instructor. The projects will vary from semester to semester based on local need and student interest.


CM 1280 Plumbing Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course includes the study of plumbing fundamentals and is a familiarization course for carpenters to aid them in coordinating their work with that of the mechanical work performed by the plumber. It includes practical experience in plumbing a project house and code compliance. This is a half semester course.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 1290 Residential Electrical Wiring
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: In this course, students receive instruction on the fundamentals of wiring a residential home with emphasis on electrical code and safety requirements. The course includes actual practical electrical wiring experience.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 1300 Facilities Management Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: The emphasis of this course covers the fundaments of facilities management and procedures. It covers structure, operations and maintenance programs pertaining to facilities and emphasizes the need for the facilities manager to be a business leader. This course includes administration, management and leadership of the facility function and introduces finance, accounting, repair, security, planning, budgeting and real estate administration.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


CM 1710 Construction Technologies Lab II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:6)

Description: This course is a hands-on construction lab experience where students will learn the training necessary to allow them to be employable in a construction-related field and to perform required duties safely. Each semester students will participate in available projects as determined by the instructor. The projects will vary from semester to semester based on local need and student interest


CM 1910 NAHB Club
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: NAHB is an abbreviation of the official name for the National Association of Home Builders. This is a national student club which provides its members an opportunity to develop leadership skills through various assignments, social activities, serving as club officers, serving on committees, participating in service projects, and establishing professional goals in the construction industry. Snow College's student chapter is sponsored by Utah Valley Home Builders Association in Orem.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 1920 NAHB Club
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: NAHB is an abbreviation of the official name for the National Association of Home Builders. This is a national student club which provides its members an opportunity to develop leadership skills through various assignments, social activities, serving as club officers, serving on committees, participating in service projects, and establishing professional goals in the construction industry. Snow College's student chapter is sponsored by Utah Valley Home Builders Association in Orem.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 1997 Construction Internship
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:0-0:1-3)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on work experience in building construction and construction management fields. Internships are an opportunity for students to link theory with practical experience. They are also designed to help students network with professionals, increasing their opportunities to receive full-time employment after graduation. Internships can introduce students to multiple professions within the construction industry, helping them narrow down their specific areas of interest. They are temporary, on the job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to workplace experiences. Internships are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a construction management faculty member and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Each credit requires 45 clock hours of internship experience. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a letter grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.


CM 1999 Cooperative Education Experience
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-6:0:2-12)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in the classroom to actual job experience. Classroom instruction must precede the job experience or the student must be registered for courses at the same time the student is enrolled in the work experience.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2010 Framing Methods
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:3:6)

Description: This course provides practical hands-on learning experiences in layout procedures and erection of floor, wall, ceiling, stairs, and roof construction of a residential house. The course includes a study of the various kinds of insulations and their applications on the project house.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2020 Materials and Methods I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course covers the practical theory of residential structures and the construction process methods and materials used.


CM 2030 Materials and Methods II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course covers the practical theory of commercial structures and the construction process methods and materials used.


CM 2050 Building Layout and Concrete Construction
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: Instruction covers zoning, ordinance, code permit, grade, and property line requirements needed to place a building on a lot. Instruction also includes principles of quality conrete with construction of footings, foundation walls, flatwork, and steps.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2100 Interior Finish
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:3:6)

Description: This course covers the cutting, fitting, hanging, and taping of sheetrock on a project house. It covers the cutting, fitting, and applying of various kinds of trim for doors, windows, walls, and ceilings. It also includes interior painting, cabinet installation, door hanging and other procedures required to finish the interior of a residential home. Energy efficient methods of air sealing, insulation procedures, and indoor air quality are also covered.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2150 Cabinet Construction
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course provides instruction in the principles and procedures used in the design, layout, and construction of cabinets for a residential home. It includes practical experiences in building quality cabinets for a residential home. The course also includes a familiarization of tools, materials, and process of the woodworking industry with an emphasis on safety.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2160 Exterior Finish
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:4)

Description: This course provides instruction in the selection and methods of application of various kinds of exterior wall and cornice finish.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2210 Construction Technologies Lab III
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:6)

Description: This course is a hands-on construction lab experience where students will learn the training necessary to allow them to be employable in a construction-related field and to perform required duties safely. Each semester students will participate in available projects as determined by the instructor. The projects will vary from semester to semester based on local need and student interest


CM 2275 Construction Codes and Zoning (formerly CM 2270)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course provides an introduction to the practical applications of the Uniform Building Code especially inspection procedures and requirements for residential and light commercial construction. The National Green Building Standard will also be part of this course of study.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2300 Advanced Computerized Estimating and Job Cost Accounting
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course focuses on computerized applications in construction estimating and job cost accounting. It emphasizes use of computers for productivity and integration of estimating and job costing for effective cost control. Course content includes typical business workflow from setup to final financial statements.
Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in a basic accounting course is recommended. Prior completion of CM 1100 or equivalent or permission of instructor is required.
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2356 Special Topics in Construction
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:0:3-9)

Description: This course provides practical application of skills where additional experience and practice are desired; such as, on-the-job training, carpentry projects, and extra study in specialized areas of the building industry. Approval of a project is coordinated with instructor prior to enrollment in this repeatable course. (This is not an internship.)


CM 2460 Construction Scheduling and Cost Control
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course provides instruction in the planning and scheduling of construction projects. Students learn construction project control through use of critical path, Gantt bar charts, and reporting practices making paper charts and using project software.


CM 2610 Architectural Drafting CAD
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: An introduction to architectural design and working drawings. The class will study architectural practices, procedures, symbology, dimensioning techniques, standards and terminology. Practical applications in planning and functional design and working drawings.


CM 2636 Architectural Blacksmithing
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1.5:1:1)

Description: This course is a hands-on workshop for traditional building skills of architectural blacksmithing. The course includes the philosophy of historic ironwork and the reproduction of forged hardware; such as, hinges, latches, hooks and various tools. The participants will learn the use of a coal forge and a gas forge, forging processes, tool heat treating and weld forging. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2660 Entry and Passage Door Construction
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:5)

Description: This course provides hands-on technical training on how to build raised panel entry and passage doors for residential homes. During the course students will build the doors for the Snow College project house.


CM 2690 Woodworking Technology
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course is a wood project construction course with experience in milling, assembling, and designing of wood projects. Emphasis is placed on layout and construction techniques. The instruction in the making of high-end furniture, including the various types of joinery and finishes will be covered.


CM 2710 Construction Technologies Lab IV
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:6)

Description: This course is a hands-on construction lab experience where students will learn the training necessary to allow them to be employable in a construction-related field and to perform required duties safely. Each semester the student will participate in available projects as determined by the instructor. The projects will vary from semester to semester based on local need and student interest


CM 2850 Construction Math and Estimating (formerly CM 1100)
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: In this course, students learn to compute quantities of materials, cost of materials, labor, and other costs related to a residential building.
Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CM 1150 or CM 2010, or previous residential construction experience or equivalent.
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2910 NAHB Club
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: NAHB is an abbreviation of the official name for the National Association of Home Builders. This is a national student club which provides its members an opportunity to develop leadership skills through various assignments, social activities, serving as club officers, serving on committees, participating in service projects, and establishing professional goals in the construction industry. Snow College's student chapter is sponsored by Utah Valley Home Builders Association in Orem.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2920 NAHB Club
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: NAHB is an abbreviation of the official name for the National Association of Home Builders. This is a national student club which provides its members an opportunity to develop leadership skills through various assignments, social activities, serving as club officers, serving on committees, participating in service projects, and establishing professional goals in the construction industry. Snow College's student chapter is sponsored by Utah Valley Home Builders Association in Orem.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


CM 2999 Cooperative Education Experience
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-6:0:2-12)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in the classroom to actual job experience. Classroom instruction must precede the job experience or the student must be registered for courses at the same time the student is enrolled in the work experience.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Corequisites: N/A


CMP 1000 Composite Basics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course covers introductory topics in general composite manufacturing including composite equipment, materials, methods, and processes for proper and quality assured composite production. (formerly MANF 1400)


CMP 1100 Mold Preparation and Tooling
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course covers the basic procedures and processes for mold preparation, composite materials tooling, and mold release agents.


CMP 1200 Composite Core, Prepreg, and Matrix Materials
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course covers the basic procedures and processes for manufacturing composite core, prepreg, and matrix material composite products.


CMP 1300 Vacuum Bag Processes
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course covers the basic procedures and processes for performing single-sided vacuum bagging. The course also covers safety precautions and techniques to prevent common vacuum bag problems.


CMP 1800 Part Finishing/Repair Capstone
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:3:6)

Description: This capstone course covers processes and procedures used in composite parts finishing and repairing. The course also covers advanced composite materials, composite structures, and manufacturing processes.
Prerequisites: CMP 1000, CMP 1100, CMP 1200, CMP 1300
Corequisites: None


COMM 1010 Introduction to Communication
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This introductory course investigates principles of communication theories and how to use these theories in practical application. The course content encourages students to analyze, assess and evaluate communication principles. Students will develop skills and techniques essential to effective communication in settings that include; intrapersonal (with oneself), interpersonal (face-to-face), small group and public speaking. Students will develop the ability to look at the big picture of human communicate and how it affects each individual's perception, cultural traditions and human philosophy.


COMM 1020 Public Speaking
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This is a practical and general course designed for students who desire to improve their speech efficiency, poise and self-confidence in public address situations. Special emphasis is placed on preparing, selecting, researching, organizing and delivering oral messages as well as on analyzing and evaluating the speaking-listening process.


COMM 1030 Technology Tools for Communicators
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of resources and tools available to communication professionals. It examines media technology, databases, software and techniques applied by professionals to transform data into useful formats for the strategic decision-making process. Contents focus on technology tools for digital media marketing, production and distribution. It requires extensive use of the Internet, public and professional database, specialized software, such as Adobe and other technology resources.


COMM 1045 Beginning Film Production
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This is a course that introduces you to basic digital filmmaking production and procedures utilizing digital video systems. Emphasis on fundamental technical knowledge, film theory, camera and editing techniques, and script development. Short dramatic or documentary group projects as well as individual projects.
Prerequisites: N/A


COMM 1130 Media Writing
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Students in this course will learn how to gather and evaluate information to craft stories for the broad public. This course teaches the core skills of news judgment, news writing, basic reporting and editing, feature writing, law and ethics --- and covering news from diverse communities.


COMM 1385 Intermediate TV Production
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-4:1:3-6)

Description: For Communication majors and other students interested in a hands-on experience working with the local Community Television Channel (Snow TV) on any of its production projects. Includes basic television production skills for college and local community and government events. Students work a minimum number of hours based on the credits for which they register: 3 hours per week for 1 credit, 6 hours per week for 2 credits, or 9 hours per week for 3 credits. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions.
Prerequisites: COMM 2200 and/or instructor approval


COMM 1500 Introduction to Mass Media
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is an introduction into the nature of media and its relationship with the individual. The course teaches students to analyze, assess and evaluate popular culture, literature, and media. It includes a focus on various mediums including literature, radio, television, film, books, newspaper, and advertising to assist students in looking at the big picture of how media affects their perceptions.;


COMM 1560 Radio Production
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Radio Production introduces audio production techniques and equipment operation, ; including terminology, basic script writing, editing, producing commercials, public service announcements and newscaster in a studio setting.


COMM 1870 Radio Performance - 1st Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2)

Description: Students contribute to the Snow College student station, KAGE-FM. Lecture and lab situations combine to provide students with the background and skills required to meet the needs of the radio communications industry. Students are exposed to both analog and digital studio systems, including digital multitrack production techniques. Work may include station management, announcing, production of promos, public service announcements, underwriting, news or sports reporting. Emphasis is placed on the ability to operate radio on-air studio and transmission equipment in a professional and legal manner. Students will learn to formulate and prepare both digital and analog radio production elements. (Additional fee required)


COMM 1880 Radio Performance - 1st Year
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2)

Description: Students contribute to the Snow College student station, KAGE-FM. Lecture and lab situations combine to provide students with the background and skills required to meet the needs of the radio communications industry. Students are exposed to both analog and digital studio systems, including digital multitrack production techniques. Work may include station management, announcing, production of promos, public service announcements, underwriting, news or sports reporting. Students will learn to create and organize a professional-quality radio portfolio consisting of a broadcast aircheck, production samples, resume, and related materials. Emphasis will be placed on voice, performance and adapting to an audience. (Additional fee required)


COMM 1900 Newspaper Production I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: Students will learn the theory and practical application of newspaper design, production, and reporting through classroom instruction and hands-on production as staff members of the Snowdrift, Snow College's student newspaper.


COMM 1910 Newspaper Production I
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: Students have the opportunity to engage in an in-depth examination of Journalism and the news writing and design processes. Students are responsible for the planning design, and publication of the Snowdrift, Snow College's student newspaper. This production process will involve feature writing, page/graphic design, typesetting, and business management.


COMM 2070 Oral Interpretation of Literature
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: Oral Interpretation of Literature is designed to introduce students to the art of performance and visual communication. It focuses on how to research and find literature with cultural significance that appeals to the audience and engages the performer through a theatrical, creative process. Students will develop the voice and performance techniques used for public performance and media presentations.


COMM 2080 Intercollegiate Forensics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: Intercollegiate Forensics is a class designed to give credit to communication students working on forensic team-related projects. Participants will be expected to create polished, competitive speeches for presentations throughout the nation. The class is repeatable for up to 12 credits.


COMM 2110 Interpersonal Communication
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Oral Communication (OC)
Description: The study of interpersonal communication is the study of interaction between people. It is not only the conversation, but the study of relationships, problems, and situations and how they can be dealt with in an effective manner. This course is designed to study interpersonal communication from a descriptive as well as analytical point of view. The topics of interpersonal relationships, self-concept, perception, emotions, verbal and nonverbal language, listening, intimacy, climate, and conflict will be discussed. Possible methods of enhancing interpersonal communication situations will be practiced through discussion, role play, writing, critical evaluation, feedback and observance.


COMM 2150 Intercultural Communication
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: Intercultural Communication is a study of the ways people communicate within and between cultures, including a consideration of cultural contexts and the relationship between culture and communication. This class is aimed at developing a greater understanding about diversity and the intercultural aspect of everyday life. Intercultural diversity is present everywhere and understanding some of the cultural influence helps individuals gain acceptance and tolerance of other cultures.


COMM 2170 Organizational Communication
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Oral Communication (OC)
Description: This course introduces the various perspectives on organizational communication, as manifested in the theories, principles, and practices which predominate in modern organizations. Special emphasis is placed on preparing and organizing various types of oral presentations and communication strategies for organizations.


COMM 2180 Photojournalism
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: Photojournalism is a form of visual communication that documents the emotions, drama, suspense, and exhilaration of real-life events and people for diverse media outlets, including print and electronic media. As artists and storytellers, photojournalists create images that document our culture. These images capture both the momentous and the everyday circumstances of contemporary life and society. This course will teach students to understand photography as a form of visual communication, as they address aspects of photograph such as formal composition, narrative elements, aperture, shutter speed, power of color, dramatics of black/white, and more. The photographs taken in the course may be used for the school newspaper. DSLR camera is required.


COMM 2200 TV Production
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course will emphasize practical application of TV production. Students will learn the elements of video production, editing techniques and writing skills particular to broadcast journalism. They will use a field video camera and post-production editing equipment to produce individual and team assignments.


COMM 2250 Intermediate TV Production
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1:3-9)

Description: For Communication majors and other students interested in a hands-on experience working with the local Community Television Channel (Snow TV) on any of its production projects. Includes basic television production skills for college and local community and government events. Students work a minimum number of hours based on the credits for which they register: 3 hours per week for 1 credit, 6 hours per week for 2 credits, or 9 hours per week for 3 credits. Repeatable up to 6 credits subject to graduation restrictions. Formerly COMM 1385
Prerequisites: COMM 2200 and/or instructor approval


COMM 2270 Argumentation and Debate
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Students learn basic principles of argumentation and their application to communication and to debate. Analysis of current social issues, evidence and reasoning, refutation, ethics, strategy, and delivery are included in course work. Students will develop their research abilities, critical thinking skills, and oral communication skills.


COMM 2280 Photojournalism 2
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course emphasizes the use and function of photographs in the various print media. Students will complete assignments that may be submitted for publication in student publications.The market for stories communicated visually has never been strongr. Photographs presented alone or as an essay in a multimedia contest, continue to provide student photojournalsits a unique opportunity to present their work.Instruction will progress from basic camera operation and the news one shot to more comprehensive visul storytelling that may incorporate audio, video or other multimedia compnents.


COMM 2300 Introduction to Public Relations
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Oral Communication (OC)
Description: This course introduces various perspectives on public relations, as manifested in the theories, methods, principles, and practices which predominate in the field. Special emphasis is placed on preparing and organizing various types of oral presentations appropriate to the field.


COMM 2560 Radio Performance II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2)

Description: Students contribute to the Snow College student station, KAGE-FM. This is a senior staff level class, which provides leadership opportunities to 2nd year staff members. Lecture and lab situations combine to provide students with the background and skills required to meet the needs of the radio communications industry. Students are exposed to to both analog and digital studio systems, including digital multitrack production techniques. Work may include station management, announcing, production of promos, public service announcements, underwriting, news or sports reporting. (Additional fee required)


COMM 2850 Special Topics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This course is designed to address a special topic associated with the discipline that may not be included as a part of the normal curriculum.; Topics may be extensions of current field of study or it may include possible future additions to the departmental curriculum.


COMM 2870 Radio Performance - 2nd Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2)

Description: Students contribute to the Snow College student station, KAGE-FM. This is a senior staff level class, which provides leadership opportunities to 2nd year staff members. Lecture and lab situations combine to provide students with the background and skills required to meet the needs of the radio communications industry. Students are exposed to to both analog and digital studio systems, including digital multitrack production techniques. Work may include station management, announcing, production of promos, public service announcements, underwriting, news or sports reporting. (Additonal fee required)


COMM 2880 Radio Performance - 2nd Year
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2)

Description: Students contribute to the Snow College student station, KAGE-FM. This is a senior staff level class, which provides leadership opportunities to 2nd year staff members. Lecture and lab situations combine to provide students with the background and skills required to meet the needs of the radio communications industry. Students are exposed to to both analog and digital studio systems, including digital multitrack production techniques. Work may include station management, announcing, production of promos, public service announcements, underwriting, news or sports reporting. Students will learn to create and organize a professional-quality radio portfolio consisting of a broadcast aircheck, production samples, resume, and related materials. Emphasis will be placed on voice, performance and adapting to an audience. (Additional fee required)


COMM 2900 Newspaper Production II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: Senior staff students will practice the theory and application of newspaper design, production, and reporting as staff members and student editors of the Snowdrift, Snow College's student newspaper. Senior staff will work as mentors, student instructors, and be responsible for newspaper production.
Prerequisites: COMM 1900 or COMM 1910


COMM 2910 Newspaper Production 2
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: Senior staff students have the opportunity to lead and assist with instruction as students engage in an in-depth examination of Journalism and new writing processes.; Senior staff will help in planning design and publication of the student newspaper.; This production process will involve feature writing, page/graphic design, typesetting and business management.;
Prerequisites: Comm 1910


COSB 1000 Basic Cosmetology Theory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This theory course presents basic cosmetology practices, demonstrations of technical procedures, practical application of cosmetology skills, and identifies the responsibilities of the cosmetologist. Critical thinking skills will also be developed. Students will demonstrate competency through written tests and skills pass-off working on mannequins. This course prepares students for working with the public in the salon lab. This course is part of a required series to prepare students to take the National Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology Licensure Examination (NIC test). Students must be accepted into the Cosmetology/Barbering program to take this course.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: COSB 1005, COSB 1015, COSB 1100


COSB 1005 Basic Cosmetology Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:0:15)

Description: This lab course with the Basic Barbering Lab course are the main lab components for the COSB 1000 series. Lab instruction and practice are an integral part of this program. Practice and lab experiences include shampooing, scalp and hair treatments, manicuring, pedicuring, artificial nails, haircutting, hairstyling, chemical texture, facials, makeup application, hair coloring, hair lightening, shaving, waxing, and hair extension applications.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: COSB 1000, COSB 1015, and COSB 1100


COSB 1015 Basic Barbering Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:0:12)

Description: This lab course with the Basic Cosmetology Lab course are the main lab components for the COSB 1000 series. Lab instruction and practice are an integral part of this program. This course covers practical experience in the area of shampooing and scalp treatments, manicures and facials, all types of men's haircuts, hair and beard design, care and styling of hairpieces, and straight razor shaving with an emphasis on all barber specific services.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: COSB 1000, COSB 1005, COSB 1100


COSB 1100 Basic Barbering Theory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course presents barbering theory for the following subjects: history of barbering, barber implements, tools and equipment, shaving and facial design, men's styling, and haircutting.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: COSB 1000, COSB 1005, and COSB 1015


COSB 1200 Cosmetology/Barbering Sciences and Procedures
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course presents cosmetology/barbering theory for the following subjects: history of cosmetology, infection control, general anatomy and physiology, skin structure and growth, nail structure and growth, properties of hair and scalp, basics of chemistry and an introduction to the State Laws of Cosmetology/Barbering.
Prerequisites: COSB 1000, COSB 1100, COSB 1005, and COSB 1015; COSB 1205 and COSB 1215 (both of which can be taken concurrently)


COSB 1205 Intermediate Cosmetology Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3-6:0:9-18)

Description: Students completing the COSB 1000 series will take this course in preparation to work on clients. Lab instruction and practice are an integral part of this program. This course offers hands-on experience in manicuring, pedicuring, massage, facials, facial makeup, removal of unwanted hair by tweezing and waxing, hair extension application, shampooing, draping, finger waving, roller sets, thermal curling, braiding, haircoloring, hair lightening, chemical texture services, care of wigs, and haircutting.
Prerequisites: COSB 1000, COSB 1005, COSB 1015, and COSB 1100; and COSB 1200 and COSB 1215 (both of which can be taken concurrently)


COSB 1215 Intermediate Barbering Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2-4:0:6-12)

Description: Lab instruction and practice are an integral part of this program. This lab course provides practical experience with general hair care, draping, shampooing, scalp treatment, men specific manicuring, pedicuring, facials, haircutting, straight razor shaving, beard and mustache trimming. A student will also gain lab experience in chemical texture services, esthetic procedures and make-up application, braiding, hair extension applications, hairstyling including, finger waving, roller sets and thermal curling, haircoloring, and hair lightening. Students have the opportunity to work on clients in a salon setting. This course requires a nonrefundable lab fee.
Prerequisites: COSB 1000, COSB 1005, COSB 1015, and COSB 1100; and COSB 1200 and COSB 1205 (both of which can be taken concurrently).


COSB 1519 Cosmetology/Barbering Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-6:0-0:3-18)

Description: Lab instruction and practice are an integral part of this program. This course covers principles and practices of manicuring, pedicuring, application of nail enhancements, facials, facial makeup, removal of unwanted hair by tweezing and waxing, hair extension application, shampooing, draping, finger waving, roller sets, thermal curling, braiding, haircoloring, hair lightening, chemical relaxing, care of wigs, hairstyling, permanent waving, and haircutting. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: With Instructor approval
Corequisites: N/A


COSB 1581 SkillsUSA - Level 1
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This is the first course in a series of four which helps students gain and improve workplace and interpersonal skills. Leadership and service opportunities are a foundation of this program. Students participating in this program will be members of and participate in the SkillsUSA career and professional leadership organization.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


COSB 1582 SkillsUSA - Level 2
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This is the second course in a series of four which helps students gain and improve workplace and interpersonal skills. Leadership and service opportunities are a foundation of this program. Students participating in this program will be members of and participate in the SkillsUSA career and professional leadership organization.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


COSB 1810 Theory of Nail Technology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This course covers principles and concepts of the nail technology profession, including: manicuring, pedicuring, sanitation, disorders and diseases of the skin and nails, body chemistry, product safety, related anatomy and physiology, methods of artificial nail applications, problem solving, professional ethics, business management, and state laws.
Corequisites: COSB 1811


COSB 1811 Nail Technology Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (6:0:18)

Description: A student taking this course and COSB 1810 will be ready to license and go to work in one semester. The Nail Technology program can be taken alone or as part of the Cosmetology/Barbering program. Lab instruction and practice are an integral part of this program. Practice and lab experiences include client consultation; manicuring; pedicuring; application of nail tips, wraps, gel and acrylic enhancements; polishing techniques; nail art; and salon management. A required lab fee includes a one-time rental of a stateboard testing kit. This fee is non-refundable.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: COSB 1810


COSB 1910 Professional Development I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is designed to prepare the student for the job market, learning skills in time management, goal setting, ethics and professional dress. The importance of working and communicating with others, healthy habits and a positive attitude are discussed.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


COSB 1920 Professional Development II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course in connection with COSB 1910 will prepare the student for the job market, learning skills in employment opportunities, public speaking, job application, employment portfolios, focusing on mentoring, money management and leadership skills.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: COSB 1910


COSB 2300 Disciplines and Principles of Cosmetology/Barbering
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This theory course covers in-depth the disciplines and principles of the following subjects; Barbering history and opportunities, straight razor shaving and haircutting techniques, basics of electricity, electrotherapy and light therapy, principles of make-up, hair design, braiding, hair extensions and the care of wigs, all aspects of haircoloring, skin and nail diseases and disorders, safety and infection control.
Prerequisites: COSB 1000, COSB 1005, COSB 1100, COSB 1015, COSB 1200, COSB 1205, and COSB 1215; and COSB 2305 and COSB 2315 (both of which can be taken concurrently).


COSB 2305 Advanced Cosmetology Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3-6:0:9-18)

Description: In this course, students learn highly marketable skills in preparing for licensure and working in the profession of cosmetology. Students are challenged to serve in the community, to achieve senior student status, and becoming mentors to their fellow peers. Lab instruction and practice are an integral part of this program. This course provides in-depth practical experience in learning and achieving advanced techniques in all areas essential to becoming a successful cosmetologist/barber. Students perform services in a salon setting. This course has a service learning component. This course requires a nonrefundable lab fee.
Prerequisites: COSB 1000, COSB 1005, COSB 1015, COSB 1100, COSB 1200, COSB 1205, COSB 1215; and COSB 2300, COSB 2315, COSB 2505 (these three can be taken concurrently).


COSB 2315 Advanced Barbering Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2-4:0:6-12)

Description: Barbering is an exciting component in the Cosmetology/Barbering program. Imagine days from the old west, where a gentlemen could get a straight razor shave. This is just one of the services a student will learn in this lab course. This course provides in-depth practical experience in learning and achieving advanced techniques in all areas essential to becoming a successful cosmetologist/barber. Students perform services in a salon setting. This course has a service learning component.
Prerequisites: COSB 1000 COSB 1005, COSB 1015, COSB 1100, COSB 1200, COSB 1205, and COSB 1215; and COSB 2300, COSB 2305, and COSB 2505 (the three of these can be taken concurrently).


COSB 2505 Cosmetology/Barbering Capstone
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: Lab instruction and practice are an essential part of this program. This capstone course allows students to complete the last 1-100 hours of the mandated 1600 clock hours by the State of Utah. Students are prepared to take the National Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology Licensure Examination (NIC test) and apply for licensure.
Prerequisites: Must have Instructor approval
Corequisites: N/A


COSB 2519 Advanced Cosmetology/Barbering Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-6:-0:3-15)

Description: Lab instruction and practice are an integral part of this program. This course covers practical experience with shampooing, scalp treatments, manicuring, pedicuring, nail enhancements, haircutting, hairstyling, permanent waving, facials, massaging, esthetic procedures, hair extension applications, care and styling of wigs, haircoloring, chemical relaxing, hair lightening, retail sales, appointment booking, and phone skills. Students perform services in a salon setting. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Upon instructor's approval.
Corequisites: N/A


COSB 2709 Cosmetology/Barbering/Nail Technology Student Instructor
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (8-16:2:16)

Description: This course prepares the student for state examinations as a Cosmetology/Barbering/Nail Technology instructor. It includes experience in teaching theory and lab. The State of Utah requires 1000 hours of instruction in preparation for licensing as an instructor. The department chairperson's permission is required prior to enrolling. Students must have at least one year of work experience as a licensed cosmetologist/barber before taking this course. Instructor licensure requirements are such that a student will be required to take this course at least twice. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Cosmetology/Barbering License and one year of work experience
Corequisites: N/A


CS 1030 Computer Science Principles
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Science Inquiry (SI)
Description: This course is intended to expose students to the computer science discipline. This course covers a broad range of foundational topics such as programming, algorithms, the Internet, big data, digital privacy and security, and the societal impacts of computing. There are hands-on activities in the computer lab, but this is not a skills course or an in-depth programming course.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 and MATH 1050
Corequisites: N/A


CS 1400 Programming Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course introduces the discipline of computing and emphasizes problem-solving and programming. Considerable time is devoted to learning how to solve problems using a current programming language. Basic principles of program design and implementation are introduced.
Prerequisites: MATH 1050
Corequisites: CS 1405


CS 1405 Programming Fundamentals Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This laboratory provides the hands-on experience necessary to begin to develop correct programming practices. It introduces the student to an integrated development environment. It provides the opportunity to apply software fundamentals in an appropriate programming language.
Prerequisites: MATH 1050
Corequisites: CS 1400


CS 1410 Object-Oriented Programming
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course continues the development of the discipline of computing. It introduces the concepts of object-oriented programming. Basic data structures, recursion, and fundamental computing algorithms are introduced.
Prerequisites: CS 1400
Corequisites: CS 1415


CS 1415 Object-Oriented Programming Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This laboratory provides continued experience to develop in depth correct programming practices. It provides the opportunity to apply object-oriented programming concepts and data structures.
Prerequisites: CS 1405
Corequisites: CS 1410


CS 1810 Web Development I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course covers the concepts and practice necessary for creating internet content. The course provides a technical overview of the Internet environment and the structure of the world wide web. The technical segment will focus on the design and implementation of an effective web site at the introductory level.
Prerequisites: CS 1410 (it can be taken concurrently)


CS 1820 Web Development II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course focuses on the concepts and technologies needed to develop web-centric applications. The overall architecture of Internet applications is examined at a high level.
Prerequisites: CS 1810 - Web Development I


CS 2420 Data Structures and Algorithms
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course covers data structures and algorithms in some depth. Topics include data structures, recursion, problem solving strategies, and complexity analysis. Sorting and searching algorithms are covered in detail.
Prerequisites: CS 1410


CS 2450 Introduction to Software Engineering
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Software Engineering is the application of a systematic, disciplined, quantifiable approach to the development, operation, and maintenance of software. This course teaches: how to specify and manage requirements through the use of user stories and use cases; the development of software iteratively and incrementally; unit testing of software; project planning; documentation of work products using Unified Modeling Language (UML) to construct class or sequence diagrams; risk management through the development of a risk list and mitigation strategies; and how to work as a member of a software development team. Students will complete a team-based project that provides the opportunity to practice engineering knowledge, skills, and practices.
Prerequisites: CS 2420


CS 2700 Digital Circuits
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to digital systems, logic gates, combinational logic circuits, and sequential logic circuits. It includes minimization techniques and implementation with encoders, decoders, multiplexers, and programmable logic devices. It considers Mealy and Moore models of state machines, state minimization, and state assignment. It also introduces a hardware description language. This course is cross listed as ENGR 2700.
Prerequisites: MATH 1050


CS 2810 Computer Organization & Architecture
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course introduces organization and architecture of computer systems. Topics include assembly language programming, instruction sets, pipelining, and memory systems.
Prerequisites: CS 2420 AND CS 2700


CS 2830 Web Development III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: The goal of this course is to prepare a student who, as part of his or her career will participate in software development projects that are using Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) also known as cloud computing. IaaS providers such as Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, and others offer a hardware platform that allows companies to deploy their software services to ?virtual server computers?. Many well-known companies and organizations use IaaS including LinkedIn, Netflix, the Center for Disease Control, and many others. These companies avoid heavy expenditures on computer hardware and only pay the IaaS provider for the capacity that is actually used. Software service capability can scale up or down depending on demand. This new model of computing requires software developers to think in new ways. They need to take advantage of the low cost and scalability of IaaS and consider the security implications of this approach. This course is centered around a sequence of Cloud Deployment Projects that will be deployed utilizing Amazon Web Services.
Prerequisites: CS 1820 with a B- or better


CS 2860 Operating Systems
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course will introduce students to the various components which comprise a modern operating system. Such components include processes and threads, memory management, and file systems. This course teaches key theoretical concepts and makes them real by engaging students in the development of practical skills needed to understand and modify operating system code. Case studies include Linux, UNIX, Windows, OS X, Android, and iOS.
Prerequisites: CS 2810
D


DANC 1001 Summer Dance Workshop
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:1-2)

Description: This class is designed for visiting summer school students to help them improve their individual dance technique and performance. Credit is variable, depending on workshop length and instructional hours. Participants must have successfully completed their sophomore year of high school. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


DANC 1010 Introduction to Dance
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:2)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This is both a movement-based and a lecture-based course that introduces students to the art form of dance through active exploration of its many components including ritual, movement, movement composition and performance. Movement-based prompts and games, combined with classroom discussions, will facilitate the exploration of the current state of dance as both a form of creative expression and a social, religious, and cultural practice. Throughout classroom sessions we will be exploring elements of a wide variety of dance styles including ballet, jazz, modern/contemporary technique and improvisation as a preparation for movement projects that are produced, choreographed and presented by students in the course.
Prerequisites: None


DANC 1054 Pilates Mat
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: Based on the pioneering work of Joseph Pilates, this class consists of a series of stretching and strengthening exercises designed to develop muscle tone, flexibility and posture. Repetable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DANC 1100 Ballet I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: This course introduces students to the theory and practice of a beginning classical ballet technique. It emphasizes discipline, posture, alignment, balance and muscular control neccessary for the execution of basic ballet barre and center exercises. Movement is presented by means of demonstration, description and exploration. This course is repeatable for credit.


DANC 1130 Ballet II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: This course introduces students to the theory and practice of intermediate ballet technique. It emphasizes discipline, posture, alignment, balance and muscular control neccessary for the execution of basic ballet barre and center exercises. Movement is presented by means of demonstration, description and exploration. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: DANC 1100 or Permission of Instructor


DANC 1160 Rhythmic Training
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course will take a contemporary approach to creating a common language of musical time from the dancer's and musician's perspectives. It will explore the many links between the worlds of music, rhythm and movement. Learning movement, teaching and creating choreography will be easier and richer.
Prerequisites: None


DANC 1170 American Social Dance I (formerly DANC 1700)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This course teaches beginning-level American Social Dance including Foxtrot, Waltz, Swing and Cha Cha. Emphasis is placed on correct rhythm, poise, footwork, dance position, leading and following, technique and etiquette.


DANC 1180 American Social Dance II (Formerly DANC 1710)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is intended for students with Bronze level American Social Dance experience or equivalent. Students will learn intermediate (Silver) level patterns of American Social Dance including Foxtrot, Waltz, Triple Swing, Viennese Waltz, West Coast Swing, and Cha Cha. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Social Dance I (DANC 1170) or Instructor Permission


DANC 1200 Modern Dance I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: This course will introduce students to the fundamental principles of both classical and contemporary modern dance technique aesthetic. Movement is presented by means of demonstration, description and exploration. Emphasis will be on alignment, coordination, strength, release, proprioception and muscular control.This course is repeatable for credit.


DANC 1205 Gentle Yoga
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course cocuses on the restorative aspects of Vinyasa and Hatha Yoga by introducing students to postures that include light twists, seated forward folds and gentle backbends supported by props thus bringing balance to both body and mind. This course is repetable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DANC 1210 Yoga I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course focuses on Vinyasa and Hatha Yoga. It consists of flowing, progressive postures that focus on the coordination of breath and movement thus bringing balance to both body and mind. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DANC 1215 Yogastrength
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course focuses on the strength aspect of Vinyasa Yoga practice through the incorporation of weight and toning equipment in the flowing sequence of yoga postures. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DANC 1220 Yoga II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2)

Description: This course continues the focus on Vinyasa and Hatha Yoga. It introduces flowing, progressive postures that require more balance and concentration than the postures covered in Yoga I. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Yoga I or Instructor Permission
Corequisites: None


DANC 1230 Modern Dance II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: This course builds on the technique, theory and vocabulary acquired in Modern Dance; I. It introduces students to the intermediate-level principles of both classical and contemporary dance technique styles.; Movement is presented by means of demonstration, description and exploration. Emphasis is on alignment, coordination, strength, release, proprioception, muscular control, and artistry.This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: DANC 1200 or Permission of Instructor


DANC 1330 The Creative Process
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course is a multi-disciplinary approach to the creative process. It explores the development of individual artistry and personal preference. By examining creativity in other disciplines (art, music, architecture, literature) it promotes the development of individual voice and point of view in dance. This course is a prerequisite for Choreography I.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DANC 1410 Tai Chi I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This course introduces students to the basic movements of Tai Chi in order to better understand how the integration of body, mind, and spirit benefits the practitioner. Tai Chi is a valuable cross training exercise for students of all abilities, as it facilitates deep stretches, relaxed strength, whole body coordination, balance, centered alignment, weight shifting, and moving with fluid grace. It improves the coordination and integration of left and right and upper and lower halves of the body; and the extremities of the body, with the inside core. On a more subtle level, Tai Chi unifies body and mind. Movements are paired with conscious breathing. Multiple cognitive and emotional components ? including focused attention, visualization, and intention lead to greater self-awareness and a sense of peace. Repeatable for credit. This class is cross-listed as PE 1410.


DANC 1500 Jazz Dance I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: This course introduces students to the theory and practice of a beginning jazz dance technique. It emphasizes discipline, posture, alignment, balance and muscular control neccessary for the execution of basic jazz steps. Movement is presented by means of demonstration, description and exploration. This course is repeatable for credit.


DANC 1510 Jazz Dance II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: This is an intermediate course for students who have progressed from Jazz Dance 1 (DANC 1500). It introduces students to the theory and practice of an intermediate dance technique. The course emphasizes discipline, posture, alignment, balance and muscular control neccessary for the execution of intermediate Jazz Technique steps. Movement is presented by means of demonstration, description and exploration. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: DANC 1500 or equivalent


DANC 1520 Folk Dance I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course introduces students to the music, styles, and dance steps of International Folk Dance specifically dances from Western Europe, the Middle East, South Africa and the Eastern European Countries. This course is repeatable for credit.


DANC 1540 Clogging I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: Clogging is a type of folk dance that uses percussive footwork through the striking of either a heal or a toe in order to create audible rhythms. In this course students will learn beginning level traditional and contemporary clogging techniques that will include the use of arm movement, footwork, correct body alignment and locomotion in space.


DANC 1580 Tap Dance I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This course will introduce the basic steps, vocabulary and rhythms of Tap Dance. It will also address the history of this American theatrical dance form. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DANC 1585 Tap Dance II (Formally DANC 1680 Tap Dance II)
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Tap Dance II is a course for students who either took Tap Dance I or who have previous Tap Dance experience. Students will learn the intermediate level steps, vocabulary and rhythms of Tap. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Tap Dance I or permission of instructor
Corequisites: None


DANC 1680 Hip-Hop I (Formally DANC 1590)
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This course will explore a variety of Hip-Hop styles and steps. Students will be introduced to fundamental Hip Hop dance technique. Hip-Hop as a cultural movement will be discussed. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DANC 1690 Hip-Hop II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This course introduces students to intermediate-level Hip-Hop technique. Hip-Hop as a cultural movement will be discussed. Old school, new school, lyrical and upbeat, this class will take you through a broad range of Hip-Hop styles.
Prerequisites: Hip-Hop I or Instructor Permission


DANC 1720 Ballroom Technique I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: Stage exhibition, competitive, social, and career aspects of dance are introduced in this technique course. Students will improve posture and overall aesthetics, including lines, body shapes and contra-body movement position. Muscle tone, isolation, stretching and strengthening are core concepts at this stage of dance. Repeatable for credit.


DANC 1740 Latin Ballroom Dance I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Latin Ballroom Dance I is a course for students with no Latin Ballroom Dance experience. Students will learn the beginning (Bronze) level patterns of International Style Rumba, Samba, and Cha Cha. Repeatable for credit.


DANC 1750 Latin Ballroom Dance II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is designed for students with Bronze level American Social Dance experience or equivalent. Students will learn intermediate (Silver) level patterns of American Social Dance including Foxtrot, Waltz, Triple Swing, Viennese Waltz, West Coast Swing, and Cha Cha. Repetable for credit.
Prerequisites: Latin Social Dance I or permission of instructor
Corequisites: None


DANC 1760 Ballroom Technique II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This class is designed for students who have already taken Ballroom Technique I class or who have previous experience in Ballroom Technique. It will continue to develop stage exhibitions, posture and alignment necessary for the proper exhibition of Intermediate Ballroom Technique. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: DANC 1720 or DANC 1740 or DANC 2756 or instructor permission.


DANC 1901 Performing Arts Career Exploratory
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students the opportunity to explore careers in dance. The course is project-based; students will propose and complete projects designed to show their research into areas of occupational interest to them, and present these research projects to class members. This course transfers as dance elective credit to 4-year schools.


DANC 1906 Snow Dance Ensemble I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: This course provides a rigorous introduction to the process and practice of dance rehearsal and performance in a professional dance company setting. Curriculum includes lecture/demonstrations and performances for the college, community, local schools and other performances as requested. Audition or permission of instructor is required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Audition or permission of instructor are required.
Corequisites: Ballet I or II or III and Modern Dance I or II or III


DANC 1916 Snow Dance Ensemble II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: This course builds on the experience and knowledge gained in Snow Dance Ensemble I and provides students with a rigorous reintroduction to the process and practice of dance rehearsal and performance in a professional dance company setting. Curriculum includes lecture/demonstrations and performances for the college, community, local schools and other performances as requested. Audition or permission of instructor is required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Audition or permission of instructor is required.
Corequisites: Ballet I or II or III and Modern Dance I or II or III


DANC 2100 Ballet III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: This course builds on the technique, theory and vocabulary acquired in Ballet I and II. It introduces students to the theory and practice of an advanced classical ballet technique. It emphasizes discipline, posture, alignment, balance and muscular control neccessary for the execution of basic ballet barre and center exercises. Movement is presented by means of demonstration, description and exploration. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: DANC 1130 or Permission of Instructor


DANC 2110 Pointe I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: The course emphasizes ballet pointe technique by building strength and control necessary for development of virtuosity. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: DANC 1100 or DANC 1130
Corequisites: DANC 1130 or Instructor Permission


DANC 2200 Modern Dance III
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: This course builds on the technique, theory and vocabulary acquired in Modern I and Modern II. It introduces students to the advanced-level principles of both classical and contemporary dance technique styles.; Movement is presented by means of demonstration, description and exploration. Emphasis is on proper alignment, coordination, strength, release, proprioception, muscular control, and artistry. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: DANC 1230 or permission of instructor


DANC 2230 Modern Dance IV
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This course builds on the technique, theory and vocabulary acquired in Modern I, Modern II and Modern III classes. It introduces students to the advanced-level principles of both classical and contemporary dance technique styles. Movement is presented by means of demonstration, description and exploration. Emphasis is on proper alignment, coordination, strength, release, proprioception, muscular control, and artistry.
Prerequisites: DANC 2200 or permission of instructor


DANC 2330 Dance Improvisation (formerly DANC 2080)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:3:0)

Description: This course combines the exploration of movement within structured dance frameworks. Improvisation will be studied not only as a means to exploring movement for choreographic purposes, but as a way of developing dance improvisation as an art form. The course will introduce basic principles of composition necessary for successful improvisation, which will then be applied to the dance structures introduced in this course. Classwork will be supplemented with readings from texts about improvisation and creativity.


DANC 2340 Choreography I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course introduces students to principles and practices of creating dance choreography as a form of human expression. Students will generate new choreographic material using improvisation; manipulation of movement; creation and performance of short movement studies; study of other choreographic voices as well as observation, critical analysis, and self-reflection in both spoken and written form.
Prerequisites: DANC 1330 or Instructor Permission
Corequisites: None


DANC 2350 Teaching Methods - Children
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: The course will explore the theoretical basis for children's dance and provide the opportunity in class and off campus for the student to create, test, and experience creative movement lessons for pre-kindergarden through 6th grade children. This class is designed for dance majors and related curricula but open to all students interested in working with children.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DANC 2656 Drill Team
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: The Badgerettes are a precision dance team and an important aspect of halftimeperformances at football and basketball games. This course will provide a rigorous experience in the process and practice of dance rehearsal and performance in a pre-professional dance company setting. The dancers will perform jazz, hip hop, novelty, character, high kick, and military styles. The group also supports Snow College activities and performs on campus and in the community multiple times each semester. Audition required.
Prerequisites: Audition
Corequisites: Students must be concurrently enrolled in at least one of the following courses: DANC 1100, 1130, 1200, 1230 or 2100


DANC 2700 Dance Production
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This survey course introduces essential aspects of dance production. Specific focus will be given to costumes, lighting, sets and props, sound, backstage organization, make-up, promotion, programming, personnel organization as well as the financial aspects of dance concert production.
Prerequisites: None


DANC 2720 Ballroom Technique III
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This class is designed for students with a previous experience in Ballroom Dance technique. Students in this course will improve their ballroom dance technique in the following ways: posture and overall aesthetics, including lines, body shapes and contra-body movement position. Footwork is a crucial element also with Standard and Latin foot placements, turnout, toe to heel timing and overall foot strengthening. Muscle tone, isolation, stretching and strengthening are core concepts at this stage of dance. Stage exhibition, competitive, social and career aspects of dance are introduced. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: DANC 1750 or instructor approval.


DANC 2756 Snow Ballroom Company I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: This course introduces students to the process and practice of dance rehearsal and performance of ballroom dance. It includes lecture/demonstrations and performances for the college, community, local schools and other venues as requested. Students are selected by audition/invitation.
Prerequisites: By Audition Only
Corequisites: DANC 1720


DANC 2757 Snow Ballroom Company II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: This course is designed for students with prior ballroom experience as well as students who have taken Snow Ballroom Company I course. It provides them with opportunities to perform ballroom choreography for the college, community and local schools at a higher level of technique and sophistication.
Prerequisites: DANC 2756
Corequisites: DANC 1720


DANC 2758 Snow Ballroom Company III
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: This course is designed for students with prior ballroom ecperience as well as students who have taken Snow Ballroom Company I and/or Snow Ballroom Company II course. It provides them with opportunities to perform ballroom choreography for the college, community, and local schools at a higher level of technique and sphistication.
Prerequisites: DANC 2757 or Instructor Permission
Corequisites: DANC 2710


DANC 2759 Snow Ballroom Company IV
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: This course is designed for students with prior ballroom experience as well as students who have taken Snow Ballroom Company I, Snow Ballroom Company II, and/or Snow Ballroom Company III course. It provides them with opportunities to perform ballroom choreography for the college, community, and local schools at a higher level of technique and sophistication.
Prerequisites: DANC 2758
Corequisites: DANC 2750


DANC 2760 Ballroom Technique IV
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This class is designed for students with a previous experience in Ballroom Dance technique. Students in this course will improve their ballroom dance technique in the following ways: posture and overall aesthetics, including lines, body shapes and contra-body movement position. Footwork is a crucial element also with Standard and Latin foot placements, turnout, toe to heel timing and overall foot strengthening. Muscle tone, isolation, stretching and strengthening are core concepts at this stage of dance. Stage exhibition, competitive, social and career aspects of dance are introduced. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: DANC 2720 or Instructor approval
Corequisites: if no prerequisite then current enrollment in DANC 2756


DANC 2850 Special Topics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course is designed to address a special topic associated with the discipline that may not be included as a part of the normal curriculum. Topics may be extensions of current field of study or may include possible future additions to the departmental curriculum.


DANC 2901 Dance Capstone
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: This course provides students the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the concepts and skills necessary for continuation in their field of study in the arts. The course is project-based. Students will propose and complete projects designed to show their abilities as performers, creators or scholars of dance and present them in a public forum, either live or online. Examples of these projects include solo or group performances, audio or video recording of works, or the preparation of an online portfolio. In addition to completing the project, students will learn and/or apply the skills necessary to present the project, including the necessary computer, print, design, and marketing skills necessary to present their materials to the public.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


DANC 2906 Snow Dance Ensemble III
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: This course builds on the experience and knowledge gained in Snow Dance Ensemble II course and provides a rigorous reintroduction to the process and practice of dance rehearsal and performance in a professional dance company setting. Curriculum includes lecture/demonstrations and performances for the college, community, local schools and other performances as requested. Audition or permission of instructor is required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. Audition required.
Corequisites: Ballet I or II or III and Modern Dance I or II or III


DANC 2916 Snow Dance Ensemble IV
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: This course builds on the experience and knowledge gained in Snow Dance Ensemble III course and provides a rigorous reintroduction to the process and practice of dance rehearsal and performance in a professional dance company setting. Curriculum includes lecture/demonstrations and performances for the college, community, local schools and other performances as requested. Audition or permission of instructor is required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Audition or permission of instructor are required.
Corequisites: Ballet I or II or III and Modern Dance I or II or III


DMT 1000 Diesel Safety and Basics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This course provides proper knowledge of practices in safety to help establish working habits that would reflect industry standards and result in a safe working environment.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


DMT 1001 Intro to Diesel Technology I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:4:2)

Description: This course covers careers in the Diesel and Transportation Industry, ASE Certification, fasteners, tools, preventative maintenance, lubrication systems, engines, and fuel systems.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DMT 1002 Intro to Diesel Technology II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:4:2)

Description: This course covers electricity and electrical systems, batteries, starting systems, charging systems, steering and suspension systems, brakes, wheels, and tires.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DMT 1007 Principles of Technology I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This applied physics course covers scientific concepts of force, work, rate, resistance, energy, power, transformers, and mathematic computations necessary to perform experiments involving momentum as applied to mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems found in modern industry. Laboratory activities featuring measurement and instrumentation are emphasized.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


DMT 1008 Principles of Technology II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This applied physics course covers mathematic computations necessary to perform experiments involving scientific concepts of vibrations, energy, conversion, transducers, radiation, light, and time constants as applied to mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems found in modern industry. Laboratory activities featuring measurement and instrumentation are emphasized.
Prerequisites: AUTO 1007
Corequisites: N/A


DMT 1101 Diesel Engine Repair
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course will instruct students on the basic operation, parts, and overhaul procedures of diesel engines. The course provides theory on four-stroke diesel engines, their design, structure, operation, maintenance, repair, and overhaul. Students will receive detailed instruction on engine lubrication, air, cooling, and exhaust systems.
Corequisites: DMT 1105


DMT 1105 Diesel Engine Repair Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:9)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience for DMT 1101. This course will instruct students on the basic operation, parts, and overhaul procedures of diesel engines. The course provides theory on four-stroke diesel engines, their design, structure, operation, maintenance, repair, and overhaul. Students will receive detailed instruction on engine lubrication, air, cooling, and exhaust systems.
Corequisites: DMT 1101


DMT 1109 Introduction to Diesel Technology
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This course is designed as a survey of diesel technology for beginning students and as a refresher course for more experienced students. Safety, engines, fuel systems, engine testing, and the overall care and maintenance of diesel powered equipment are discussed and demonstrated. Student projects will be an essential part of this course. All projects must be approved by instructor before being brought into the shop to ensure a match between student expertise and required procedures. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


DMT 1301 Transmissions and Drivetrains
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course provides instruction on theory and operation of torque converters, powershift, automatic transmissions, manual transmissions, double and triple countershaft transmissions, differentials, clutches, transfer cases, axles, drivetrain components, drivelines, and electronic control devices. This course emphasizes troubleshooting, repair procedures, use of service manuals, and schematic diagrams. Corequisite: This lecture DMT 1301 must be taken concurrently with the lab DMT 1305.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: DMT 1305


DMT 1305 Transmissions and Drivetrains Lab
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:9)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience for DMT 1301. This course provides instruction on theory and operation of torque converters, powershift, automatic transmissions, manual transmissions, double and triple countershaft transmissions, differentials, clutches, transfer cases, axles, drivetrain components, drivelines, and electronic control devices. This course emphasizes troubleshooting, repair procedures, use of service manuals, and schematic diagrams. Corequisite: This lab DMT 1305 must be taken concurrently with the lecture DMT 1301.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: DMT 1301


DMT 1401 Diesel Suspension and Steering
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course will instruct students on the theory, basic operation, parts, and adjustment of suspension and steering systems. The course provides study of steering gears, rack and pinion, conventional shocks, alignment angles, and alignment with a computerized four wheel alignment fixture. Corequisite: This lecture DMT 1401 must be taken concurrently with the lab DMT 1405.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: DMT 1405


DMT 1405 Diesel Suspension and Steering Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience for DMT 1401. This course covers the repair and adjustment of suspension and steering systems. Students study steering gears, rack and pinion, king pins, conventional shocks, alignment angles, and alignment with a computerized four wheel alignment fixture. This lab DMT 1405 must be taken concurrently with the lecture DMT 1401.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: DMT 1401


DMT 1501 Diesel Brakes
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course will instruct students on the basic operation, repair, and adjustment of the diesel truck and trailer brake systems and includes hydraulic theory, air brake theory, diagnosis, and service of brake systems. The course provides theory on drums, disks, power units, and Antilock Braking System (ABS) brakes. Corequisite: This lecture DMT 1501 must be taken concurrently with the lab DMT 1505.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: DMT 1505


DMT 1505 Diesel Brakes Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience for DMT 1501. This course covers principles, repair, and adjustment of the diesel truck and trailer brake systems and includes hydraulic theory, air brake theory, diagnosis, and service of brake systems. Students study drums, disks, power units, and Antilock Braking System (ABS) brakes. The lab DMT 1505 must be taken concurrently with the lecture DMT 1501.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: DMT 1501


DMT 1600 Diesel Electrical and Electronics I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:3)

Description: This course covers the principles and laws that govern electrical circuits, including Ohm's and Kirchhoff's Laws. Student will also gain understanding of the use of meters, wiring diagrams, wiring repair, conductors, semiconductors, PN junctions, diodes, transistors, multiplexing, computers, and sensors.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


DMT 1801 Computerized Engine Controls/Fuel Systems
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course provides experience on computerized engine diagnostics. Time will be spent on engine performance factors, scan tools, input sensors, computer outputs, etc. It will also cover maintenance, tune up, repair and diagnostic procedures on electronic, hydraulic electric unit injection (HUEI), Bosch in-line, common rail and mechanical fuel systems.
Corequisites: DMT 1805


DMT 1805 Computerized Engine Controls/Fuel Systems Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course provides experience on computerized engine diagnostics. Time will be spent on engine performance factors, scan tools, input sensors, computer outputs, etc. It will also cover maintenance, tune up, repair and diagnostic procedures on electronic, hydraulic electric unit injection (HUEI), Bosch in-line, common rail and mechanical fuel systems.
Corequisites: DMT 1801


DMT 1999 Cooperative Education Experience
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in the classroom to actual job experience. Classroom instruction must precede the job experience or the student must be registered for courses at the same time the student is enrolled in the work experience.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Corequisites: N/A


DMT 2311 Hydraulics and Pneumatics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course covers theory, formulas, design, maintenance, and repair of hydraulic and pneumatic operated systems, including rams, pistons, apply devices, motors, etc.
Corequisites: DMT 2315


DMT 2315 Hydraulics and Pneumatics lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course covers theory, formulas, design, maintenance, and repair of hydraulic and pneumatic operated systems, including rams, pistons, apply devices, motors, etc.
Corequisites: DMT 2311


DMT 2601 Diesel Electrical and Electronics II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This course covers the theory, operation, and diagnosis of diesel batteries, starting systems, charging systems, lighting systems, instrumentation, and diesel accessories. Corequisite: The lecture DMT 2601 must be taken concurrently with the lab DMT 2605.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: DMT 2605


DMT 2605 Diesel Electrical and Electronics II Lab
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:4)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience required for DMT 2601. It covers theory, operation, and diagnosis of diesel batteries, starting systems, charging systems, lighting systems, instrumentation, and diesel accessories. Corequisite: The lab DMT 2605 must be taken concurrently with the lecture DMT 2601.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: DMT 2601


DMT 2701 Diesel Heating and Air Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: Students will cover the principles, operation, and servicing of automotive, diesel, and transportation; air conditioning and heating systems and their components. Corequisite: The lecture DMT 2701 must be taken concurrently with the lab DMT 2705.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: DMT 2705


DMT 2705 Diesel Heating and Air Conditioning Lab
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:5)

Description: This course gives students the hands-on lab experience required for DMT 2701. Students will cover the principles, operation, and servicing of automotive air conditioning and heating systems and their components. Corequisite: The lab DMT 2705 must be taken concurrently with the lecture DMT 2701.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: DMT 2701


DMT 2800 Special Projects
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:0:3-6)

Description: This course involves a special project where there is a demonstrated need which cannot be met through enrollment in a regularly scheduled course. It also could include special projects of unusual merit in furthering a student's professional and academic goals. Students must be able to sustain and complete independent learning projects. The course provides a framework for developing and enhancing student abilities. The Special Projects Contract must be completed, and will indicate the department through which credit will be awarded. Special projects for one credit can be approved by the advisor, the division dean, and the division representative to the Curriculum Committee. Projects for more than one credit must be approved by the advisor, division dean, and Curriculum Committee. Credit for a special project normally should be one to two credit hours depending on the work completed, but may be more with approval of the dean and Curriculum Committee. Unless approved in the contract, special project credit may not be used to satisfy general education requirements. Repeatable for credit. (This course is equivalent to GNST 2800.)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


DMT 2801 Emissions/Control devices
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course teaches Diesel systems that control/regulate the engines output emissions, emission controls, maintenance procedures, repair, diagnosis, and safety. Students will be taught the emission standards and regulations of the federal government and administered by organizations such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).
Corequisites: DMT 2805


DMT 2805 Emissions and Emissions Control Devices Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course teaches Diesel systems that control/regulate the engines output emissions, emission controls, maintenance procedures, repair, diagnosis, and safety. Students will be taught the emission standards and regulations of the federal government and administered by organizations such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).
Corequisites: DMT 2801


DRFT 1010 Technical Drafting
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:3:4)

Description: This course is an introduction of fundamental drafting techniques, tools, equipment, and standard drawings using American National Standard Institute (ANSI) standards that are required in today's industry. Students shall explore many different job opportunities and the requirements of industry in obtaining these jobs.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DRFT 1100 Architecture-Residential Design
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: The emphasis of this course is comprehensive coverage of design fundamentals and procedures used to represent design ideas using traditional, as well as state of the art technology. It covers the solving of problems related to the design of a residential structure and considers the influence of building cost, modular applications, building codes, and zoning regulations with respect to the site and design.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DRFT 1302 Basic CAD
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course teaches drafting using Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) software system. It includes enough exposure to the Windows operating system to create and manage files, create and read directories, and integrate CAD software as it applies to drawing files. It also includes using CAD commands to create drawings with various lines and shapes, using drawing display options, placing text on drawings, printing and plotting drawing files, using the editing commands, and using basic dimensioning.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


DRFT 2332 Mechanical CAD Drafting
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:3:3)

Description: The course will introduce the student to the 3D modeling process and 3D parametric modeling. It will present a process-based approach to mechanical drafting using solid modeling commands, options, and techniques. Students will experience the power of solid modeling with a parametric modeling program, as they complete parts, assemblies and working drawings.
Corequisites: None


DRON 1180 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Training
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to prepare students for certification of Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operator training and includes the essential topics of safety/liability considerations, operational risk management, GPS and navigational topics, preflight operations, manual and automatic flight, and emergency procedures and equipment malfunctions. Each of these topics include first-hand investigation via extensive equipment use, research, and inquiry.


DRON 2845 Drone Operations and Safety Certification
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5:1)

Description: Safety training in natural resources helps students obtain the necessary skills and certifications to allow them to be employable in the field and perform required duties safely. This course will cover material necessary to pass the FAA Part 107 test to receive a small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) commercial pilot license. It will also overview drone operations and applications. This course is cross-listed as GEO 2845
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


E


ECON 1010 Economics As A Social Science
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course is designed to provide students an introduction into economics. This course teaches students economic principles and theories that undergird our economic system and how these principles and theories influence economic realities markets and society. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Social and Behavioral Science General Education requirement at Snow College.


ECON 1740 US Economic History
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: American Institutions (AI)
Description: This course is designed to provide an introduction into the economic growth and development of the United States from the colonial period to the present. This course analyzes how the evolution of the American economy and institutions, as well as important historical events, have affected and influenced the economic system of the United States of America. Successful completion of this course satisfies the American Institutions (AI) requirement established by the Utah State Legislature and USHE.


ECON 2010 Principles of Microeconomics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course is designed to provide students an introduction to the principles of microeconomics. This course teaches students microeconomic principles and theories that are the basis for economic behavior and economic systems with the primary focus on the U.S. market system. Students examine how these principles and theories influence economic reality in markets and society. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Social and Behavioral Science General Education requirement at Snow College.


ECON 2020 Principles of Macroeconomics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide students an introduction to the principles of macroeconomics. This course teaches students economic principles and theories that undergird our national economic system and how these principles and theories influence economic realities markets and society.
Prerequisites: ECON 2010


EDUC 1004 Investigations in Diversity
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: The course is designed to be offered to Upward Bound students, giving them an introduction to diversity-related topics such as: race, gender, religion, disability, and age. It includes weekly reading assignments, meetings, group discussions, and possible excursions to pertinent sites. Students will be expected to show self-motivation and participate as part of a group-learning dynamic. Funds for excursions, supplies, and texts will be provided by Upward Bound. The course may be repeated once.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


EDUC 1010 Introduction to Education
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: The primary focus of this course is upon the attributes of an effective, professional teacher. Opportunities for assessment of personal qualifications are provided through self-analysis, discussion and through experience as an observer/aide for a minimum of 24 hours in public school classrooms (see EDUC 1015). This course also includes a variety of the history of American education, and the roles of various professionals engaged in education.


EDUC 1015 Introduction to Education Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:1)

Description: This course is the lab that accompanies EDUC 1010. In this lab students gain practical experience as an observer/aide for a minimum of 30 hours in public school classrooms.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: EDUC 1010


EDUC 2400 Diverse Populations
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course examines social and cultural characteristics of various minority groups and emphasizes the use of a variety of resources for solving minority group problems. It is designed to provide content related to the experiences, needs, and responses of ethnic minorities in the United States in order to build community resources to solve potential problems of ethnic minorities. Attention will be given to identifying, exploring, and demonstrating the knowledge,values, and skills essential for multicultural competence in both social work and public educational practices.


EDUC 2850 Special Topics
Semester(s) Taught: Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is designed to address a special topic associated with the discipline that may not be included as a part of the normal curriculum.; Topics may be extensions of current field of study or it may include possible future additions to the departmental curriculum.


EDUC 2851 Global Perspectives in Education Focus on Latin America
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2-3:2-2:0-1)

Description: This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary and secondary teachers with an overview of the historical, philosophical, and cultural forces that affect education in Latin America, specifically Mexico. Participants will delve into the historical past of Mexico, which included Guatemala, to look at the events, and oppressions suffered by these people which shaped their culture and outlook on life. This will include their view of US citizens and their treatment by the education system here. Students will come to understand the nature of learning and the diversity of learning opportunities for students in Latin America. The families role in the education process, the role religion may or may not play in education, what, if any, extra educational opportunities are available to students and are they generally used, how the education of students with special needs is handled, and what role Latin American culture plays in education. These should give an overall idea of what the education system in Latin America is like, what drives it, and how it compares to that in the USA.
Prerequisites: EDUC 1010


ENGL 0980 Writing Basics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Recommended for students scoring lower than 17 on the English section of the ACT (and required for those scoring below 11), this course provides a first experience with academic writing and/or a review of the basic components of writing, including grammar, usage, and punctuation. Students learn simple sentence construction and coordination leading to basic paragraph construction. Students learn to respond to written texts and prompts. The course prepares students to succeed in English 1010.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


ENGL 0991 Beginning Writing
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:5:0)

Description: This course is for students who qualify for Student Support Services only and is recommended for students scoring lower than 17 on the English section of the ACT or below 810 on the SAT. The course emphasizes sentence and paragraph construction and reviews grammar, usage, and punctuation. Students respond to written texts and prompts in preparation for ENGL 1010.
Prerequisites: Qualification through Student Support Services


ENGL 1010 Expository Composition
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: English I (E1)
Description: This course emphasizes critical reading, writing, and thinking skills through writing-intensive workshops. It explores writing situations as a complex process focusing specifically on idea generation relative to audience and purpose, working through multiple drafts, peer collaboration, and revision, and it includes rhetorical analysis. See prerequisites.
Prerequisites: Students who have an ACT English score of 11-17 or an SAT verbal score of 368-483 are encouraged to take English 0980 or 0991 before taking English 1010. Students who have an ACT English score of 10 or below, or an SAT verbal score lower than 368, are required to take ENGL 0980 or ENGL 0991 prior to enrolling in ENGL 1010. Non-native speakers of English must complete ESL 1051 Level 3 Composition, score a 4 or higher on the Test of Written English (TWE), or take a written exam (graded by ESL department faculty members) before they can register for ENGL 1010 (see the Snow College catalog for more detailed information).
Corequisites: none


ENGL 1010 Expository Composition*
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: English I (E1)
Description: This course emphasizes critical reading, writing, and thinking skills through writing-intensive workshops. It explores writing situations as a complex process focusing specifically on idea generation relative to audience and purpose, working through multiple drafts, peer collaboration, and revision, and it includes rhetorical analysis. See prerequisites.*Open to Student Support Services participants only.
Prerequisites: *Students must qualify through Student Support Services to enroll in this version of English 1010 that meets five days per week. Students who have an ACT English score of 10 or below, or an SAT verbal score lower than 368, are required to take ENGL 0980 or ENGL 0991 prior to enrolling in ENGL 1010. Non-native speakers of English must complete ESL 1051 Level 3 Composition, score a 4 or higher on the Test of Written English (TWE), or take a written exam (graded by ESL department faculty members) before they can register for ENGL 1010 (see the Snow College catalog for more detailed information).
Corequisites: none


ENGL 1015 Expository Composition (Extended)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:4:0)

General Ed Requirement: English I (E1)
Description: This course emphasizes critical reading, writing, and thinking skills through writing-intensive workshops. It explores writing situations as a complex process focusing specifically on idea generation relative to audience and purpose, working through multiple drafts, peer collaboration, and revision, and it includes rhetorical analysis. English 1015 differs from English 1010 by adding extra support for students during a fourth class session per week. English 1015 is recommended for students with ACT scores in English of 12-14.


ENGL 1410 English Mechanics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course provides analysis and review of standard English grammar, punctuation, spelling, and sentence structure. It also explores techniques to achieve desirable tone and style as they relate to academic writing and business correspondence.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


ENGL 2010 Intermediate Research Writing
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: English II (E2)
Description: Students will build on the skills learned in ENGL 1010 in this intermediate writing course designed to improve students' reading, writing, research, and critical thinking skills. The course may include expository, persuasive, and/or argumentative writing emphases. The course will require several research oriented writing assignments. Students must achieve a C- or higher in this course to receive GE credit.
Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL 1010 or equivalent with a grade of C- or better


ENGL 2014 Intermediate Composition: Honors Thesis
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: English II (E2)
Description: This course is designed to improve the composition skills of honors students through an honors thesis project. Students will study effective discourse, argumentation, and research methods. They will select a subject for their thesis project and work with an advisor in the field of study. This class replaces; English 2010 as part of the; English GE requirement, and students must achieve a C- or higher to receive GE credit. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: ENGL 1010 with a minimum grade of C-
Corequisites: Affiliation with Snow College Honors Program


ENGL 2130 Science Fiction Literature
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is designed to give students an appreciation of science fiction, a literary genre that is often overlooked by the literary establishment. The course examines the contemporary history of the genre using several representative texts.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


ENGL 2150 Honors Intellectual Traditions of the West I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is an integrative exploration of the intellectual traditions of the ancient and medieval Western world. The emphasis of the course is on reading seminal literary works, but introduces other interdisciplinary approaches such as art, architecture, philosophy, religion, and mathematics. It fulfills an HU general education requirement. This class is open to all students and fills an honors program requirement.


ENGL 2160 Honors Intellectual Traditions of the West II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is an integrative exploration of Europe and America during the sixteenth through twenty-first centuries. The emphasis of the course is on reading entire seminal works in the history of western culture, and other interdisciplinary approaches might include art, music, philosophy, religion, and science. It fulfills an HU general education requirement. This class is open to all students and is a required core class in the Honors Program.


ENGL 2200 Introduction to Literature
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is an introduction to literary forms, to close reading of literature, and to the terminology of literature. The emphasis is on fiction, poetry, and drama. The course will emphasize literary traditions, historical time periods, diverse authors, careful reading, literary analysis, and thoughtful interpretation.
Prerequisites: None


ENGL 2210 Folklore and Literature
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course surveys literary texts that draw on oral traditions in their plots, characters, or language. The emphasis is on canonical and multicultural American literature, and the course also asks students to examine artistic aspects of oral storytelling.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


ENGL 2220 Introduction to Fiction
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is an introduction to fiction, primarily short stories and novels. The course will emphasize literary traditions, historical time periods, diverse authors, careful reading, literary analysis, and thoughtful interpretation.


ENGL 2230 Classic Myths and Folktales
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course explores myths and folktales of the world with an emphasis on Greco-Roman myths and tales. The course focuses on application of the myths to art, literature, and Western culture in general.


ENGL 2240 Introduction to Poetry
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course provides a critical approach to poetry's forms and developments, including historical trends and modern movements. Emphasis is on recognizing, understanding, and responding to poetry in all its forms.


ENGL 2250 Introduction to Creative Writing
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: Introduction to Creative Writing focuses on at least three different genres (i.e. fiction, poetry, graphic novels, or others) and guides students through the creative process, creative writing theory, and genre-specific writing techniques. Additionally, students will participate in workshopping their own writing projects. Because reading literature is so closely tied to writing literature, the class also includes analysis of literature, allowing students to read like a writer. ENGL 2250 is recommended as a preparatory class for genre-specific creative writing classes at Snow College.


ENGL 2260 Fiction Writing
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to the writing of fiction. Students read and discuss exemplary models and compose a variety of projects of their own. Emphasis is placed on plot, character, dialogue, and description, and other techniques associated with fiction writing. It is recommended that students take ENGL 2250, Introduction to Creative Writing, before taking ENGL 2260. This course was formerly ENGL 2250.


ENGL 2270 Writing Poetry
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to the writing of poetry. Students read and discuss exemplary models and compose a variety of projects of their own. Students study a range of poetic techniques such as imagery, metaphor, form, lines, and other techniques associated with poetry. It is recommended that students take ENGL 2250, Introduction to Creative Writing, before taking ENGL 2270. This course was formerly ENGL 2250.


ENGL 2280 Writing Creative Nonfiction
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to the writing of creative nonfiction. Students read and discuss exemplary models and compose a variety of projects of their own. Students study a range of techniques such narrative structure, argument, characterization and other techniques associated with creative nonfiction. It is recommended that students take ENGL 2250, Introduction to Creative Writing, before taking ENGL 2280.


ENGL 2300 Introduction to Shakespeare
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: Shakespeare remains one of the most popular playwrights in the English Language. Who is he?  Why is he considered so important?  What meaning did his works have in his own time?  Are they applicable to today's culture?  This course will examine these questions by examining a sampling of Shakespeare's plays and poetry from a variety of critical perspectives.


ENGL 2330 Children's Literature
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course provides an introduction to poetry, fiction and non-fiction written for children. Emphasis is on selection, critical analysis, and approaches to teaching.
Prerequisites: English 1010


ENGL 2360 Contemporary World Literature
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is an introduction to world literature of the 20th and 21st centuries, emphasizing literary texts from outside the Anglo-American traditional canon and that circulate worldwide. Special emphasis is placed on non-Western texts. The course will emphasize literary traditions, contemporary ideas and events, diverse authors, careful reading, literary analysis, and thoughtful interpretation.


ENGL 2400 Special Topics in Literature and Culture
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is designed to introduce unique literary topics on a semester to semester basis. Gothic literature, Science Fiction literature, African American literature courses all began as English 2400 classes. The specific subject for any given semester will be shown in the class schedule.


ENGL 2410 Literature of the American West
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is a regional study of literature of the American West. Areas of emphasis include Native Americans, mountain men, settlers, the cowboy myth hero, and the American frontier. Manifest Destiny and the multicultural nature of westward expansion will be emphasized in the course.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


ENGL 2420 Literature of the Outdoors
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is a survey of literature addressing the experiences of people and their relationship with the natural environment. Encountering nature is a fundamental characteristic of human cultures and individuals. With the growing interest and importance of human relationships with the environment, the genres of natural history writing, experiential nature writing, and exploration and adventure writing have continued to flourish. This course is designed to help students become aware of the complexities of our relationship with the outdoors by surveying literature that deals with relevant themes.


ENGL 2430 Gothic and Supernatural Literature
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course explores Gothic and supernatural literature, with an emphasis on horror fiction, from 1764 to the present day. Works that have been studied in recent years include Frankenstein, Carmilla, The Tell-Tale Heart, and short stories by Stephen King. Themes that have been discussed include the sublime, sexual identity, and the nature of evil.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


ENGL 2450 Introduction to Gender Studies
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: Introduction to Gender Studies investigates gender and gender identity, reflecting on how gender is identified and defined; how gender norms are established, maintained, and disrupted; and the role gender plays in both personal and social contexts. Students will be familiarized with gender theory. In addition, students will be introduced to the historical context surrounding gender studies, as well as key terms, movements, and thinkers within the field.


ENGL 2460 African-American Literature
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course focuses on the contributions of African-American writers to the development of a multi-racial culture in America, and to the expression of the black experience through literature.


ENGL 2510 Masterpieces of American Literature I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course focuses on the development of ideas, movements, and genres in American literature from exploration and settlement to Romanticism as illustrated through representative texts.


ENGL 2520 Masterpieces of American Literature II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course focuses on the development of ideas, movements, and genres in American literature from Realism to the present as illustrated through representative texts.


ENGL 2600 Introduction to Critical Literature / Theory
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course offers an introduction to literary genres, literary criticism, critical interpretation, and research.
Prerequisites: English 2010


ENGL 2610 Masterpieces of British Literature I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course surveys significant cultural ideas and currents of British literature from its beginnings through the Eighteenth Century as illustrated through representative texts.


ENGL 2620 Masterpieces of British Literature II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: The course focuses on the development of ideas, movement, and genres in British Literature from the Romantic era to the present as illustrated through representative texts.


ENGL 2650 Language in Society
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: We are all intimately familiar with at least one language: our own. Few native speakers, however, stop to consider what they know about their own language and how their language shapes daily life. This course will provide students with a basic introduction to language and the relationship of language to society. Examples will be taken from a wide variety of languages and cultures. This course is cross-listed with TESL 2650.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


ENGL 2660 Introduction to Language Systems
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: A general introduction to the theory of language, this course will focus on language systems, including how they exist in linguistic communities, with particular attention to phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Examples of general linguistic principles will be drawn from English as well as other languages. Cross-listed as TESL 2660.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


ENGL 3260 Technical Communication
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course focuses on professional, scientific, governmental, and technical discourse, including memos, letters, process descriptions, instructions, reports, and others in both print and digital media. Students will develop skills in audience awareness and rhetorical analysis, clarity and precision of expression, and document/visual design.
Prerequisites: ENGL 2010 or equivalent


ENGR 1000 Introduction to Engineering
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This course explores engineering as a career choice. It is an introduction to the theory and practice of engineering science, including elementary problem solving and engineering design. Additional topics include engineering history, disciplines, functions, education, demographics, and future challenges. Lab experiences will emphasize the use of the computer as an engineering tool to solve problems by writing programs. Students are challenged with a engineering project to develop team engineering skills.
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or Equivalent
Corequisites: MATH 1050, MATH 1060, MATH 1080, or higher or instructor's permission


ENGR 1300 Engineering Graphics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Students will learn visualization techniques and procedures to facilitate the engineering design process. A The course will include technical sketching, orthographic projection, dimensioning, tolerancing, and modeling of objects in both two and three-dimensions. Solid modeling will be enhanced by the use of computer-aided drafting and design software while exploring engineering design and analysis.
Prerequisites: MATH 1060, MATH 1080, MATH 1210, MATH 1220 or High School Trigonemetry or Calculus
Corequisites: N/A


ENGR 1703 Introduction to Chemical Engineering
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of chemical engineering. The course focuses on the development of problem-solving skills through in-class activities, laboratory experiments, and a hands-on design project.
Prerequisites: C or better in ((MATH 1210 OR 1220 ) AND (CHEM 1210 OR AP CHEM score of at least 4)).
Corequisites: Must be currently enrolled in ENGR 1704


ENGR 1704 Introduction to Chemical Engineering Lab
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Introduction to fundamental principles of chemical engineering and development of problem-solving skills through laboratory experiments.
Prerequisites: C or better in ((MATH 1210 OR 1220 ) AND (CHEM 1210 OR AP CHEM score of at least 4)).
Corequisites: Must be currently enrolled in ENGR 1703


ENGR 2010 Statics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:1)

Description: The Statics course explores the physical conditions necessary for an object to remain stationary. Students will learn how to solve problems involving forces, moments, free body diagrams, equivalent systems, distributed loads, shear and moment diagrams, friction, center of gravity, and moment of inertia. Techniques to analyze trusses and frames will be emphasized. ENGR 2010 is the first in a series of classes that engineering students study to learn the mechanics of materials.
Prerequisites: Calculus I (MATH 1210)
Corequisites: N/A


ENGR 2030 Dynamics
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:1)

Description: The Dynamics course explores the physical conditions an object experiences when moving.Students utilize classical Newtonian theory to analyze mass systems in response to applied forces and moments. Topics include motion and kinetic analysis of particles and rigid bodies. ENGR 2030 is part of a series of classes that engineering students study to learn the mechanics of materials.
Prerequisites: Calculus II (MATH 1220), and Physics I (PHYS 2210)
Corequisites: N/A


ENGR 2140 Strength of Materials
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:1)

Description: The Strength of Materials course explores the deformation and possible failure of an object subjected to forces and moments.; Stress and strain due to axial, torsional, bending, and shearing loads are studied.; Additional topics include: stress-strain diagrams, material properties, thermal expansion, stress concentrations, elastoplastic behavior, residual stresses, statically indeterminate structures, power shaft design, transformed sections, shear force and bending moment diagrams, beam design, eccentric loading, non-symmetric bending, Mohr's Circle to find principal stresses, failure criteria, pressure vessels, beam deflection by integrating singularity functions, superposition, and column buckling. ENGR 2140 is part of a series of classes that engineering students study to learn the mechanics of materials.
Prerequisites: Calculus II (MATH 1220), and Statics (ENGR 2010)
Corequisites: N/A


ENGR 2160 Materials Science
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:1)

Description: The Materials Science course explores how the atomic and microstructure of metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites affect material properties, such as diffusion, elasticity, hardness, work hardening, failure modes, phase transformations, crystallinity, corrosion, conductivity, etc. Constraints driving the selection of materials for engineering applications are examined.
Prerequisites: Calculus II (MATH 1220), Principles of Chemistry I (CHEM 1210), and Mechanics of Materials (ENGR 2140). CHEM 1210 and ENGR 2140 may be taken concurrently with instructor approval and other significant chemistry education already completed.
Corequisites: N/A


ENGR 2240 Surveying and Global Positioning
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: Laboratory and lecture class covering the use of a transit, a level, a total station, and other equipment in field surveying. Also covered are field astronomy, calculation procedures, state plane coordinates, public-land division, and an introduction to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: MATH 1060 or high school trigonometry


ENGR 2250 Analog Circuits
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course presents the fundamentals of analog circuits, including an introduction to circuit analysis techniques using Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff's Laws, node voltages, mesh currents, and Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits. Both first order RL and RC circuits and second order RLC circuits are included as well as operational amplifiers. Also treated are phasors and sinusoidal steady-state analysis.
Prerequisites: Calculus II (MATH 1220)
Corequisites: Analog Circuits Lab (ENGR 2255)


ENGR 2255 Analog Circuits Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: This laboratory course is to accompany ENGR 2250. It treats instruction in the use of electronic measuring instruments, including multimeters, function generators, power supplies, and oscilloscopes. Electronic components and instruments will be used to apply and illustrate concepts studied in the lecture course. (Lab fee required)
Corequisites: Analog Circuits (ENGR 2250)


ENGR 2290 Analog Circuits II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course continues the study of analog circuits. It covers second-order RLC circuits, AC steady-state analysis, steady-state power and three-phase circuits, the Laplace Transform, filters, and Bode diagrams.
Prerequisites: ENGR 2250 MATH 2280
Corequisites: MATH 2280 if not already complete ENGR 2295


ENGR 2295 Analog Circuits II Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: This laboratory course is to accompany ENGR 2290. It continues instruction in the use of electronic measuring instruments including multimeters, function generators, power supplies, and oscilloscopes. Electronic components and instruments will be used to apply, analyze, and illustrate circuits studied in the lecture course. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: ENGR 2255
Corequisites: ENGR 2290 - Analog Circuits II


ENGR 2300 Engineering Thermodynamics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to principles of thermodynamics, including reversible and irreversible processes, equations of state, First and Second Laws, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, exergy, the Carnot cycle, and gas power cycles.
Prerequisites: MATH 1220 or equivalent


ENGR 2450 Numerical Methods
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: ENGR 2450 is an introduction to numerical methods of problem solving, including root finding, solutions of linear and nonlinear equations, eigen value problems, curve fitting and regression analysis, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, optimization, and numerical solution of partial-differential equations. Computer implementation of these methods using spreadsheets, various programming languages such as C++, VBA, MATLAB, and MATLAB computational software will be a major emphasis of the course.
Prerequisites: Calculus II (MATH 1220), CS 1400
Corequisites: N/A


ENGR 2700 Digital Circuits
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to digital systems, logic gates, combinational logic circuits, and sequential logic circuits. It includes minimization techniques and implementation with encoders, decoders, multiplexers, and programmable logic devices. It considers Mealy and Moore models of state machines, state minimization, and state assignment. It also introduces a hardware description.
Prerequisites: MATH 1050
Corequisites: ENGR 2705


ENGR 2705 Digital Circuits Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This laboratory is to accompany ENGR 2700. Digital circuits similar to those studied in ENGR 2700 will be assembled and tested and will be described and programmed in programmable logic devices. Computer software will be used to assist in the design, realization, and to simulation of digital systems.
Corequisites: ENGR 2700


ENGR 2850 Special Topics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This course is designed to address a special topic associated with the discipline that may not be included as a part of the normal curriculum. Topics may be extensions of current field of study or may include possible future additions to the departmental curriculum.


ESL 0211 Level 1 Listening
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:4)

Description: This eight-week course is designed to give students a basic foundation in listening comprehension skills. Students will listen for letters, spelling, numbers, directions, and respond in a workbook. Each unit will also include short problem solving listening tasks.
Prerequisites: Placement in ESL 0211 through the department


ESL 0241 Level 1 Content Based Reading
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:3:0)

Description: This eight-week content based reading course is designed to give students the opportunity to develop reading skills in English in several content areas. Students will use a variety of authentic reading materials to learn basic prereading and reading strategies. These strategies are designed to improve their reading comprehension. The reading materials will also be used to expand the students' vocabulary.
Prerequisites: Placement in ESL 0241 through the department


ESL 0251 Level 1 Writing
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:3:0)

Description: This course focuses on the skills of writing in English at the elementary level. The objectives of this course are to help ESL students gain confidence and fluency in writing. Students participate in guided writing activities and creative writing projects.
Prerequisites: Placement in ESL 0251 through the department


ESL 0270 Level 1 Conversation
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:5:0)

Description: This eight-week course is designed to give ESL students at the elementary level practice using English. They will improve their use of the language through small group work, problem solving activities, information gap activities, and roleplaying. The ratio of students to tutor is four-to-one.
Prerequisites: Placement in ESL 0270 through the department


ESL 0280 Level 1 Grammar
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:5:0)

Description: This course is designed to give students a foundation in English grammar and vocabulary. The course will also focus on helping students improve their listening comprehension and speaking skills.
Prerequisites: Placement in ESL 0280 through the department


ESL 0411 Level 2 Listening
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:4)

Description: This course is designed to introduce ESL students to listening skills which are needed for aural comprehension in an academic setting. The course is a directed program which gives students practice in listening to short lectures, taking notes and developing vocabulary. Students are introduced to several English language speech patterns and the words and phrases which let the student know that a particular pattern is being used. When students recognize the context of the information they are hearing, their English listening skills improve.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ESL 0211 or placement in ESL 0411 through the department


ESL 0431 Level 2 American Culture and Values for International Students
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:3:0)

Description: This course will provide international students with an introduction to American culture and values. Students will read and discuss essays dealing with different aspects of American culture, values, and thought. Field trips to local businesses, ranches, museums, and schools also play a significant role in helping students gain firsthand experience.
Prerequisites: Placement in ESL 0431 through the department


ESL 0441 Level 2 Reading
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to develop reading skills and vocabulary at the intermediate level. Students will read selections from the textbook and other assigned readings. They will demonstrate reading comprehension by participation in class activities and discussions and through short answer essay and objective exams.
Prerequisites: Placement in ESL 0441 through the department


ESL 0451 Level 2 Composition
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:3:0)

Description: This course focuses on the development of well-written paragraphs. The objectives of this course are to teach American thought patterns as they relate to writing in English. Students will write paragraphs using a variety of rhetorical patterns.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ESL 0251 or placement through the department


ESL 0470 Level 2 Conversation
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:5:0)

Description: This eight-week course is designed to give ESL students at the intermediate level practice using English. They will improve their use of the language through small group work, problem solving activities, information gap activities, and roleplaying. The ratio of students to tutor is four-to-one.
Prerequisites: Placement in ESL 0470 through the ESL department placement exam or successful completion of ESL 0270 with a B (85%) or better.


ESL 0480 Level 2 Grammar
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1.5:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to give ESL students at the intermediate level a continued foundation of English grammar. English grammar structural problems common to many ESL learners will be dealt with in this course.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ESL 0280 or placement in ESL 480 through the department.


ESL 0970 Level 3 Conversation
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:5:0)

Description: This eight-week course is designed to give ESL students at the high-intermediate level practice using English. They will improve their use of the language through small group work, problem solving activities, information gap activities, and roleplaying. The ratio of students to tutor is four-to-one.
Prerequisites: Placement in ESL 0970 through the ESL department placement exam or successful completion of ESL 0470 with a B (85%) or better.


ESL 0975 Level 4 Conversation
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:5:0)

Description: This eight-week course is designed to give ESL students at the advanced level practice using English. They will improve their use of the language through small group work, problem solving activities, information gap activities, and roleplaying. The ratio of students to tutor is four-to-one.
Prerequisites: Placement in ESL 0975 through the department


ESL 1000 International Student Orientation
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is required for incoming ESL students and will provide them with the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and awareness to adapt to college life ;at Snow College. The course is designed with multiple sections ;which will help ;orient students ;to college life and American culture. These learning sections will address the following issues: adjusting to American college culture, campus services, and ;US immigration law as it pertains to International students studying in the US.
Prerequisites: Students must have a current Foreign Student Visa to attend this course.


ESL 1011 Level 3 Listening
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:4)

Description: This course is designed to give students the listening skills needed in American college and university classes. The course uses content-based lectures via videos, tapes, and live lectures. Students also develop note-taking skills to prepare for fully matriculated coursework.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ESL 0411 or placement in ESL 1011 through the department


ESL 1040 Level 3 Content-Based Reading
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:4:0)

Description: This course is designed to develop reading skills needed to prepare students to participate in academic coursework in colleges and universities. Students will read and discuss a variety of authentic texts and be introduced to specific discourse markers. The course will contribute to vocabulary development. Some emphasis will be placed on reading for entertainment and general information.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ESL 0441 or placement in ESL 1040 through the department


ESL 1051 Level 3 Composition
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:3:0)

Description: This course focuses on the development of well-written essays. Students will develop English writing skills by writing five-paragraph essays in at least four modal styles in preparation for English 1010. Non-native speakers of English must complete this course, score a 4 or higher on the Test of Written English (TWE), or take a written exam (graded by ESL department faculty members) before they can register for ENGL 1010 (see the Snow College catalog for more detailed information).
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ESL 0451 or through the department


ESL 1080 Level 3 Grammar
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course is designed to give ESL students at the advanced level a review of English grammar. English grammar structural problems common to many ESL learners will be dealt with in this course.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ESL 0451 or placement in ESL 1080 through the department


ESL 1130 Level 4 American Culture and History
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:3:0)

Description: This course will provide international students with an introduction to American culture and history through reading and discussing essays. Students will research various topics regarding US government, history and culture, and report their findings to the class.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Level 3 in the ESL Department or placement in ESL 1130 through the department


ESL 1161 Level 4 Introduction to Research
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to give students a basic foundation in gathering information for a research paper. Students will use both the library and the Internet. The course will focus on recording and documenting research information and completing a writing project from the research.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Level 3 in the ESL Department or placement in ESL 1161 through the department


ESL 1170 Level 4 Introduction to Literature
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course is designed to give students a basic foundation in critical and evaluative reading. The course will also serve as a general introduction to literature with a focus on enjoyment, understanding, and analysis. Three genres will be covered--fiction, drama, and poetry.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of ESL 1040 in the ESL Department or placement in ESL 1170 through the department


ESL 1191 Level 4 TOEFL Preparation Course
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1.5:3:2)

Description: This course will provide comprehensive coverage of the language skills and test-taking strategies students need to do well on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) exam. This course also serves as a review of grammar, reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Level 3 in the ESL Department or placement in ESL 1191 through the department
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FREN 1010 Elementary French I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

Description: This course provides an introduction to the French language and the cultures of French-speaking peoples. It is designed for students with no previous French study. During the course, students develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use French in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write French at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation and basic conversation practice in French.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


FREN 1020 Elementary French II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: Foreign Language (FL)
Description: This course is a continuation of FREN 1010 and provides additional exposure to the French language and the cultures of French-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed FREN 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use French in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write French at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in French, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.
Prerequisites: FREN 1010 or equivalent
Corequisites: None


FREN 2010 Intermediate French I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:5:0)

Description: This course reviews and expands upon the communicative aspects of the French language acquired by students in FREN 1010 and FREN 1020, by focusing on three main areas: linguistics, literature and film, and culture. The linguistic focus of the course is on vocabulary development, accuracy of expression, and improved communication. Students review structures and vocabulary learned in elementary courses and use them in longer, more detailed speech and compositions. The literary focus of the course is on the development of reading skills for authentic texts, from both print and other media. The cultural focus of the course is on increasing the knowledge and understanding of the geography, history, and traditions of the francophone world. This course is interactive with an emphasis on learner participation in reading, speaking, listening, and writing in French.
Prerequisites: FREN 1020 or its equivalent


FREN 2020 Intermediate French II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: Foreign Language (FL)
Description: FREN 2020 is part two of the two-course sequence in intermediate French at Snow College. It is for students who have completed FREN 2010 (or its equivalent) or three to four years of high school French. During the course students explore various themes in different French-speaking cultures. They focus on vocabulary development, accuracy of expression, and increased communication strategies. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.
Prerequisites: FREN 2010 or equivalent


FREN 2950 Undergraduate Tutoring
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:0:3-6)

Description: This course is for native or more proficient speakers of French who will help beginning and intermediate students review, strengthen, and apply language skills taught in all French courses at Snow College. This includes both conversation practice and grammar instruction. Tutors may be asked to proofread documents, grade quizzes or homework, provide feedback, and perform other small tasks as directed by the instructor. Tutors receive training and support from the instructor.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval and advanced proficiency in French.
Corequisites: None.


FRM 2010 Farm/Ranch Management I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This course is designed to teach individual farmers/ranchers to organize and computerize their farm/ranch records. Individualized instructional format focuses on record keeping with emphasis on using, operating, and maintaining computerized records. Class will consist of monthly farm/ranch visits with some group instruction. Students will receive either a P (passing) or F (failing) grade at the conclusion of their enrollment year. Students are registered upon instructor approval.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


FRM 2020 Farm/Ranch Management II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This course is a continuation of Farm/Ranch Management I. Instruction emphasizes the organization of farm/ranch financial and production information into enterprises and completion of a fiscal year-end enterprise analysis report. Class will consist of monthly face-to-face farm/ranch visits with some group instruction. Students will receive a P (passing) or F (failing) grade at the conclusion of the semester. Students are registered upon approval from the instructor.
Prerequisites: FRM 2010
Corequisites: N/A


FRM 2030 Farm/Ranch Management III
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This course is a continuation of Farm/Ranch Management II. Instruction emphasizes budgeting, cash flow planning, and total farm/ranch record analysis for management decision making. Class will consist of monthly face-to-face on farm/ranch visits with some group instruction. Students will receive a P (passing) or F (failing) grade at the conclusion of their enrollment year. Students are registered upon approval from the instructor.
Prerequisites: FRM 2020
Corequisites: N/A


FRM 2040 Farm/Ranch Management IV
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (.5:0:1)

Description: This course is designed to teach advanced principles of farm/ranch business management and is designed to meet specialized individual student needs. Five areas of specialization are emphasized. Individual instruction focuses on one or more of the following areas: inventory management, production records, and financial analysis; different business entities and how they are structured; various agricultural leasing options; tax planning information; and market planning.
Prerequisites: FRM 2030
Corequisites: N/A


G


GEO 1010 Survey of Geology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This course is a study of the earth, its materials, its surface processes, internal processes and a brief account of earth's history.
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.
Corequisites: GEO 1015


GEO 1015 Survey of Geology Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: The Survey of Geology lab component allows for student application of the principles learned in Survey of Geology lecture.; It also teaches students skills necessary to apply these principles.; There is an emphasis on investigative learning.; In this course students will learn how to identify and interpret common minerals, rocks and fossils. In addition, students will learn to read and interpret topographic and geologic maps, aerial and satellite photos, and interpret landforms, geologic history and resources on these maps and photos. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or higher,, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.
Corequisites: GEO 1010


GEO 1050 Geology of the National Parks
Semester(s) Taught: Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This course is an introduction to the principles of geology as observed and studied in the national parks of a selected area. Designed for non-science majors. 3-4 weekend field trips or an approximately 2-week field trip will be required. A class fee is required to partially cover field trip expenses.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


GEO 1060 Introduction to Environmental Geology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This course is a study of the geological processes that affect or are affected by human activity such as earthquakes, volcanic hazards, flooding, waste, mineral and energy resources. This course is designed for non-majors. A field trip may be required.
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.
Corequisites: GEO 1065


GEO 1065 Introduction to Environmental Geology Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: In this course students will learn the skills necessary to assess geologic hazards, resources and waste.; These skills include identification of rocks and interpretation of aerial photographs and topographic and geologic maps.; Students will investigate various geologic hazards, contamination of water and air, and geologic resources. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.
Corequisites: GEO 1060


GEO 1110 Physical Geology
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This course is an introduction to physical geology. It includes an introduction to the materials and composition of the earth and the physical processes, both internal and external, that shape the earth. A field trip may be required.
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or equivalent, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.
Corequisites: GEO 1115


GEO 1115 Physical Geology Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: In this course students will learn how to identify common minerals and rocks, read and interpret topographic and geologic maps and aerial photographs. The course is designed for geology majors, related majors and others interested. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.
Corequisites: GEO 1110


GEO 1220 Historical Geology
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to the principles involved in deciphering the earth's past including the study of fossils. It will also cover the major physical and biological events in the earth's history. This course is designed for geology majors. A field trip will be required.
Prerequisites: GEO 1110 or 1010, ENGL 1010, MATH 1050, BIOL 1010 or permission of instructor
Corequisites: GEO 1225


GEO 1225 Historical Geology Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: In this course students will learn to apply to basic principles of historical geology including rock identification, sedimentology, relative and absolute dating, fossil identification, geologic map interpretation and interpretation of rocks in the field
Prerequisites: GEO 1110 or 1010, ENGL 1010, MATH 1050, BIOL 1010 or permission of instructor
Corequisites: GEO 1220


GEO 1700 Fundamentals of GPS and GIS Navigation
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course introduces fundamental navigation skills using handheld GPS units, compasses, and map reading skills. The class will also cover how to transfer and manipulate data onto basic GIS software to create usable maps.


GEO 1800 Interdisciplinary Introduction to GIS
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course is an interdisciplinary introduction for Geographical Information Systems (GIS). It covers general GIS applications and teaches fundamentals in the use of the current-version of ArcGIS by ESRI which is the widest used software in the field. The class includes hands-on experience with the software that will aid students planning careers in engineering, drafting, geology, geography, natural resources, law enforcement, many business fields, surveying, journalism, and many other areas. GPS will also be taught for producing input for GIS if time permits.
Prerequisites: None


GEO 1820 Intermediate GIS
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This course will cover principles of geographic data acquisition, processing, and display through digital methods. Students will learn how to use GIS to generate information for spatial-decision making and understand the limitations and pitfalls of using GIS in spatial analysis. This course is designed for non-majors and majors.
Prerequisites: GEO 1800 or GEOG 1800 or ENGR 1800


GEO 2501 Geology Field Studies I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This class is the study of specific areas in the field. The students will also be introduced to some of the basic skills required of a field geologist. The course will consist of a few short meetings and a three or four day field trip. This class is designed for majors and others interested. The field trip is required. This course may be repeated twice.
Prerequisites: GEO 1010 or 1110 or permission of instructor


GEO 2502 Geology Field Studies II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This class is the study of specific areas in the field. The students will also be introduced to some of the basic skills required of a field geologist. The course will consist of a few short meetings and a three or four day field trip. This class is designed for majors and others interested. The field trip is required. This course may be repeated twice.
Prerequisites: GEO 1010 or 1110 or permission of instructor


GEO 2845 Drone Operations and Safety Certification
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5:1)

Description: Safety training in natural resources helps students obtain the necessary skills and certifications to allow them to be employable in the field and perform required duties safely. This course will cover material necessary to pass the FAA Part 107 test to receive a small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) commercial pilot license. It will also overview drone operations and applications. This course is cross-listed as DRON 2845
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


GEO 2850 Cartography and Digital Mapmaking
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Cartography is the science and art of map making. Students will learn principles for creating maps that immediately and effectively communicate spatial relationships to a reader, applying those principles to their own maps over the course of the semester. This course is designed for non-majors and majors.
Prerequisites: Math 1010 (or equivalent), ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score, GEO 1800


GEO 2900 Applied GIS
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:4)

Description: This capstone course will allow students to use skills that they have learned in previous GIS courses to complete a semester-long, applied project using geographic information systems. Projects will be flexible, based largely on the interests of the students and proficiencies of the instructor. Students will create maps based on data collected and created first-hand, rather than relying solely on existing datasets. Students will also be encouraged to include a significant service component in their project.
Corequisites: GEO 1820


GEO 2901 Sophomore Capstone
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (.5:1:0)

Description: This capstone course forstudents majoring in the sciences, mathematics, or engineering is intended to broadentheir scientific horizons, acquaint them with various educational and careeropportunities in their fields, and actively prepare them for transfer to afour-year college or university. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: most of a lower division preparation in a Science, Math, or Engineering major, see course instructor


GEOG 1000 Physical Geography
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This course is an introduction to geographic analysis of the processes that operate in the earth's atmosphere (such as weather, winds, ocean currents, climate, and vegetation) and on the earth's surface (such as rivers, glaciers, wind, waves). This course is designed for non-majors and majors. (A field trip may be required.)
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.


GEOG 1005 Physical Geography Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: This course is a practical application of the principles of physical geography such as identification of geographic processes and their results using maps and aerial photographs, and quantitative techniques such as measuring humidity, sun angle. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or higher, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.


GEOG 1300 People and Places of the World
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course is a study of the major geographical regions of the world, emphasizing the interrelationships between people and the natural environment. The course focuses on the following topics in a region-by-region tour of the world: physical landscape features, population and settlement, cultural diversity and coherence, geopolitics, and economic/social development. Special attention is paid to current global issues, natural hazards, and the effects of globalization.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


GEOG 1400 Human Geography
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is a survey of the major sub-disciplines within human geography, including urban geography, cultural geography, population geography, health/medical geography, economic geography, and political geography. This course is designed for non-majors and majors.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


GEOG 1800 Interdisciplinary Introduction to GIS
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:2:4)

Description: This course is an interdisciplinary introduction for Geographical Information Systems (GIS). It covers general GIS applications and teaches fundamentals in the use of the current-version of ArcGIS by ESRI which is the widest used software in the field. The class includes hands-on experience with the software that will aid students planning careers in engineering, drafting, geology, geography, natural resources, law enforcement, many business fields, surveying, journalism, and many other areas. GPS will also be taught for producing input for GIS if time permits. There is also a service learning component to the course to give the students actual experience. This course is cross listed as ENGR 1800 and GEO 1800
Prerequisites: Math 0900 (or equivalent), ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score


GNST 0990 New Student Orientation
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This orientation is recommended for all first-year students at Snow College. The orientation is held before regular classes begin for Fall semester. The orientation is designed to help new students learn what they need to know to be successful learners at Snow College and to make helpful social connections. Students will not earn credit or a grade for the orientation, but their participation will be recorded.


GNST 1002 Principles of Peer Mentoring
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This seminar-based course is designed for students participating in peer leadership activities with other students. The focus of this course is on student development theory, practice and skill development.Mentoring skills and proficiencies will include, but are not limited to: leadership skills, listening skills, advising skills, problem-solving skills, and proper referral to campus resources.Successful completetion of this introductory course is required prior to enrolling in advanced peer mentoring coursework.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor is required.


GNST 1003 Peer Mentoring Practicum
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This seminar-based course is designed for Peer Mentors. The focus of this course is putting student development theory and skill development into practice. Mentoring skills and proficiencies will include, but are not limited to: leadership skills, listening skills, advising skills, problem-solving skills, and proper referral to campus resources.
Prerequisites: GNST 1002 & Permission of Instructor


GNST 1008 Global Inquiry Abroad
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This course provides students with a cultural and language experience in a foreign country. The course may be faculty-led, with a Snow College professor traveling with the students, or part of Snow College's partner universities reciprocal student exchange program. The course will be repeatable for credit, up to 3 credits.
Prerequisites: Approval from Center for Global Engagement


GNST 1010 Principles of Student Success
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course emphasizes the development of personal skills for success, encourages campus engagement, and explores majors and careers. The focus of the course will be academic skills, self-management skills, campus resources, the Snow College General Education curriculum and how student interests, skills and values can help them select a major.


GNST 1012 Fundamentals of Residence Life
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is an extension of the resident assistant training offered at the start of each semester. Throughout this course the resident assistant will understand the various roles of the resident assistant position, conflict mediation, program development and the complexities of student development. This course is designed to prepare resident assistants to aid students, provide resources, handle policies and develop a student community within their assigned residence halls.
Prerequisites: Be a hired Resident Assistant/Resident Director. No class prerequisites are necessary.


GNST 1020 College Success Skills
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to help students become more successful in the college setting, with an emphasis on graduating from Snow College and transferring to a university. Topics covered include effective time management and study skills (memory, reading, note taking, and testing); use of personal, campus, and community resources; creating effective communication skills, healthy lifestyles; and exploring financial issues. Emphasis is on group work, and requirements include group presentations. A team teaching format helps students learn to adjust to diverse teaching styles.
Prerequisites: Permission by Student Support Services required.


GNST 1060 Convocation: Snow College Arts and Lecture Series
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: The Convocation Arts and Lecture Series at Snow College is a weekly enrichment series for students and for residents of local communities. A 50-minute lecture, visual, or musical presentation is offered each Thursday at 12:30 p.m. Speakers and performers are selected from diverse disciplines, including humanities, arts, business, science, public service, education, entertainment, and ethnic/international areas of study. The series is also used as a vehicle for presenting faculty honor lectures and campus performing groups.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


GNST 1065 Convocation Plus
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Convocation Plus is a companion class for Convocation (GNST 1060). Students in Convocation may take Convocation Plus concurrently for an additional credit, and doing so allows students to further engage with Convocation content and presenters. This engagement includes attending lunch with presenters, doing additional readings, and having opportunities for discussion and reflection. Like Convocation, Convocation Plus is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: GNST 1060 (Convocation)


GNST 1070 Leadership Principles and Skills I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course provides student leaders and other interested students with the opportunity to learn key principles of leadership and to develop leadership skills. The course consists of lecture meetings to discuss and practice the principles of successful leaders within organizations, communities, and families. The curriculum covers three broad leadership areas: personal, interpersonal, and group leadership skills. The course provides an opportunity for students to assess their leadership skills. This course may be repeated for credit.


GNST 1080 Student Government and Leadership Principles II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course provides student leaders and other interested students with the opportunity to learn key principles of leadership and to develop leadership skills. The course consists of a weekly lecture to discuss and practice the principles of successful leaders within organizations, communities, families, and individuals. The course also consists of a weekly meeting of all student leaders to apply leadership principles to current student organizations and campus issues. The curriculum covers three broad leadership areas: personal, interpersonal, and group leadership skills. The course provides an opportunity for students to assess their leadership skills and to engage in service-learning. This course may be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: N/A


GNST 1100 Introduction to Civic Engagement and Service-Learning
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course will provide an opportunity to work with other students, community members, and community agencies in organizing and carrying out a service learning project that addresses an existing community issue or need. Students will learn the theory and philosophy behind service learning as a teaching pedagogy as they become more aware and engaged in the community. This course is required of students seeking the Service-Scholar designation. Repeatable for credit.


GNST 1200 GE Foundations
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Foundations (FND)
Description: In this course, we will study one thematic issue (e.g. cloning, GMOs, definitions of beauty) from three different disciplinary perspectives in order to understand ways in which knowledge is connected, dependent, and relevant. Additionally, this course will focus on the habits of mind (intellectual, motivational, emotional, self-awareness, and self-directedness) that are essential for becoming a learner in an interdisciplinary world. This course should be taken during the Freshman year. Additional fee required.


GNST 1500 Career Decisions
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course assists students in exploring, identifying and applying theories of individual, academic and career development. Students will evaluate career possibilities, opportunities and occupations that are appropriate for their abilities, interests, and personality in order to choose best-fit careers for a lifetime of satisfaction and success.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


GNST 1600 Dealing with Life
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide students with knowledge, insight, and life skills, as well as an understanding of realistic life expectations as they transition from high school to college and from young adulthood to adulthood. Students will receive information and participate in discussions on how to balance academics, family, recreation, social interaction, mental and physical health needs, and personal growth in order to minimize stress and anxiety and structure a life in which they may thrive.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


GNST 2010 Graduation Capstone Seminar
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This capstone course is a reflection on and assessment of student learning experiences leading to a degree or certificate from the College. It is also a preparation and planning for the student's next phase of education or career opportunities.
Prerequisites: 30 credit hours toward graduation or equivalent
Corequisites: N/A


GNST 2800 Special Projects
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This course involves a special project where there is a demonstrated need which cannot be met through enrollment in a regularly scheduled course. It also could include special projects of unusual merit in furthering a student's professional and academic goals. Students must be able to sustain and complete independent learning projects. The course provides a framework for developing and enhancing student abilities. The Special Projects Contract must be completed, and will indicate the department through which credit will be awarded. Special projects for one credit can be approved by the advisor, the division dean, and the division representative to the Curriculum Committee. Projects for more than one credit must be approved by the advisor, division dean, and Curriculum Committee. Credit for a special project normally should be one to two credit hours depending on the work completed, but may be more with approval of the dean and Curriculum Committee. Unless approved in the contract, special project credit may not be used to satisfy general education requirements. Repeatable for credit. (For students in Automotive Technology, see Auto 2900 Special Projects.)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


GNST 2875 Intercultural Experience Abroad
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:0)

Description: The Intercultural Experience Abroad course involves a semester abroad at Otemon Gakuin University. Students will experience life in Japan while undertaking courses such as: Japanese, Japanese traditions and culture, cross-cultural communication, Eastern vs Western ideas, Japanese Literature, Sogo-Shosa (Japanese work ethic), Introduction to Japanese Science Fiction, and Japanese Business. Each course will require a minimum of 21 classroom (contact) hours per semester. Students will also live in a homestay experience with a Japanese family for the duration of their stay.
Prerequisites: Acceptance by Otemon Gaukin University
Corequisites: Permission from Center for Global Engagement


GNST 2876 Intercultural Experience Abroad
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:0)

Description: The Intercultural Experience Abroad course involves a semester abroad at Otemon Gakuin University. Students will experience life in Japan while undertaking courses such as: Japanese, Japanese traditions and culture, cross-cultural communication, Eastern vs Western ideas, Japanese Literature, Sogo-Shosa (Japanese work ethic), Introduction to Japanese Science Fiction, and Japanese Business. Each course will require a minimum of 21 classroom (contact) hours per semester. Students will also live in a homestay experience with a Japanese family for the duration of their stay.
Prerequisites: Acceptance by Otemon Gaukin University
Corequisites: Permission from Center for Global Engagement


GNST 2925 Internship
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3-6:0:0)

Description: Internships are a discipline specific academic based work experience.; Students my earn 3 - 6 credit hour based on the number of hpurs worked.; Internships must be approved in advance by the appropriate Department Chair and Division Dean. Instructors permission required.
Prerequisites: Instructor
H


HESC 1050 Medical Terminology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: Medical Terminology is a study of the nomenclature of medicine and related fields of health care. Students learn the origins and definitions of root words, affixes, and abbreviations used in health care today. This course is recommended for anyone interested in a health or medical field of study. It is a prerequisite for a number of medical training programs.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


HESC 1500 EMT - Emergency Medical Technician
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (7:5:2)

Description: This is an intensive course in pre-hospital emergency care that is in compliance with the National EMS Education Standards and Utah State Bureau of Emergency Medical Services for EMT. Students successfully completing this course may be eligible for state certification as an EMT. There are 130-150 hours of class, 10 hours of clinical in a hospital and ambulance association, and approximately 15 hours of patient assessments (100) required of each student. Additional State and college fees apply. Technical, academic, and physical standards for this course are outlined in the Declaration of Understanding of Technical and Academic and Physical Standards for the EMT, from the Utah Department of Health, Bureau of Emergency Medical Services. This document is available from the instructor. If students have questions about their ability to complete the course work necessary to certify as an EMT, they should obtain the document and determine their eligibility before registering for the course.
Prerequisites: CPR certification (State requirement) Be 18 years-old before their test date with the National Registry


HFST 1020 Scientific Foundations of Nutrition
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Life Science (LS)
Description: Scientific Foundations of Nutrition is designed to introduce students to the science of human nutrition and inspire personal application of the principles taught. Concepts to be studied include the basic nutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and water), their chemical composition, digestion, metabolism, physiological function, dietary recommendations, food sources, and deficiency and toxicity symptoms. Obesity, weight management, energy balance, and food and water safety will also be covered.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


HFST 1130 Quiltmaking Styles and Techniques
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: Through the process of completing a pieced quilt, students will apply design principles and elements and learn and practice sewing skills.; Students will also be introduced to contemporary and historical textiles.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


HFST 1140 Introductory Sewing
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:2)

Description: This course is an introduction to clothing construction and is geared toward the beginning sewing student. Students will use home sewing machines and sergers to construct projects, including a project for humanitrian aid. No previous sewing experience is needed.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


HFST 1210 Personal and Consumer Finance
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course will introduce personal and consumer financial concepts and give students basic tools to make sound financial decisions in today's society based on economic trends and research.This is a practical course in personal money management consisting of financial planning including career choices, budgeting, planning for retirement, financing a home and automobile, and understanding consumer credit, taxes, insurance, and investments. Students will use basic math skills as well as read, write, and think critically.Note: This course is cross-listed as BUS 1210 and meets general education requirements for Social and Behavioral Science.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


HFST 1240 Introductory Foods
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is designed to be an introductory course in food science and meal preparation. It introduces basic concepts necessary to the Family and Consumer Science Education major, the Culinary Arts major, and the Food Science Major. It is also appropriate for any student interested in the field. The lecture session includes a lab component.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: HFST 1245


HFST 1245 Introductory Foods Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is the lab component to HFST 1240 Introductory Foods. Students will put into practice the principles learned in class culminating with the planning and preparing a meal for four guests.Students must also register for HFST 1240. (Lab fee required)
Corequisites: Students must also register for HFST 1240


HFST 1260 Weight Control and Eating Behaviors
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This class provides students with information and experience to evaluate positive and negative behaviors and beliefs regarding food, eating, weight, and body image. Principles of good nutrition and eating habits are especially applied to contemporary problems of weight control, eating disorders and body image as they appy to lifespan development. The course provides introductory-level information to majors as well as help to those interested in the subject matter.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


HFST 1300 Personal and Family Health
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is an overview of health issues affecting the individual and the family. Discussion focuses on improving personal lifestyle decisions and preventing rather than curing illnesses.


HFST 1400 Courtship and Marriage
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course is designed to help students understand and apply the research and literature which attempts to identify the principles, skills, and theories that help lead to successful marriages and families.


HFST 1500 Human Development
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: In this course students learn about the fundamental principles of growth and development from conception through childhood to old age. The course includes the study of the biological process of development, as well as the emotional, social, psychological, and cognitive development of the individual within a cultural and historical context. This course is cross-listed with Psychology 1100.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


HFST 1600 Child Care As A Business
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course surveys the many challenges and rewards of owning and managing a child care facility. The course specifically addresses trends in child care, setting up a child care business, legal issues, and staffing.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


HFST 1750 Introduction to Interior Design
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This general education course acquaints students with the visual and technical language of Interior Design. Through education of the principles of design, this course will foster design sensibility as it is applied to residential space and structure. Emphasis will be placed on using space effectively, the selection and arrangement of furnishings and residential materials, and the application of relevant theory related to everyday living experiences. Students will create a comprehensive design portfolio and complete a client-based design project in order to demonstrate their competency in design and composition analysis, presentation/communication of design solutions, understanding of historical influences, creative thinking, and identification of effective design solutions. This course also introduces students to the professional aspects of a career in Interior Design.


HFST 1997 Home and Family Studies Internship I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This is an internship in the Home and Family Studies Department. Students can choose an internship opportunity in Early Childhood Education, Daycare, Foods, Sewing, Human Development, or Consumer Services. Internships are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the workplace. Internships are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a faculty member in the chosen discipline and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Additional fees required. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.


HFST 2040 Intermediate Sewing
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:4)

Description: This course includes intermediate level sewing techniques.Students use home sewing machines and sergers to construct at least four projects. Projects may be clothing, accessories, or sewn items for other uses. A variety of techniques will be demonstrated in class. Students will complete and complie a portfolio of sewing skills. The class is individualized to allow students to build skills from their own level of competency. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


HFST 2100 Family Resource Management
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course emphasizes the principles that help individuals and families to make decisions and to solve problems, helping students to understand the significance of goals, planning, values, and strategies in the management of personal and family economic, human, and environmental resources.


HFST 2120 Foods and Nutrition for Children
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:1)

Description: This course presents principles of food and nutrition as they relate to the needs of children. It explores characteristics and abilities of young children and encourages the integration of food and nutrition concepts into the early childhood classroom.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


HFST 2230 Concepts of Cosplay
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This course integrates the knowledge and methodologies of multiple disciplines including: individualized sewing instruction, allowing students to build skills from their own level of competency; examining the impact that playing a character has on personality and behavior, and gaining better understanding into personality theories and how they might influence identification with characters; techniques and artistry of make-up, stage presentation and commitment to your character; origin of Cosplay; and 3-D development of props.


HFST 2250 Personal and Consumer Management
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course covers the effective use of management theory in dealing with human and material resources; designed to teach basic skills needed to be a competent consumer; the relationship between management of time, energy, money and other resources necessary for effective living.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


HFST 2400 Family Relations
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course provides students with a realistic, engaging, personally relevant, and academically informative introduction to the study of intimate relationships, marriage, and families. The course discusses family theory (family systems theory, structure function theory, exchange theory, conflict theory, family development theory etc.), using examples taken from contemporary literature, professional journals, and film.


HFST 2500 Early Childhood Development
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course will focus on the fundamental principles of growth and development from conception through early and middle childhood. The study of the relevant theories and research in the biological, social, emotional and cognitive development of young children will also be included.
Prerequisites: HFST 1500 - Human Development or Instructor


HFST 2600 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course presents an overview of current philosophies, teaching techniques and curriculum found in early childhood programs. The historical roots of early childhood programs will be examined, as well as current political issues and the ethical conduct of early childhood professionals.
Prerequisites: HFST 1500 - Human Development or Instructor


HFST 2610 Guidance of Young Children
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: In this course students develop skills and techniques associated with child guidance principles, with a focus on meeting children's needs, individually and in groups, in the Child Development Lab. These principles may also be applied to other child care settings such as the home, as a nanny and in the primary grades of elementary school. Two hours a week of lab are required.
Prerequisites: HFST 1500 - Human Development or Instructor Permission
Corequisites: N/A


HFST 2620 Creative Experiences for Children
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course offers experiences in planning and implementing activities that will encourage intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of young children. Students are required to complete a minumum of 24 lab hours in the Snow College Child Development Lab. The skills developed are directed specifically to the philosophy and resources of Snow College's Child Development Lab, but will be adaptable for use in other day cares, preschools, early elementary grade classrooms, and in parenting.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


HFST 2635 Practicum In Preschool Training B
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course consists of an extended experience as a teacher in the child development lab. It includes experiences in curriculum and environment planning and organization, direction of activities, guidance of young children, and parent teacher relationships. HFST 2635 is highly recommended for students who are interested in Child Care Management and Early Childhood Education. HFST 2635 is required as a core course in the Child Care Management Applied Associate Degree Program. Seminar in Preschool Teaching (HFST 2760) must be taken concurrently with this course. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: HFST 1500, 2610, 2620; permission of instructor
Corequisites: HFST 2760 Seminar in Preschool Training


HFST 2750 Practicum In Preschool Training
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:0:15)

Description: This course consists of an extended experience as a teacher in the department preschool lab. It includes experiences in curriculum and environment planning and organization, direction of activities, guidance of young children, and parent teacher relationships. HFST 2750 is required as a core course in the Child Care Management Program. Seminar in Preschool Teaching (HFST 2760) must be taken concurrently with this course.
Prerequisites: HFST 1500, 2610, 2620; permission of instructor
Corequisites: HFST 2760 Seminar in Preschool Teaching


HFST 2760 Seminar In Preschool Teaching
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course will provide the forum for students to discuss and plan their practicum in preschool teaching. It includes experiences in curriculum writing and environment planning and organization. HFST 2760 is required as a core course in the Child Care Management program and highly recommended for students interested in Early Childhood Education. Practicum in Preschool Training (HFST 2630, 2635) must be taken concurrently with this course.
Prerequisites: HFST 1500, 2610, 2620; and permission of the instructor
Corequisites: HFST 2630 & HFST 2635 Practicum in Preschool Training


HFST 2850 Special Topics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This course is designed to address a special topic associated with the discipline that may not be included as a part of the normal curriculum.; Topics may be extensions of current field of study or it may include possible future additions to the departmental curriculum.


HFST 2880 Practicum In Preschool Training I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:9)

Description: This course consists of on-the-job learning opportunities for prospective preschool teaching and daycare teaching. A student taking this course will be a Head Preschool Teacher in our Child Development Lab. The course includes experiences in curriculum writing, environment planning and organization, direction of activities, guidance of young children, and parent-teacher relationships. HFST 2880 is a required capstone class for students completing an Applied Associate Degree in Child Care Management. HFST 2880 is highly recommended for students interested in Early Childhood Education or Child Development. Seminar in Preschool Teaching (HFST 2990) must be taken concurrently with this course. (Additional fee required). This course was formerly HFST 2630
Prerequisites: HFST 1500, 2610, 2620; permission of instructor
Corequisites: HFST 2990


HFST 2885 Practicum In Preschool Training II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course consists of on-the-job learning opportunities for prospective preschool teaching and daycare teaching. A student taking this course will be a Head Preschool Teacher in our Child Development Lab. The course includes experiences in curriculum writing, environment planning and organization, direction of activities, guidance of young children, and parent teacher relationships. HFST 2885 is a required capstone class for students completing an Applied Associate Degree in Child Care Management. HFST 2885 is highly recommended for students interested in Early Childhood Education or Child Development. Seminar in Preschool Teaching (HFST 2990) must be taken concurrently with this course. (Additional fee required). This course was formerly HFST 2635
Prerequisites: HFST 1500, 2610, 2620; permission of instructor
Corequisites: HFST 2990 Seminar in Preschool Training


HFST 2990 Seminar In Preschool Teaching
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course will provide a forum for students to discuss and plan their practicum in preschool teaching. It includes experiences in child guidance, curriculum writing, environment planning and organization, and parent education opportunities. HFST 2990 is required as a core course in the Child Care Management program and highly recommended for students interested in Early Childhood Education. Practicum in Preschool Training (HFST 2880 and 2885) must be taken concurrently with this course. This course was previously HFST 2760. This course is repeatable. This course was previously HFST 2760.
Prerequisites: HFST 1500, 2610, 2620; and permission of the instructor
Corequisites: HFST 2880 & HFST 2885 Practicum in Preschool Training


HFST 2997 Home and Family Studies Internship II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This is an internship in the Home and Family Studies Department. Students can choose an internship opportunity in Early Childhood Education, Daycare, Foods, Sewing, Human Development, or Consumer Services. Internships are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the workplace. Internships are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a faculty member in the chosen discipline and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Additional fees required. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.


HIST 1220 Modern Asian Civilization
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course presents a survey history of Asia from the 1500s to the present.; As each individual society has rich depth and complex historical events, the course pursues a country-by-country analysis of areas east of Afghanistan and south of the former Soviet Union.
Prerequisites: N/A


HIST 1500 Ancient World Civilization
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course explores the history of the world from the earliest times into the 14th century. Emphasis is placed on the cultural and intellectual aspects of both Western and non-Western civilizations which established the foundations for their subsequent historical developments.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


HIST 1510 Modern World Civilizations
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course explores the history of the World from the European Renaissance into the 21st century. Emphasis is placed on the political, cultural, and intellectual developments over the past six centuries on a global scale. Attention is paid to the commonalities, uniqueness, and interaction between Western and non-Western civilizations.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


HIST 1700 American Civilization
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: American Institutions (AI)
Description: This course is designed to provide an introduction into American history from pre-contact Native American societies through the present day.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


HIST 2700 United States History to 1877
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: American Institutions (AI)
Description: This course covers the development of the United States to 1877, to include the Colonial Period, the American Revolution, the Nationalistic Period, Westward Expansion, Sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. HIST 2700, taken in conjunction with HIST 2710, will satisfy the American Institutions requirement established by the Utah State Legislature.


HIST 2710 United States History from 1877
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: American Institutions (AI)
Description: This course covers the development of the United States from 1877 to the present, to include Industrialism, the Last Frontier, the Progressive Era, World War I, the Roaring Twenties, the Great Depression and New Deal, World War II, the Cold War Era, the Civil Rights Movement, and Contemporary America. HIST 2710, taken in conjunction with HIST 2700, will satisfy the American Institutions requirement established by the Utah State Legislature.


HIST 2900 Special Topics in American History
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course provides an in-depth study of a particular topic in American History. It involves readings, discussions, and writing assignments. Students will explore the social, political, and cultural issues of a given historical era and draw connections to contemporary American society.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


HONR 2850 Honors Interdisciplinary Studies
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed for honors students and focuses on interdisciplinary topics. The specific subject for any given semester will be shown in the class schedule and course advertisement materials. While class topics will vary from semester to semester, the course will emphasize issues and topics that can be studied by multiple academic disciplines. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


HONR 2850 Honors Interdisciplinary Studies
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Integrated Exploration (IE)
Description: This course is designed for honors students and focuses on interdisciplinary topics. The specific subject for any given semester will be shown in the class schedule and course advertisement materials. While class topics will vary from semester to semester, the course will emphasize issues and topics that can be studied by multiple academic disciplines. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


HONR 2851 Honors Interdisciplinary Studies in Science
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Science Inquiry (SI)
Description: This course is designed for honors students and focuses on interdisciplinary topics. The specific subject for any given semester will be shown in the class schedule and course advertisement materials. While class topics willvary from semester to semester, the course will emphasize issues and topics that can be studied by multiple academic disciplines, and the class will be designed to meet the requirements for Science Inquiry GE credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


HONR 2852 Honors Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is designed for honors students and focuses on interdisciplinary topics building off of a humanities-based platform. The specific subject for any given semester will be shown in the class schedule and course advertisement materials. While humanities-based class topics will vary from semester to semester, the course will emphasize issues and topics that can be studied by multiple academic disciplines.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


I


INDM 1050 Industrial Safety
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This course teaches the rights and responsibilities of workers in the workplace to ensure industrial safety. Students will gain valuable knowledge about how they can protect themselves and others in industrial settings. Students will explore a wide range of topics, including laws, guidelines, behaviors, and equipment related to industrial safety.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


INDM 1100 Industrial Mechanics I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course is designed to introduce the basics of industrial mechanical systems. This course begins a series of four courses designed to prepare students to understand and recognize mechanical systems they will encounter on the job. Students will learn relevant industrial skills, including mechanical drive systems, key fasteners, power transmission systems, v-belt drives, chain drives, spur gear drives and multiple shaft drives. Students will learn basic measuring for industrial applications using basic measurement tools to include: digital calipers, micrometers and dial calipers.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


INDM 1200 Industrial Mechanics II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: The course teaches the bearings and gears used in heavy duty mechanical transmission systems. This course will emphasize linear axis drives, clutches and brakes. In addition, this course teaches how to setup, operate and apply laser shaft alignment to a variety of industrial applications. Topics include: heavy-duty v-belt drives, v-belt selection and maintenance, synchronous belt drives, lubrication concepts, precision shaft alignment, couplings and heavy-duty chain drives. Students will also learn the basics of vibration analysis used to determine when to perform maintenance of power transmission components.
Prerequisites: INDM 1100


INDM 1300 Industrial Mechanics III
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course teaches the bearings and gears used in heavy duty mechanical transmission systems. This course will emphasize bearing mechanics, selection and maintenance. Topics include: plain bearings, ball bearings, roller bearings, anti-friction bearing selection, gaskets and seals and gear drive selection. In addition, this course teaches how to set up, operate and apply laser shaft alignment systems to a variety of industrial applications. Topics include laser alignment systems, rough alignment, soft foot correction, alignment analysis and operation
Prerequisites: Prerequisites: INDM 1200
Corequisites: N/A


INDM 1400 Industrial Mechanics IV
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course teaches linear axis drives, clutches, brakes, piping, fittings and valves. Students will learn relevant industrial skills including identifying, sizing, selecting, installation, operation, performing analysis, design, troubleshooting and maintenance as well as installing a variety of types of piping, fittings and valves including iron pipe, steel tubing, hydraulic hose, plastic pipe, copper tubing, globe valves, gate valves, check valves, and Sloan valves.
Prerequisites: INDM 1100, 1200, and 1300
Corequisites: N/A


INDM 1500 Industrial Pneumatics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course teaches the fundamentals of pneumatic systems using industrial, agricultural and mobile applications. Students will learn skills in the following areas: safety, basic pneumatic systems design, installation, operation, and performance analysis. Student will also be skilled in more advanced concepts of air logic, ways to decelerate a pneumatic cylinder, how to prevent condensation in a pneumatic circuit, DCV applications, and maintenance.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


INDM 1600 Industrial Electrical
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course teaches industry-relevant fundamentals of AC/DC electrical systems used for power and control in industrial, commercial, agricultural, and residential applications as well as commercial and residential applications including single phase AC motors and three-phase AC electric motors, DC electric motors, and DC generators. Students will learn skills in how to operate, install, analyze performance, select electric machines for various applications, design, and troubleshoot basic AC/DC electrical circuits for various applications.


INDM 1620 Industrial Electronics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course teaches electronic devices control and power machines used in industries throughout the world, from manufacturing and transportation to energy and construction. Students will learn to operate, adjust, and troubleshoot electronic components, circuits, and systems used in these vital machine applications.


INDM 1800 Industrial Hydraulics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course introduces industry-relevant hydraulic skills while showing the fundamentals of the hydraulic principles, hydraulic motors and actuators, and hydraulic formulas such as calculating theoretical pump flow rate. Students learning skills will include: safety, how to operate, install, troubleshoot, analyze performance, and design hydraulic systems. Students will also be skilled in more advanced hydraulics.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


INDM 1820 Industrial Pumps
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course teaches a comprehensive set of industry-relevant skills including how to operate, install, maintain, troubleshoot, analyze performance, and select centrifugal pumps as well as system design. Students will learn skills related to centrifugal pumps, which are used in almost every industry to transfer non-hydraulic fluids of various types from one place to another.


INDM 1840 Industrial Rigging
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course teaches a comprehensive set of industry-relevant skills including how to safely move loads of difference shapes and sizes using a variety of methods. Students will learn skills including hoist operation, installation, maintenance, equipment movement, wire mesh slings, synthetic slings, knots, load turning and cranes.


INDM 1900 Industrial Controls and PLC
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course teaches industry-relevant skills including how to operate, interface, program, and troubleshoot Programmable Logic Controller systems for a variety of applications.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


INDM 2800 Special Projects
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:0:3-6)

Description: This course involves a special project where there is a demonstrated need which cannot be met through enrollment in a regularly scheduled course. It also could include special projects of unusual merit in furthering a student's professional and academic goals. Students must be able to sustain and complete independent learning projects. The course provides a framework for developing and enhancing student abilities. The Special Projects Contract must be completed, and will indicate the department through which credit will be awarded. Special projects for one credit can be approved by the advisor, the division dean, and the division representative to the Curriculum Committee. Projects for more than one credit must be approved by the advisor, division dean, and Curriculum Committee. Credit for a special project normally should be one to two credit hours depending on the work completed, but may be more with approval of the dean and Curriculum Committee. Unless approved in the contract, special project credit may not be used to satisfy general education requirements. Repeatable for credit. (This course is equivalent to GNST 2800.)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


ITAL 1010 Elementary Italian I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

Description: Italian 1010 provides an introduction to the language and culture of Italy. It is designed for students with no previous Italian study. During the course students develop basic communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Italian in a variety of situations. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation.
Prerequisites: None


ITAL 1020 Elementary Italian II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: Foreign Language (FL)
Description: This course is a continuation of ITAL 1010 and provides additional exposure to the Italian language and the cultures of Italian-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed ITAL 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Italian in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Italian at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in Italian, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.
Prerequisites: ITAL 1010 or equivalent
Corequisites: None


ITAL 2950 Undergraduate Tutoring
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:0:3-6)

Description: This course is for native or more proficient speakers of Italian who will help beginning students review, strengthen, and apply language skills taught in all Italian courses at Snow College. This includes both conversation practice and grammar instruction. Tutors may be asked to proofread documents, grade quizzes or homework, provide feedback, and perform other small tasks as directed by the instructor. Tutors receive training and support from the instructor.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval and advanced proficiency in Italian.
Corequisites: None.


J


JAPN 1010 Elementary Japanese I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

Description: This course provides an introduction to the Japanese language and the cultures of Japanese-speaking peoples. It is designed for students with no previous Japanese study. During the course, students develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Japanese in a variety of situations, including conversation, grammar, pronunciation, reading and writing. Numerous kanji characters are introduced. Elemental cultural themes are also explored. Students meet with the instructor daily, and are assigned individually to native-speaking and other language-proficient tutorial assistants for additional in-class as well as out-of-class practice. Field trips, internships, Japanese Club activities, a study abroad program, and a speech contest are all sponsored.; This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation and basic conversation practice in Japanese.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


JAPN 1020 Elementary Japanese II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: Foreign Language (FL)
Description: This course is a continuation of JAPN 1010 and provides additional exposure to the Japanese language and the cultures of Japanese-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed JAPN 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Japanese in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Japanese at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in Japanese, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.
Prerequisites: JAPN 1010 or equivalent or permission of instructor
Corequisites: None


JAPN 2950 Undergraduate Tutoring
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:0:3-6)

Description: This course is for students with native or advanced proficiency in Japanese who wish to use their knowledge to help other students review, strengthen, and apply language skills taught in all Japanese courses at Snow College. This includes both conversation practice and grammar instruction. Tutors may be asked to proofread documents, grade quizzes or homework, provide feedback, and perform other small tasks as directed by the instructor. Tutors will receive training and support from the instructor.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval and advanced proficiency in Japanese.
Corequisites: None.


K


KORE 1010 Elementary Korean I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

Description: This course provides an introduction to the Korean language and the cultures of Korean-speaking peoples. It is designed for students with no previous Korean study. During the course, students develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Korean in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Korean at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation and basic conversation practice in Korean.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


KORE 1020 Elementary Korean II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: Foreign Language (FL)
Description: This course is a continuation of KORE 1010 and provides additional exposure to the Korean language and the cultures of Korean-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed KORE 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Korean in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Korean at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in Korean, and additional focus on reading and writing.
Prerequisites: KORE 1010 or equivalent or permission of instructor


KORE 2950 Undergraduate Tutoring
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:0:3-6)

Description: This course is for students with native or advanced proficiency in Korean who wish to use their knowledge to help other students review, strengthen, and apply language skills taught in all Korean courses at Snow College. This includes both conversation practice and grammar instruction. Tutors may be asked to proofread documents, grade quizzes or homework, provide feedback, and perform other small tasks as directed by the instructor. Tutors will receive training and support from the instructor.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval and advanced proficiency in Korean.
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MANF 1060 Industrial Print Reading
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course is an introduction to reading and interpreting working drawings and prints for industrial processes and associated trades. Students will receive basic information on blueprints and written documents commonly found in industrial environments. The course is designed to allow the student to develop an understanding of the use of prints and an ability to read and interpret prints found in industrial settings.


MANF 1100 Manufacturing Automation
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course teaches manufacturing and automation technology, providing a complete course of the basic elements of manufacturing and automation and how they affect the world that we live in. This course covers the materials, processes, and management techniques used in the industry. Manufacturing is a managed system that draws upon many resources. Students will explore a number of materials and material processing techniques common to manufacturing.


MANF 1200 Intro to Industrial Robotics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This is an introductory level course that will explore many aspects of robotics in a basic and easy-to-understand manner. The key concepts are discussed using a big picture or systems approach that greatly enhances student learning. Many application and operational aspects of equipment and robotic systems are discussed.


MANF 1300 Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course will provide students with the complete fundamentals of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing concepts which will be introduced to the students in a methodical manner to help ensure that they have a full understanding of every basic concept as they build knowledge toward more advanced application.


MANF 1350 Manufacturing Process
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course will provide students with a complete view into the manufacturing process. By having students view many different fields and by studying the process students will have a better understanding into the world of manufacturing. Students will be provided with a comprehensive survey of hundreds of materials and processes, which can be used at both introductory and advanced levels in manufacturing. Student to learn how to find better way to make quality products faster, better, and cheaper.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


MANF 1400 Composites
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course will provide students with both introductory and advanced levels in composites. Students will have comprehensive and hands-on experiences. They will be creating reliable methods and processes for composites, which will help students learn how to find ways to make quality products faster, better, and cheaper.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


MANF 1500 Quality Control
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course will provide students with a greater understanding of the complexities of quality improvement efforts and will give the students real-life situations through each application. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of quality principles, interpretations, understanding, and concepts throughout the problem-solving process. Students will have a full understanding of basic concepts as they build knowledge toward more advanced applications in quality control.


MANF 2332 Mechanical CAD Drafting (Formerly DRFT 2332)
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:3:3)

Description: The course will introduce the student to the 3D modeling process and 3D parametric modeling. It will present a process-based approach to mechanical drafting using solid modeling commands, options, and techniques. Students will experience the power of solid modeling with a parametric modeling program, as they complete parts, assemblies and working drawings. Formerly DRFT 2332.
Corequisites: None


MATH 0700 Pre-Algebra
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:4:0)

Description: The developmental math sequence (Math 0700, 0800, 1010 OR 0700, 0850) at Snow College is designed to prepare you for more rigorous college-level math courses (1050 and 1080 in the first case AND 1030 and 1040 in the second case). As you progress through the sequence, you will hone your understanding and proficiency with basic mathematics and algebra content.The content will begin with a review of basic arithmetic on signed numbers, fractions, and decimals.; Percents, ratios and proportions are covered.; Students will also learn to simplify and evaluate arithmetic and algebraic expressions of the appropriate level with expressions and equations.; They will also work with application problems.
Prerequisites: An ACT math score 14 or below or an appropriate placement test score. (See the advisement center for more information.)
Corequisites: None


MATH 0800 Beginning Algebra
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: The developmental math sequence (Math 0700, 0800, 1010 OR 0700, 0850) at Snow College is designed to prepare you for more rigorous college-level math courses (1050 and 1080 in the first case AND 1030 and 1040 in the second case). As you progress through the sequence, you will hone your understanding and proficiency with basic mathematics and algebra content.Covered content will include: the real number system, order of operations with fractions, exponents, linear equations and inequalities in one and two variables, application problems, polynomials, factoring, and radicals.
Prerequisites: An ACT of 15-17 or successful completion of Math 0700 or its equivalent or appropriate placement score. (See Student Success Office for more information.)
Corequisites: None


MATH 0850 Math Literacy
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:5:0)

Description: Math 0850 prepares a student to go directly to either Math 1030 or Math 1040. A student may also use this course in place of Math 0800 and then continue to Math 1010 and on to Math 1050 or Math 1080. Students will study algebra, statistics, geometry and measurement systems. There is an emphasis on application problems. A graphing calculator and internet access are required.
Prerequisites: ACT of 15-22 or successful completion of Math 0700 or its equivalent or appropriate placement test score (Accuplacer)


MATH 1010 Intermediate Algebra
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: The recommended developmental math sequence at Snow College for STEM-bound students (Math 0700, 0800/0850,1010) is designed to prepare students for more rigorous college-level STEM math courses (Math 1050 or 1080). The recommended developmental math sequence for non-STEM students (Math 0700, 0850) is designed to prepare students for the more rigorous math courses (Math 1030 or 1040). As students progress through either sequence, they will hone their understanding and proficiency with basic mathematics and algebra content. Covered content introduces a study of the properties of the real number system including the use of set and/or interval notation and performing operations on the real numbers. Students will continue their use of variables and the simplifying and evaluating of algebraic expressions. Solving and graphing of linear and quadratic equations along with an introduction to linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions will be covered.
Prerequisites: Math 0800 or Math 0850 with a C or better, ACT math score 18 - 22, or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or you must (re)take the placement test.
Corequisites: None


MATH 1010 Intermediate Algebra*
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:5:0)

Description: The recommended developmental math sequence at Snow College for STEM-bound students (Math 0700, 0800/0850,1010) is designed to prepare students for more rigorous college-level STEM math courses (Math 1050 or 1080). The recommended developmental math sequence for non-STEM students (Math 0700, 0850) is designed to prepare students for the more rigorous math courses (Math 1030 or 1040). As students progress through either sequence, they will hone their understanding and proficiency with basic mathematics and algebra content.Covered content introduces a study of the properties of the real number system including the use of set and/or interval notation and performing operations on the real numbers. Students will continue their use of variables and the simplifying and evaluating of algebraic expressions. Solving and graphing of linear and quadratic equations along with an introduction to linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions will be covered. * This section of Math 1010 is for Student Support students only.
Prerequisites: Math 0800 or Math 0850 with a C or better, ACT math score 18 - 22, or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or you must (re)take the placement test.


MATH 1030 Quantitative Literacy
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Quantitative Literacy (MA)
Description: This course provides an introduction to mathematical modeling and problem solving utilizing algebra, discrete mathematics, geometry and statistics. Furthermore, students will examine some of the greatest ideas of humankind ideas comparable to the works of Shakespeare, Plato, and Michelangelo. Imagination, creativity, and sound logic will all be crucial components of these mathematical explorations. The overarching theme of the course is to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for math and its many applications to the world around us. There are three basic goals for this course: To attain a better understanding of some rich mathematical ideas; To build sharper skills for analyzing life issues that transcend mathematics; To develop a new perspective and outlook on the way you view the world.
Prerequisites: Math 0850 or Math 1010 with a C or better course grade, ACT math score 21 or higher or appropriate placement test score.
Corequisites: none


MATH 1040 Introduction to Statistics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Quantitative Literacy (MA)
Description: Introduction to Statistics is an elementary introduction to the nature of statistical reasoning. Topics to be covered include descriptive statistics, sampling and data collection, basic probability, sampling distribution, and introduction to inference including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Graphing calculator required (TI-83 preferred).
Prerequisites: Math 850 or Math 1010 with a C or better course grade, ACT math score 22 or higher or appropriate placement test score.


MATH 1050 College Algebra
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

General Ed Requirement: Quantitative Literacy (MA)
Description: In this course students will study polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Additional topics include sequences and series, conic sections, matrices, the binomial theorem, modeling, and graphing technology. This course prepares students for trigonometry and calculus.
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT Math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or student must (re-)take placement test.


MATH 1060 Trigonometry
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Quantitative Literacy (MA)
Description: This course will cover trigonometric functions, definitions, radian measure, graphs, solving trigonometric equations, vectors, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines,complex numbers, polar coordinates. Graphing calculator required.
Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in Math 1010, ACT math score 23 or higher or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or student must (re-) take placement test.


MATH 1080 Pre-Calculus
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: Quantitative Literacy (MA)
Description: In this course students will study polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, relations, and applications.; Additional topics include sequences and series, conic sections, matrices, the binomial theorem, modeling, and graphing technology. This course prepares students for calculus.
Prerequisites: A grade of B or higher in Math 1010 or equivalent, an ACT score of 25 or higher, or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or student must (re-) take placement test.


MATH 1100 Applied Calculus
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: Applied Calculus introduces the techniques of elementary calculus for functions of one variable including differentiation and integration. Applications are emphasized in the areas of biological, management and social sciences. Techniques of calculus of several variables including partial differentiation and multiple integrals are introduced.
Prerequisites: MATH 1050 or MATH 1080 with a grade of at least a C, ACT math score of 25 or higher, or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or student must (re-)take placement test.


MATH 1210 Calculus I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to calculus: functions and their limits, especially as applied to derivatives and integrals. Topics include continuity of functions, techniques and applications of differentiation (related rates, graphing, and optimization), and elementary techniques and applications of integration. These topics are applied to algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
Prerequisites: Math 1050 and Math 1060 or Math 1080 with a C or better, ACT math score of 36 or higher, or appropriate placement test score. Prerequisite score or class must have been completed within the last two years or student must (re-)take placement test.


MATH 1220 Calculus II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This course is a continuation of the study of calculus. Topics include techniques of integration and applications, numeric integration techniques, calculus in conic sections and polar coordinates, infinite sequences and series (tests for convergence), and introduction to vectors.
Prerequisites: Math 1210


MATH 2010 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I is the first of a two-course series designed to improve the mathematical understanding of prospective elementary teachers. Concepts covered include problem-solving, sets, functions, numeration systems, number theory, rational numbers (fractions), decimals, percents, and integers. The course will combine a thorough treatment of mathematical concepts with pedagogical philosophy to help prospective teachers learn to teach mathematics with understanding and insight.
Prerequisites: MATH 1050 with a C or better


MATH 2020 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II is the second of a two-course series designed to improve the mathematical understanding of prospective elementary teachers. Concepts covered include basic statistics, probability, properties of geometric shapes, measurement using English and Metric systems, geometry using triangle congruence (including constructions), and geometry using transformations. The course will combine a thorough treatment of mathematical concepts with pedagogical philosophy to help prospective teachers learn to teach mathematics with understanding and insight.
Prerequisites: MATH 1050 with a C or better


MATH 2040 Applied Statistics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: Applied Statistics is the study of the nature of statistical reasoning and includes topics such as descriptive statistics, sampling and data collection, probability, hypothesis testing including Chi Square and Analysis of Variance, correlation and regression. This course is primarily for business and mathematics/statistics majors. Graphing calculator required (TI-83/84 preferred).
Prerequisites: MATH 1050 or MATH 1080 with a C or better


MATH 2210 Calculus III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is a continuation of the study of calculus. Topics include vectors in two and three-dimensional space, quadric surfaces, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, calculus of vector-valued functions, partial derivatives and the gradient, limits and continuity of functions of several variables, vector fields and line integrals, multiple integrals, Green's, Stoke's, and Divergence Theorems.
Prerequisites: Math 1220 with a C or better


MATH 2250 Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This course explores methods of solving ordinary differential equations which describe much of the physical phenomena in our world. The course introduces principles of linear algebra to facilitate the analysis of systems of differential equations. Linear algebra topics will include matrix operations, vector spaces, systems of linear equations, and eigensystems. The course examines techniques for solving linear and nonlinear first-order differential equations as well as higher-order linear equations. Other topics will include initial-value and boundary-value problems, Laplace transforms, numerical methods, and modeling.The course is designed for students with majors in specific engineering and science disciplines. Students with majors in other science and engineering disciplines, and students with a mathematics major should take Math 2270 (Linear Algebra) and Math 2280 (Differential Equations) instead of Math 2250.
Prerequisites: MATH 2210


MATH 2270 Linear Algebra
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Linear algebra is a study of systems of linear equations, matrices, vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and inner product spaces. This class is required for students majoring in mathematics and many areas of science and engineering.
Prerequisites: MATH 1210


MATH 2280 Differential Equations
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This is a course which covers methods of solving ordinary differential equations. The class is designed to meet the needs of math, engineering, and certain science majors. Included in the class are techniques for finding solutions to linear and nonlinear first-order differential equations as well as higher-order linear equations with constant and variable coefficients. Laplace transforms, power series solutions, numerical methods along with systems of linear first-order differential equations are also addressed. Some mathematical modeling of differential equations is included.
Prerequisites: Math 2210 (can be taken concurrently)


MATH 2906 In-depth Investigations in Mathematics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to give students an in-depth learning experience in a mathematics related topic. It may include reading assignments, computation (by hand and/or with a calculator/computer), meetings, group discussions, group work, and excursions to pertinent sites.
Prerequisites: May vary with topic. Instructor


MATH 3040 Statistics for Scientists and Engineers
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This is a first course in statistics for STEM majors. Topics will include probability, discrete and continuous distributions, descriptive statistics, and statistical inference (confidence intervals and hypothesis testing, including linear regression and one-way ANOVA). Proficiency with integral calculus is required.
Prerequisites: MATH 1210


MATH 3310 Discrete Mathematics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course in discrete mathematics covers Boolean algebra, sets and relations, functions, induction, recursion, enumerative combinatorics, elements of number theory, complexity of algorithms, trees, and graph theory. A
Prerequisites: Math 1210


MTT 0715 Applied Basic Technical Math
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is designed to give basic math skills, if needed, in preparation for Applied Technical Math or Principles of Technology. The student will study basic math principles used in the CTE division classes. This includes addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Also included is the application of precision and accuracy in problem solving as well as a study of the metric measuring system. Problem solving techniques are discussed along with percentages and averages.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


MTT 1000 Survey of Machine Tool
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: This is an introductory course for those interested in the world of manufacturing. It emphasizes the machine tool field and includes hands-on activities with metal cutting lathes and milling machines.


MTT 1007 Principles of Technology I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This applied physics course covers scientific concepts of force, work, rate, resistance, energy, power, transformers, and mathematic computations necessary to perform experiments involving momentum as applied to mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems found in modern industry. Laboratory activities featuring measurement and instrumentation are emphasized.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


MTT 1008 Principles of Technology II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This applied physics course covers mathematic computations necessary to perform experiments involving scientific concepts of vibrations, energy, conversion, transducers, radiation, light, and time constants as applied to mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems found in modern industry. Laboratory activities featuring measurement and instrumentation are emphasized.
Prerequisites: MTT 1007
Corequisites: N/A


MTT 1060 Industrial Print Reading
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course is an introduction to reading and interpreting working drawings and prints for industrial processes and associated trades. Students will receive basic information on blueprints and written documents commonly found in industrial environments. The course is designed to allow the student to develop an understanding of the use of prints and an ability to read and interpret prints found in industrial settings.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


MTT 1110 Intro to Precision Machining
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is for first semester students. It teaches the manufacturing of metal parts using machine tool operations. Students learn the theoretical operations of the engine lathe, drill press, pedestal grinder, and vertical milling machine. The course includes lecture, discussion, and demonstrations.
Corequisites: MTT 1125


MTT 1125 Intro to Precision Machining Lab
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:0:15)

Description: This is a lab course for first semester students. It teaches the manufacturing of metal parts using machine tool operations and covers hands-on operations of the engine lathe, drill press, pedestal grinder, and vertical milling machine. Students practice all common operations done on a metal cutting lathe and are introduced to the basic operation of the vertical milling machine. The course includes demonstrations, practical applications, and labs. Those that complete the course should have entry skills for the machine tool industry.
Corequisites: MTT 1110


MTT 1210 Intermediate Precision Machining
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is for second semester students. It covers advanced machining principles dealing with threads, gear cutting, computer numeric control (CNC), basic metallurgy tool building and design, and includes operation theory of band machines, shapers, grinders, and turret lathes. Students improve skills on engine lathes and vertical milling machines.
Prerequisites: MTT 1125, MTT 1110
Corequisites: MTT 1225


MTT 1225 Intermediate Precision Machining Lab
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:0:15)

Description: This lab course is for second semester students. It teaches advanced operation of vertical milling machines and introduces operation of horizontal milling machines, grinders, shapers, and turret lathes. The course includes the combining of machine operations for the manufacturing of products and teaches on-call response to customer job demand.
Prerequisites: MTT 1125, MTT 1110
Corequisites: MTT 1210


MTT 1350 Related Machine Shop Practice
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:6)

Description: This course is for students with majors other than Machine Tool Technology. It presents general information and covers only basic machine tool operation, principally on the engine lathe. The course includes turning, boring, drill bit sharpening, tool bit grinding, taper cutting, facing, hole formation, threading (both internal and external), and simple tool design.


MTT 1999 Cooperative Education Experience
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in the classroom to actual job experience. Classroom instruction must precede the job experience or the student must be registered for courses at the same time the student is enrolled in the work experience.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Corequisites: N/A


MTT 2330 Introduction to Computer Numerical Control
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is for students seeking careers in CNC programming and operation. It introduces programming techniques such as conversational, G and M Code, and Dyna. Students learn about CAM software and how to generate code for CAM machines. Successful completers should be able to generate a process plan, a tool list, and a working program to produce the part from a print.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: MTT 2335


MTT 2335 Introduction to Computer Numerical Control Lab
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:0:15)

Description: This lab is for students seeking careers in CNC programming and operation. It introduces programming techniques such as conversational, G and M Code, and Dyna. Students learn about CAM software and how to generate code for CAM machines. Successful completers should be able to generate a process plan, a tool list, and a working program to produce the part from a print.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: MTT 2330


MTT 2430 Computer Numerical Control Operations
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is for second-year students who want to enhance their programming and operating skills.; It reviews different manufacturing materials and cutting processes. Students learn about industrial computer-aided machining (CAM) software and the process of compute-aided manufacturing.; It emphasizes fixturing and basic machine setups.
Prerequisites: MTT 2330 and MTT 2335
Corequisites: MTT 2435


MTT 2435 Computer Numerical Control Operations Lab
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:0:15)

Description: This course is for second-year students who want to enhance their programming and operating skills.; It reviews different manufacturing materials and cutting processes. Students learn about industrial computer-aided machining (CAM) software and the process of computer-aided manufacturing.; It emphasizes fixturing and basic machine setups.
Prerequisites: MTT 2330 and MTT 2335
Corequisites: MTT 2430


MTT 2716 Machine Tool Mathematics/Measurement
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course consists of the practical application of the concepts learned in AT 1715. Students will apply mathematic, geometric, and trigonometric concepts to projects in the laboratory environment. Hands-on, practical exercises are the foundation of this course.
Prerequisites: AT 1715


MUSC 1001 Summer Music Workshop
Semester(s) Taught: Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:1-2)

Description: This class provides visiting summer school students with opportunites to improve their individual musical performance. Credit is variable, depending on workshop length and instructional hours. Enrollment in this class is by permission of the instructor only. Participants must have successfully completed their sophomore year of high school. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 1006 Concert Attendance
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This course provides a means to document concert attendance by students majoring in music. This course is repeatable for credit.


MUSC 1010 Introduction to Music
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: A general appreciation course designed to make music meaningful to the average listener. The relationship of rhythm, melody, harmony, and form will be demonstrated though selected recordings. The elements of music will be treated non-technically together with historical and biographical observations. Western art music will be discussed as well as music of other world cultures. Also, a general survey of folk and popular music will be provided.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


MUSC 1030 Intro to Jazz and American Pop
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This course is a general music appreciation class designed to empower music listeners by giving them an understanding of American jazz and popular music. Students will develop analytical and listening skills that help them to identify and be able to seek and write about about jazz and popular music styles. This course fulfills the General Education requirement for Fine Arts.


MUSC 1031 History of Rock and Roll
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This course provides students with an overview of the history of rock and roll music from its roots to the present day. Emphasis is placed on major stylistic trends and the artists who made major contributions to the evolution of this musical genre. Rock music will also be studied in a sociological context- both as an influence on, and as a reflection of the society in which it has operated. Fundamental musical concepts and vocabulary will also be addressed.


MUSC 1036 Select Choir
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:4:0)

Description: This course provides group training in a variety of serious literature written for smaller vocal ensembles. Students enrolling in this course are expected to participate in major music events within the department. The group is auditioned from the A Cappella Choir. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By instructor's permission
Corequisites: A Cappella Choir (MUSC 1166/2166)


MUSC 1050 Group Piano I for Non-Majors
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:0)

Description: This is a course for non-music majors who desire to learn to play the piano. Students will learn to read basic music notation and to play simple pieces of music at the piano. (Additional fee required)


MUSC 1060 Group Piano II for Non-Majors
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:0)

Description: This is a course for non-music majors who desire to learn to play the piano. Students will learn to read basic music notation and to play simple pieces of music at the piano. This course will address intermediate level repertoire. (Additional fee required)


MUSC 1080 Class Voice
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to the study and performance of vocal music. It is designed for the beginning to intermediate singer, who desires to learn more about vocal music, including technique, diction and performance practices.


MUSC 1085 Piano Seminar
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is primarily a performance class in which the students learn how to perform and gain insights into musical works through performing experiences.Piano-related topics will be presented through lectures and discussions.This course is required for all piano majors.; Piano minors are encouraged to take it.


MUSC 1096 Symphony Orchestra - 1st Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: The course provides training and practical playing experience in a wide range of works for orchestra. Concerts and special programs are given throughout the year in which the students will be expected to participate. Audition required. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By audition and with permission of instructor


MUSC 1100 Fundamentals of Music
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course includes the study of the rudimentary materials of music: scales, intervals, keys, rhythms, meters, and terminology for both visual and aural perception. It is designed for non-music majors, elementary education majors, and music majors desiring further foundational understanding prior to enrolling in the music theory sequence.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


MUSC 1106 Chamber Orchestra - 1st Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: The course provides training and practical playing experience in a wide range of works for orchestra. Concerts and special programs are given throughout the year in which the students will be expected to participate. Audition required. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By audition and with permission of instructor


MUSC 1110 Music Theory I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course includes the study of the fundamental elements of music. Content will focus on part writing, composition, and analysis. This course is required of all music-majors and minors and is recommended for serious students of voice, piano or other instruments. This course must be taken in sequence, and concurrently with MUSC 1130. During the first week of class, a placement exam will be administered - - a score of 70% or better must be achieved on this exam, or the student will be placed in MUSC 1100 Fundamentals of Music. If students receive a score of 4 or higher on their high school Advance Placement (AP) Music Theory exam, they may choose to waive this course.
Prerequisites: Students must pass a placement examination that is administered the first week of class with a 70% or higher to continue in this course. Students who do not pass will be placed in MUSC 1100 for remediation.
Corequisites: MUSC 1130


MUSC 1116 Symphonic Band I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: Students will perform concert band music selected by the instructor with technical accuracy and expressive musicality. Membership is open without audition. This course provides students with GE credit in the Fine Arts area.


MUSC 1120 Music Theory II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is the second semester of the music theory series, continuing the study of the fundamental elements of music. Content will focus on part writing, composition, improvisation and analysis. It is required of all music-majors and minors and is recommended for serious students of voice, piano, or other instruments. This course must be taken in sequence and concurrently with MUSC 1140.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1110
Corequisites: MUSC 1140


MUSC 1126 Badger Pep Band I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:0)

Description: Students in this course perform in support of Snow College athletic events.


MUSC 1130 Sight Singing/Ear Training I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This course will introduce students to the process of sight singing and musical dictation. The course will promote the development of each student's ability to sing music at sight, notate melodies and rhythms as dictated, improvise, and identify and notate choral harmonies as dictated. This course must be taken concurrently with MUSC 1110. Required of music majors.
Prerequisites: Students must complete the Snow College Music Department Music Theory Placement Examination.
Corequisites: MUSC 1110.


MUSC 1136 Wind Ensemble
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:4:0)

Description: In this course students study serious wind ensemble literature. Concerts are given each semester. Audition required.; This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor


MUSC 1140 Sight Sing/Ear Training II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: Catalog Description: This course will promote the development of each student's ability to sing music at sight, notate melodies and rhythms as dictated, identify and notate choral harmonies as dictated. Students are also given the opportunity to improvise. This course must be taken concurrently with MUSC 1120. Required of music majors.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1110 (Music Theory I), MUSC 1130 (Sight Sing/Ear Training I)
Corequisites: MUSC 1120 (Music Theory II)


MUSC 1146 Jazz Ensemble, First Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: A standard jazz big band. Audition required. Performs literature inclusive of all jazz styles. Performs concerts, attends festivals and does touring. This class also covers various aspects of the music business such as creating promotional materials and marketing, identifying technological resources for jazz education, and networking strategies to secure employment. This course may be repeated for credit.; (Repeatable for Credit)
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


MUSC 1150 Class Piano I (Repeatable for Credit)
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This is the first semester of a four semester sequential music major course designed to help students meet the music major piano proficiency requirement. Class Piano I introduces students to basic piano skills. This course also introduces the concept of musical improvisation. All music majors must take a piano assessment prior to enrolling in Class Piano. Students will be placed in the appropriate semester of Class Piano after completing the initial assessment. (Additional fee required) 
Prerequisites: piano placement testing required
Corequisites: None


MUSC 1156 Community Chorus
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: The Community Chorus prepares and performs choral masterworks, including the annual Snow College production of Handel's Messiah, along with additional concerts during the year. May be repeated for credit.


MUSC 1160 Class Piano II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is the second in a sequence of four class piano courses for music majors. It teaches fundamentals of piano technique and prepares music majors to progress toward piano proficiency. Students must complete MUSC 1150 Class Piano I or test into this course (see a Music department advisor).
Prerequisites: MUSC 1150 or instructor approval
Corequisites: None


MUSC 1166 A Cappella Choir, First Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:3:0)

Description: Group training in a variety of choral music literature. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department. No preliminary audition required, but each student will be given a placement audition during the semester. This course may be repeated for credit. (Additional fee required)


MUSC 1186 String Chamber Music
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is intended for small chamber music ensembles comprised of capable string and piano players. It will include primarily trios, quartets, and sonates. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Approval of instructor or Director of Orchestras required


MUSC 1196 Brass Chamber Music
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: In this course students participate in a group ensemble experience on brass instruments. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: By permission of instructor only


MUSC 1200 Introduction to Music technology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: Students in this course are introduced to computer technology, and audio hardware and their application to music. The course includes instruction in music notation, MIDI sequencing, digital recording, and live sound applications. The course also includes an introduction to computer aided music education software programs.


MUSC 1206 Woodwind Chamber, First Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Chamber ensemble groups for woodwind players. Available to music majors and non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and small-ensemble performance skills. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


MUSC 1226 Advanced Women Chorus, Year One
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course provides group training in a variety of musical styles arranged for women's chorus. Enrollment in this course is by audition. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department. This course is repeatable for credit.;


MUSC 1336 Percussion Ensemble
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Students will gain ensemble experience on a variety of percussion instruments. Students will learn the standard percussion ensemble literature from the contemporary era. In addition, students will be taught correct sticking and hand techniques on a variety of percussion instruments. This course is open to all students.


MUSC 1406 Jazz Chamber Music, First Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Chamber ensemble groups for jazz musicians. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Registration by permission of instructor. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Audition required.
Corequisites: N/A


MUSC 1480 Brass Instrument Study and Pedagogy I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is the first in a sequence of two courses designed to teach music education majors the fundamentals of how to play and teach brass instruments. It is taught every other year, alternating with MUSC 1840 and 1850. This course and its follow up, MUSC 1490, are required for instrumental music education majors. Vocal music education majors are required to take only one semester and may enroll in either MUSC 1480 or MUSC 1490. All four-year instrumental music education programs require a full year of this course or its equivalent


MUSC 1490 Brass Instrument Study and Pedagogy II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course is the second semester of a two course sequence that teaches music education majors the fundamentals of playing and teaching brass instruments. This course is required for instrumental music education majors. All four-year instrumental music education programs require a full-year of this course or its equivalent. Similar courses are taught at other Utah colleges that offer degrees in music education.


MUSC 1556 Private Guitar I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual guitar instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops a student?s technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical and improvisational skills as well as developing a student?s understanding of the history and repertory of the guitar.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


MUSC 1566 Private Organ 1st Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5-1:1-2)

Description: This course provides students with individual organ instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops a student’s technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical and improvisational skills as well as developing a student’s understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course.An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 1576 Class Guitar
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides group instruction in the fundamentals of guitar. Students will learn basic chords, strumming and fingerpicking patterns, standard notation and tabliture ($70.00 fee). Repeatable for credit.


MUSC 1595 Private Piano Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5-1:1-2)

Description: This course provides students with individual piano instruction and is repeatable one time for credit. This course develops a student's technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical and improvisational skills while increasing his/her understanding of the history and repertory of the piano. The course is open to all non-Music Majors and for music students hoping to focus primarily on piano technique.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


MUSC 1596 Private Piano I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual piano instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops a student's technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical and improvisational skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. An additional fee is required.


MUSC 1616 Private Voice I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual vocal instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops a students technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical and improvisational skills as well as developing a student’s understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Formerly MUSC 161R. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


MUSC 1626 Private Woodwinds I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual woodwind instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops a student's technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical and improvisational skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


MUSC 1656 Private Brass I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual brass instruction. Private instruction is required for music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive 1 hour private lessons, and non-majors receive 1/2 hour private lessons. This course develops a student's technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical, and improvisational skills. Students also learn about their instrument in the context of history and repertoire. A jury is required at the end of the semester for students enrolled in 1 hour private lessons.


MUSC 1686 Private Percussion I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual percussion instruction. Private Instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops a student?s technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical and improvisational skills as well as developing a student?s understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. An additional fee is required.


MUSC 1700 Introduction to Music Education
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to teaching music as a profession. It includes on site observations of public school music programs.


MUSC 1736 Private Strings I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction. Private instruction is required of all music majors each semester. Music performance majors are required to take 60-minute lessons each week, while music education and music therapy students are required to take 30-minute lessons each week. All students are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is also available to non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and performance skills. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


MUSC 1750 Woodwind Methods and Pedagogy I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course teaches the fundamentals of playing and teaching flute and double reed instruments in the woodwind family. This is a required course for music education majors.


MUSC 1760 Woodwind Methods and Pedagogy II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course teaches the fundamentals of playing and teaching the single reed instruments of the woodwind family. It is optional, but strongly encouraged, as it satisfies the instrumental music education major's requirements at most four-year institutions.


MUSC 1800 Percussion Methods and Pedagogy I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course teaches students the fundamentals of playing all of the instruments in the percussion family. It will be taught every other year, alternating with MUSC 1700. It is optional but strongly encouraged, as it satisfies the instrumental music education major's similar requirements at transfer institutions.


MUSC 1850 String Workshop and Pedagogy II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: Building on skills acquired in the prerequisite course, MUSC 1840, this course focuses on more advanced playing techniques of stringed instruments including violin, viola, cello, and string bass. The course will be taught every other year alternating with Brass Pedagogy. This course is required for instrumental music majors.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1840 or permission of instructor


MUSC 1856 Private Jazz I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5:1)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction in jazz at the beginning level. This course augments but does not replace private study on the major instrument, and can not be taken in the place of private lessons. All students taking this course are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is also available to non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and performance skills. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


MUSC 1901 Performing Arts Career Exploration
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course provides students the opportunity to explore careers in music. The course is project-based; students will propose and complete projects designed to show their research into areas of occupational interest to them, and present these research projects to class members. This course transfers as music elective credit to 4-year schools.


MUSC 1902 Creating Music with a Smartphone/Tablet
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This course is open to any Snow College student on the Ephraim campus. Students will learn how to create music using a smartphone or tablet computer. In order to participate in the course, students must own a smartphone or tablet computer, and be prepared to download 10 applications from app stores.


MUSC 1920 Opera Workshop
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course includes staging and performances of arias and short scenes from operas, operettas, and musical theater. It is intended for vocal music performance majors, as well as those wishing for an advanced experience in vocal literature.; (Repeatable for Credit)


MUSC 1976 Chamber Vocal Ensemble
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: This course provides group training in a variety of literature written for very small vocal ensembles. Students enrolling in this course are expected to participate in major activities of the department. The group is auditioned from the A Cappella Choir. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 2006 Concert Attendance, Second Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:1)

Description: This course provides students with the opportunity to watch other students, faculty and visiting artists in concert performance. Students learn elements of technique, stage deportment and stylistic interpretation by watching other performers. This course meets the concert attendance requirement of the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) and is required concert attendance for all music majors.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1006


MUSC 2036 Cadence Chamber Choir
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-4:0)

Description: This course provides group training in a variety of serious literature written for smaller vocal ensembles. Students enrolling in this course are expected to participate in major music events within the department. The group is auditioned from the student body. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By audition with instructor permission


MUSC 2050 Vocal Pedagogy
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course is designed to teach those majoring in music how to sing and how to teach others to sing using correct principles and techniques. It is intended for both instrumental and vocal music majors. This course transfers as part of a music major to other institutions in Utah.


MUSC 2085 Piano Seminar
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is primarily a performance class in which the students learn how to perform and gain insights into musical works through performing experiences.Piano-related topics will be presented through lectures and discussions. This course is required for all piano majors.; Piano minors are encouraged to take it. May be repeated for credit.


MUSC 2090 Piano Literature I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: Students will study the piano solo repertoire from the Baroque and Classical eras, and learn the stylistic features and performance practices of these periods through reading, listening, and practical performing experiences. This course is taught in alternating years, and is a requirement for all piano majors.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


MUSC 2095 Piano Literature II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: Students will study the piano solo repertoire from the Romantic and Contemporary eras, and learn the stylistic features and performance practices of these periods through reading, listening, and practical performing experiences. This course is taught in alternating years, and is a requirement for all piano majors.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


MUSC 2096 Symphony Orchestra 2nd Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: The course provides training and practical playing experience in a wide range of works for orchestra. Concerts and special programs are given throughout the year in which the students will be expected to participate. Audition required. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By audition and with permission of instructor.


MUSC 2106 Chamber Orchestra 2nd Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:2)

Description: The course provides training and practical playing experience in a wide range of works for chamber orchestra. Concerts and special programs are given throughout the year in which the students will be required to participate. This is a select, auditioned group. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: by audition


MUSC 2110 Music Theory III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is a continuation of Basic Music Theory. Includes chromatic harmony, composition, improvisation and analysis.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1120 with a grade of C or better
Corequisites: MUSC 2130


MUSC 2116 Symphonic Band
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course includes the study, rehearsal, and concert perfomances of standard band literature. No audition is required to register for this ensemble. (Repeatable for Credit)
Corequisites: MUSC 2126


MUSC 2120 Music Theory IV
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is a continuation of Basic Music Theory, including 19th Century chromatic harmony, composition, analysis and 20th Century harmonic practices. Prerequisite: completion of MUSC 2110 with a grade of C or better. Must be concurrently enrolled in MUSC 2140.
Prerequisites: MUSC 2110 with grade of C or better
Corequisites: MUSC 2140


MUSC 2126 Badger Pep Band II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This course involves participation in ensemble performances supporting Snow College athletic events. This course is repeatable for credit.


MUSC 2130 Sight Sing/Ear Training III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course is required of music majors. Students develop and improve the ability to sing music at sight, notate melodies and rhythms as dictated, identify and notate chordal harmonies as dictated, improve keyboard skills, and improvise music. This course must be taken in sequence with other sight singing/ear training courses, and concurrently with MUSC 2110.
Prerequisites: Completion of MUSC 1140 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor
Corequisites: MUSC 2110


MUSC 2136 Wind Ensemble
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: This course includes a study of serious wind ensemble literature. Concerts are performed each semester as part of the course. An audition is required. (Repeatable for Credit)
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor


MUSC 2140 Sight Sing/Ear Training IV
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course is required of music majors. Students develop and improve the ability to sing music at sight, notate melodies and rhythms as dictated, identify and notate chordal harmonies as dictated, improve keyboard skills, and improvise music. This course must be taken in sequence, and concurrently with MUSC 2120.
Prerequisites: Completion of MUSC 2130 with a grade of C-
Corequisites: MUSC 2120


MUSC 2146 Jazz Ensemble
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: Jazz Ensemble is a standard jazz big band. The jazz ensemble will perform literature inclusive of all jazz styles. The group will perform concerts, attend festivals, and tour. This course also covers various aspects of the music business such as creating promotional material and marketing, identifying technological resources for jazz education, and creating networking strategies to secure employment. An audition is required to participate in this course. This course is repeatable for credit.


MUSC 2150 Class Piano III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This is a music major course which teaches the fundamentals of piano playing at an intermediate level. This course will provide students with intermediate level piano techniques, rhythms, music notation, and intermediate performance pieces.


MUSC 2156 Community Chorus
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:3:0)

Description: The Community Chorus prepares and performs choral masterworks, including the annual Snow College production of Handel's Messiah, along with additional concerts during the year. Course is repeatable for credit.


MUSC 2160 Class Piano IV
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course completes the Class Piano sequence for music majors and culminates with the piano proficiency exam. This course also reinforces basic concepts of musical improvisation. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: MUSIC 1150, MUSC 1160, MUSC 2150 or instructor approval


MUSC 2166 A Cappella Choir
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course will provide group training in a variety of choral music literature. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department. All students will be auditioned in order to participate in the choir. (Repeatable for Credit) (Additional fee required)


MUSC 2186 String Chamber Music 2nd Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course provides training and practical playing experience for chamber music groups. It is designed for capable string and piano players. Students will learn string and piano literature including quartets, trios, sonatas, etc. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By permission of instructor.


MUSC 2196 Brass Chamber Music II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Students in this course participate in a chamber music experience on brass instruments. Students will be organized into quartets, quintets, and choirs. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By permission of the instructor.


MUSC 2206 Woodwind Chamber Music II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course provides students with training and practical playing experience in chamber music groups. It is designed for woodwind players and is available to both music majors and non-music majors. Students will learn and perform chamber literature including quintets, quartets, and trios. This course is repeatable for credit.


MUSC 2226 Advanced Women Chorus, Year Two
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:3:0)

Description: This course will provide group training in a variety of music literature appropriate for women's chorus. Enrollment in this course is by audition. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department. This course is repeatable for credit.


MUSC 2336 Percussion Ensemble
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Students will gain experience performing in a percussion ensemble. This course is open to all percussionists.


MUSC 2350 Beginning Conducting
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: The fundamentals of baton technique are addressed, as well as the basics of score preparation. Students will be introduced to the application of theoretical formal and historical knowledge to the process of conducting and musical problem solving.


MUSC 2406 Jazz Chamber Music, Second Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Chamber ensemble groups for jazz musicians. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Registration by permission of instructor. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1406 or permission of Instructor. Audition required.
Corequisites: N/A


MUSC 2556 Private Guitar II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual guitar instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester in college. This course is repeatable for credit. This course is available to non music majors subject to the instructor's availability. Music majors should enroll in 1 hour private lessons, and non-music majors should enroll in 1/2 hour private lessons.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of the second term MUSC 1556 end of semester jury.


MUSC 2566 Private Organ, Second Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5-1:1-2)

Description: This course provides students with individual organ instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student’s technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical, and improvisational skills as well as developing a student’s understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 1000 level private instruction in order to register for 2000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 2576 Class Guitar: Intermediate
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with instruction in the fundamentals of guitar beyond the beginner level. Students will learn to construct basic chords, and focus on strumming and fingerpicking patterns. Students will be expected to learn both standard notation and tabliture. Course fee.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1576, or instructor's permission.


MUSC 2596 Private Piano II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual piano instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student's technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical, and improvisational skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 1000 level private instruction in order to register for 2000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1596 or permission of instructor


MUSC 2616 Private Voice II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual vocal instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student's technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical, and improvisational skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 1000 level private instruction in order to register for 2000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1616 or consent of instructor


MUSC 2626 Private Woodwinds II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Private Woodwind II continues the instruction received in Private Woodwind I. Students receive individualized instruction in how to play the woodwind instruments. Students will develop proper technique and perform appropriate literature.
Prerequisites: Private Woodwind I and permission of the instructor


MUSC 2656 Private Brass II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual brass instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical, and improvisational skills as well as developing understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 1000 level private instruction in order to register for 2000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.


MUSC 2686 Private Percussion II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual percussion instruction. Private instruction required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical, and improvisational skills as well as developing understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 1000 level private instruction in order to register for 2000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.


MUSC 2706 Musical Theater Production
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: This course provides credit for participation in college musical theater productions as a member of the chorus, or pit orchestra. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: By permission of instructor


MUSC 2736 Private Strings II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction at an intermediate to advanced level. Private instruction is required of all music majors each semester. Music performance majors are required to take 60-minute lessons each week, while music education and music therapy students are required to take 30-minute lessons each week. All students are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is also available, by instructor's permission, to non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and performance skills. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: MUSC 1736 or consent of instructor


MUSC 2850 Special Topics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to address a special topic associated with the discipline that may not be included as a part of the normal curriculum. Topics may be extensions of current field of study or it may include possible future additions to the departmental curriculum.


MUSC 2856 Private Jazz II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5:1)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction in jazz at the beginning to intermediate level. This course augments but does not replace private study on the major instrument, and can not be taken in the place of private lessons. All students taking this course are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is also available to non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and performance skills. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


MUSC 2976 Chamber Vocal Ensemble, Second Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course will provide small group training in a variety of choral music literature. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department.This course is open only to music majors pursuing the B. Mus degree or by permission of instructor.Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Admittance into B. MUS program or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 3030 Jazz and Popular Music I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This is the first course in a two-semester sequence. This course chronologically introduces musical components of jazz and popular music and the contributions of its major artists. Jazz styles to be studied include blues, ragtime, and New Orleans Jazz. Popular music styles to be studied include parlor songs, spirituals, and Tin Pan Alley. This course chronologically introduces musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Students will further develop listening skills that help them identify and intelligently talk about jazz styles.
Prerequisites: Admission into the Bachelor of Music degree program.


MUSC 3031 Jazz and Popular Music History II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This is the second course in a two-semester sequence. This course continues the chronology and concepts started in Jazz and Popular Music History I. Jazz styles to be studied include swing, bebop, cool, and fusion. Popular music styles to be studied include rock and roll, world music, new age music, rap, hip-hop and others. Students will further develop listening skills that help them identify and intelligently talk about jazz and popular music styles.
Prerequisites: MUSC 2120


MUSC 3036 Cadence Chamber Choir
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:4:0)

Description: A small ensemble open to advanced choral musicians. Available only to music majors who are pursuing the bachelor of music degree or by permission of instructor. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: By instructor's permission, audition required


MUSC 3096 Symphony Orchestra - 3rd Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: The course provides training and practical playing experience in a wide range of works for orchestra. Concerts and special programs are given throughout the year in which the students will be expected to participate. Audition required. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By audition and with permission of instructor


MUSC 3106 Chamber Orchestra - 3rd Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: The course provides training and practical playing experience in a wide range of works for orchestra. Concerts and special programs are given throughout the year in which the students will be expected to participate. Audition required. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By audition and with permission of instructor


MUSC 3126 Badger Pep Band III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course involves participation in ensemble performances supporting Snow College athletic events. This course is repeatable for credit.
Corequisites: MUSC 2116


MUSC 3136 Wind Ensemble III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:4:0)

Description: This course includes a study of serious wind ensemble literature. Concerts are performed each semester as part of the course. An audition is required. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor


MUSC 3140 Sight Sing/Ear Training IV
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course is required of music majors. Students develop the ability to sing music at sight, notate melodies and rhythms as dictated, and indentify and notate chordal harmonies as dictated. This course must be taken in sequence, and concurrently with MUSC 3120.
Prerequisites: Completion of MUSC 2130 with a grade of C
Corequisites: MUSC 3120


MUSC 3146 Jazz Ensemble III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:4:0)

Description: Jazz Ensemble is a standard jazz big band. The jazz ensemble will perform literature inclusive of all jazz styles. Historical context and professional level expectations will be addressed, including but not limited to the responsibilities of each chair, showing leadership or doubling on other instruments (typical of the saxophone section). This course is open only to music majors pursuing the B. Mus degree or by permission of instructor. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Admittance into B. MUS program, MUSC 3146 or permission of instructor. Audition required. or permission of instructor. Audition required.
Corequisites: May be required to take Jazz Improvisation at the discretion of the Instructor.


MUSC 3150 Choral Pedagogy and Methods
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to teach those pursuing a bachelors degree in vocal performance how to sing and how to teach others to sing using correct principles and techniques. It is open to all who have been admitted to the B. Mus. Program, but is required for those completing the vocal performance track.
Prerequisites: Admission to B. Music program or permission of instructor.


MUSC 3156 Master Chorale (Community Chorus) III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: Group training in a variety of choral music literature. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department. No preliminary audition required, but each student will be given a placement audition during the semester. This course may be repeated for credit.


MUSC 3160 Instrumental Pedagogy and Methods
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course focuses on fundamental principles and specific techniques of music teaching. Students will reinforce, acquire and apply principles, techniques, methods, and philosophies of instrumental music performance. Required for instrumental performance majors.
Prerequisites: MUSC 2120


MUSC 3166 A Cappella Choir III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:3:0)

Description: This course will provide group training in a variety of choral music literature. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department. All students will be auditioned in order to participate in the choir. (Repeatable for Credit) (Additional fee required)


MUSC 3170 Elementary Music Methods
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course teaches best practice methods for teaching music in K-6 schools. The curriculum focuses on outcomes delineated in the National Standards for Music Education, and the Utah State Board of Education Standards for Music Education. This course is required for students completing the Snow College/Weber State University music education licensure program.
Prerequisites: MUSC 2120


MUSC 3186 String Chamber Music - 3rd Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is intended for small chamber ensembles comprised of capable string and piano players. It will include primarily trios, quartets, and sonates. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: By permission of instructor


MUSC 3196 Brass Chamber Music
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: In this course students participate in a group ensemble experience on brass instruments. It is designed for capable brass players. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: By permission of instructor only


MUSC 3206 Woodwind Chamber III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Chamber ensemble groups for woodwind players. Available to music majors or non music majors, who wish to develop their musicianship and small ensemble performance skills. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: By permission of instructor
Corequisites: None


MUSC 3226 Women's Chorale III
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:3:0)

Description: This course provides group training in a variety of serious literature written for smaller vocal ensembles. Students enrolling in this course are expected to participate in major music events within the department. The group is auditioned from the student body. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By audition with instructor permission


MUSC 3250 Contemporary Vocal Styles
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is an elective in the Bachelor of Music degree in Commercial Music. It is designed to give vocalists the opportunity to learn about a wide variety of vocal techniques, including contemporary commercial music, belting, country and rock styles. It will focus on the technique and physiology of these styles.
Prerequisites: Completion of MUSC 2120 and 2140 with a grade of C or better OR permission of instructor.


MUSC 3306 Jazz Improvisation I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is the first in a two semester sequence designed to teach musicians the basics of jazz improvisation, especially with regards to the performance and understanding of historical jazz vocabulary, chord/scale relationships, rhythmic interaction within the ensemble, stylistic concepts of melodic interpretation, and the rhythmic invention of scales. Exercises will include performing required scales in a variety of rhythms, performing major and minor ii-V-I jazz vocabulary licks in all twelve keys, performing required jazz standards by memory, and transcribing and performing several historical jazz solos, written out and memorized. This course is required for instrumental performance majors in the Bachelor of Music in Commercial Music degree program.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


MUSC 3307 Jazz Improvisation III
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This is the second course in a two-semester sequence. This course continues concepts started in Jazz Improvisation I. Students will improve their ability to understand the nuances of improvising in varied genres and styles, guided by historical precedence. Exercises will include performing required scales in a variety of rhythms, performing major and minor ii-V-I jazz vocabulary licks in all twelve keys, performing required jazz standards by memory, and transcribing examples of historic jazz solos representing the genres and styles discussed.
Prerequisites: Completion of 3306 or permission of instructor


MUSC 3336 Percussion Ensemble III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Students will gain ensemble experience on a variety of percussion instruments. Available only to music majors who are pursuing the B. Mus. degree or by permission of instructor. Audition required. This course my be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor Required.
Corequisites: None


MUSC 3350 Music Technology I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to computer technology and how it is used in music, music education, and audio production. It focusses on developing skills in music notation programs, Digital Audio Workstations (DAWs), and music education software. It is the first of two courses focused to help students develop knowledge and skills of computer hardware and software that assist in content creation, multimedia production, and music instruction.
Corequisites: Suggested Corequisite MUSC 4440 Audio Fundamentals


MUSC 3352 Music Technology II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course builds upon the foundations covered in MUSC 3350 Music Technology I, by developing more advanced skills in music notation programs and Digital Audio Workstations (DAWs), as well as introducing other multimedia tools such as video editing and graphic design software. It is the second of two courses focused to help students develop knowledge and skills of computer hardware and software that assist in content creation, multimedia production, and music instruction.
Corequisites: Suggested Corequisite MUSC 4840 Live Sound Reinforcement


MUSC 3406 Jazz Chamber Music, III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: Chamber ensemble groups for jazz musicians. This course is for third year students. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Registration by permission of instructor. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 2406 or permission of Instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 3540 Music Form and Analysis
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Music Form and Analysis is an upper level course designed to provide students with a comprehensive background in the major compositional styles and forms of art music during the Baroque, Classical, and Romantic periods. The course is designed to aid students in the proper interpretation of musical lines and structures. An extensive focus will be placed on the study of musical scores and the development of aural skills in relation to these scores.
Prerequisites: MUSC 2120


MUSC 3556 Private Guitar III
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:0)

Description: This course provides students with private guitar instruction. Private instruction is required for music majors each semester. This course develops and improves a student's technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills. Private lessons at the 3000 and 4000 level are available only to students who have matriculated into the bachelor of music degree program.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of the 2000 level jury


MUSC 3560 Songwriting I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course teaches the fundamentals of the songwriting process. It is required for all students who are completing the Bachelor of Music with Emphasis in Commercial Music degree.
Prerequisites: MUSC 2120


MUSC 3566 Private Organ, Third Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5-1:1-2)

Description: This course provides students with individual organ instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student’s technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills as well as developing a student’s understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. The course promotes synthesis various types of musical knowledge. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 2000 level private instruction in order to register for 3000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 3570 Songwriting II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course continues with the concepts learned in MUSC 3560 (Songwriting I), and introduces the concept of writing on demand (jingles, TV, film, event music, etc.) Students will also work on creating an individual songwriting "voice." This class is required for all students completing the songwriting/composition advisement track of the bachelor of music degree.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3560


MUSC 3596 Private Piano III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual piano instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student's technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. The course promotes synthesis various types of musical knowledge. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 2000 level private instruction in order to register for 3000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 3616 Private Voice III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual vocal instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student's technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. The course promotes synthesis various types of musical knowledge. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 2000 level private instruction in order to register for 3000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of two semesters of MUSC 3616, or instructor's permission.


MUSC 3626 Private Woodwinds III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual woodwind instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student’s technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical, and improvisational skills as well as developing a student’s understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 1000 level private instruction in order to register for 2000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 3630 MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This is the first semester of a two semester sequence providing music majors with a foundational understanding in the history and development of Western art music. It will cover music throughout history and the relationship of music to the other arts. This course includes the chronological study of music during the Classical and Romantic periods.
Prerequisites: Music Theory II (MUSC 1130) and Expository Composition (ENGL 1010)


MUSC 3640 MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This is the second semester of a two semester sequence providing music majors with a foundational understanding in the history and development of Western art music. It will cover music throughout history and the relationship of music to the other arts. This course includes the chronological study of music in the Contemporary Period (Twentieth Century) and from Antiquity through the Baroque period. This is the continuation course to MUSC 3630.
Prerequisites: Music Theory II (MUSC 1130) and Expository Composition (ENGL 1010)


MUSC 3656 Private Brass III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual brass instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical, and improvisational skills, as well as developing understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 1000 level private instruction in order to register for 2000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 3686 Private Percussion III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual percussion instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves technical, interpretive, sight reading, pedagogical, and improvisational skills as well as developing understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 1000 level private instruction in order to register for 2000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 3696 Private Composition/Production III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction at an advanced level. Private instruction is required of all music majors each semester. Music performance majors are required to take 60-minute lessons each week, while music education and music therapy students are required to take 30-minute lessons each week. All students are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is also available to non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and performance skills. An additional fee is required. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of two semesters of MUSC 2696.


MUSC 3720 Audio Post Production
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:1)

Description: This course presents an overview of the technology and techniques used in the creation and production of audio synchronized with moving picture (video, film, and television). It includes a study of the history and technology of sound in film, elements of sound for video, and the various roles and uses of music with moving picture.
Prerequisites: MUSC 4440 Audio Fundamentals or MUSC 3352 Music Technology II or teacher approval


MUSC 3736 Private Strings III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction at an intermediate to advanced level. Private instruction is required of all music majors each semester. Music performance majors are required to take 60-minute lessons each week, while music education and music therapy students are required to take 30-minute lessons each week. All students are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries, which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is also available to non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and performance skills. An additional fee is required. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and successful completion of MUSC 2736.


MUSC 3750 Survey of Music Business
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:1)

Description: This course is a general overview and study of the business of making money from music. It covers the general aspects of the music industry including the major functional areas, governmental regulations, and revenue streams. It also presents a balanced focus towards discussing the practical career paths, common practices, and history of the music industry.


MUSC 3856 Private Jazz III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5:1)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction in jazz at the beginning to intermediate level. This course augments but does not replace private study on the major instrument, and can not be taken in the place of private lessons. All students taking this course are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is also available to non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and performance skills. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


MUSC 3856 Private Jazz, Third Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0.5:1)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction in jazz at the intermediate to advanced level. This course augments but does not replace private study on the major instrument, and can not be taken in the place of private lessons. All students taking this course are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is available only to students pursuing the Bachelor of Music degree in Commercial Music. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Corequisites: N/A


MUSC 3920 Opera Workshop
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course includes staging and performances of arias and short scenes from operas, operettas, and musical theater. It is intended for students in the vocal music advisement track, as well as those wishing for an advanced experience in vocal literature.This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. This course is open only to music majors pursuing the bachelor of music degree or by permission of instructor. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Admittance into bachelor of music program or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 3976 Chamber Vocal Ensemble, Third Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course will provide small group training in a variety of choral music literature. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department.This course is open only to music majors pursuing the B. Mus degree or by permission of instructor.Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Admittance into B. MUS program or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4001 Summer Music Workshop
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:1-2)

Description: This class is designed for visiting summer school students to help them improve their individual musical performance. Credit is variable, depending on workshop length and instructional hours. Enrollment in this class is by permission of the instructor only.Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 4036 Cadence Chamber Choir IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:4:0)

Description: This course provides group training in a variety of serious literature written for smaller vocal ensembles. Students enrolling in this course are expected to participate in major music events within the department. The group is auditioned from the student body. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3036 or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4096 Symphony Orchestra IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: The course provides training and practical playing experience in a wide range of works for orchestra. Concerts and special programs are given throughout the year in which the students will be expected to participate. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Audition required. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3096 or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4106 Chamber Orchestra IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: The course provides training and practical playing experience in a wide range of works for orchestra. Concerts and special programs are given throughout the year in which the students will be expected to participate. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Audition required. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3106 or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4110 Contemporary Keyboard Harmony
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course focuses on application of the skills learned in class piano to jazz and popular music. Assignments will focus on chording, improvisation, lead-sheet reading and writing sight reading and other keyboard skills for popular and jazz music genres. This course gives students the opportunity to continue to improve piano skills acquired during the proficiency process as well as adapting those skills to commercial music applications.
Prerequisites: MUSC 2160, Piano Proficiency or permission of instructor


MUSC 4126 Badger Pep Band IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course involves participation in ensemble performances supporting Snow College athletic events. This course is repeatable for credit.


MUSC 4130 Commercial Arranging
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course focuses on the practical application of composition skills learned in Music Theory I-IV. Emphasis will be placed on the creation of musical arrangements for a wide variety of instrumental and vocal ensembles. Topics of study will include the ranges and colors of instruments and voices and their idiomatic styles. Additional topics will include an emphasis on commercial arranging, alteration, and other forms of musical adaptation and their relation to copyright laws and licensing.
Prerequisites: Music Theory IV (MUSC 3120)


MUSC 4136 Wind Ensemble
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course includes a study of serious wind ensemble literature. Concerts are performed each semester as part of the course. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. An audition is required. This course is repeatable for credit.


MUSC 4140 Contemporary Orchestration
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course includes a study of the characteristics of woodwind, brass, percussion, and string instruments and the process of orchestrating for those instruments and their application to contemporary music. Assignments will focus on the practical application of orchestration for popular and jazz music genres.
Prerequisites: Music Theory IV (MUSC 3120)


MUSC 4146 Jazz Ensemble IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:4:0)

Description: Jazz Ensemble is a standard jazz big band. The jazz ensemble will perform literature inclusive of all jazz styles. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Addition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3146 or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4147 Commercial Music Ensemble
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:1)

Description: This course provides students with an ensemble experience that focuses on various commercial music genres. The group serves as a laboratory for performers, composers, and music technologists. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Students will function as ensemble leaders and in collaboration with other ensemble members. It is required during the final year of study for all students pursuing the Bachelor of Music degree in Commercial music.This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. This course may be repeated for credit.


MUSC 4150 Commercial Composition
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course focuses on the practical application of composition skills learned in Theory I-V to the area of commercial music. Additional topics will include the writing of music for TV/film and other visual media. Activities will include writing charts for class members and the performances of these works in class.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3120 (Music Theory IV)


MUSC 4156 Community Chorus, Fourth Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course will provide group training in a variety of choral music literature. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department.This course is open only to music majors pursuing the B. Mus degree. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3156 or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4166 A Cappella Choir IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:3:0)

Description: This course will provide group training in a variety of choral music literature. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Registration by permission of instructor. Audition required. May be repeated for credit. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: MUSC 3166 or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4176 Snow Men
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course will provide group training in a variety of choral music literature for men's voices. Those registering are expected to participate in major activities of the department. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Registration by permission of instructor. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3176 or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4186 String Chamber Music IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course provides training and practical playing experience for chamber music groups. It is designed for capable string and piano players. Students will learn string and piano literature including quartets, trios, sonatas, etc. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3186 or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4196 Brass Chamber Music IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: In this course students participate in a group ensemble experience on brass instruments. It is designed for capable brass players. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3196 or permission of instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4206 Woodwind Chamber Music IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: Chamber ensemble groups for woodwind players. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3206 or permission of instructor. Audition required.
Corequisites: None


MUSC 4226 Women's Chorale IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course provides group training in a variety of serious literature written for smaller vocal ensembles. Students enrolling in this course are expected to participate in major music events within the department. The group is auditioned from the student body. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: By audition with instructor permission


MUSC 4336 Percussion Ensemble IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Students will gain ensemble experience on a variety of percussion instruments.Available only to music majors who are pursuing the Bachelor or Music. degree. Audition required. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3336 or permission of instructor. Audition required.
Corequisites: None


MUSC 4350 Advanced Conducting
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course continues with concepts introduced in Beginning Conducting. Students will learn more about scores, including transposition of instruments, ranges and tonal colors of voices and instruments, and advanced baton and hand-conducting techniques. Assignments will include the conducting of Snow College ensembles. Students will learn to function as ensemble leaders and will also demonstrate and defend their musical decision-making, both individually and collaboration with other students. Students will have the opportunity to synthesize the theoretical, analytical, historical and cultural components of their coursework in the process of functioning as a leader in the music making process.
Prerequisites: MUSC 2350, MUSC 3540, MUSC 3640


MUSC 4363 Orchestra MIDI Mock-ups
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course focuses on the creation of realistic, electronically produced mockups of orchestral compositions. Students will make an in-depth study of sample-based virtual instruments and their manipulation through Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI). Emphasis will be placed on achieving realism by controlling various MIDI parameters.


MUSC 4405 World Music Studies
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course provides students with a rigorous introduction to selected musical traditions from various parts of the globe. Through the use of a comparative analytical framework, which includes perspectives from ethnomusicology, the cognitive sciences, and psychoacoustics, students will learn to critically analyze and appreciate the selected musical traditions. These traditions will be approached from within their own cultural contexts and viewed as a social process. Students will develop an understanding of what music is, what it means to its practitioners and audiences, and the means by which musical meaning is transmitted. Emphasis is placed on recognition and analysis of the salient musical characteristics of each tradition, the artists who made major contributions to those traditions, and the particular musical instruments that are iconic to each.


MUSC 4406 Jazz Chamber Music IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: Chamber ensemble groups for jazz musicians. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression. Registration by permission of instructor. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3406 or permission of Instructor. Audition required.


MUSC 4440 Audio Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:1)

Description: This course focuses on the study of the fundamentals of sound and how it can be captured, manipulated, and reproduced. It includes the study of the history of recording and studio equipment, digital recording and other audio processing tools, as well as techniques for mixing and mastering. This course also begins the development of technical aural perception skills needed when making decisions pertaining to recorded or live music or audio.
Corequisites: MUSC 3350 Music Technology I ? suggested corequisite


MUSC 4450 Audio Recording Techniques I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course is an in-depth study of the technical characteristics and performance of each component of the recording studio. Topics include advanced studio electronics and signal flow, computer-based digital recording and editing, automated console operations, condenser microphones, spatial signal processing, and the role of the audio engineer.
Prerequisites: MUSC 4440 or permission of instructor


MUSC 4556 Private Guitar IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual guitar instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student's technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. The course promotes synthesis various types of musical knowledge. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 3000 level private instruction in order to register for 4000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 4566 Private Organ, Fourth Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5-1:1-2)

Description: This course provides students with individual organ instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student’s technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills as well as developing a student’s understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. The course promotes synthesis various types of musical knowledge. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 3000 level private instruction in order to register for 4000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 4596 Private Piano IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual piano; instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student's technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. The course promotes synthesis various types of musical knowledge. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 3000 level private instruction in order to register for 4000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 4616 Private Voice IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual vocal instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student's technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. The course promotes synthesis various types of musical knowledge. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 3000 level private instruction in order to register for 4000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Completion of two semesters of MUSC 3616. Permission of instructor.


MUSC 4626 Private Woodwinds IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5-1:1-2)

Description: This course provides students with individual woodwind instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. This course develops and improves a students technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. The course promotes synthesis of various types of musical knowledge. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 3000 level private instruction in order to register for 4000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required. The course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3626 and permission of instructor


MUSC 4656 Private Brass, Fourth Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual brass instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves a student's technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills as well as developing a student's understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. The course promotes synthesis various types of musical knowledge. A jury is required at the end of the semester. The jury accounts for 20% of the grade for the course. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 3000 level private instruction in order to register for 4000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 4686 Private Percussion IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students with individual percussion instruction. Private instruction is required of music majors each semester during college. Music majors receive one-hour lessons each week of the semester. The course is repeatable for credit. This course develops and improves technical, interpretive, improvisational, pedagogical, and sight reading skills as well as developing understanding of the history and repertory of the specific instrument/voice. The course promotes synthesis various types of musical knowledge. A jury is required at the end of the semester. Students must successfully pass the jury at the end of their second semester of 3000 level private instruction in order to register for 4000 level private instruction. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 4696 Private Composition/Production
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction at an advanced level. Private instruction is required of all music majors each semester. Music performance majors are required to take 60-minute lessons each week, while music education and music therapy students are required to take 30-minute lessons each week. All students are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is also available to non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and performance skills. An additional fee is required. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Successful completion of two semesters of MUSC 3696.


MUSC 4700 Audio Production II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is an in depth study of the technical characteristics and performance of each element of the recording studio. It is required for students completing the production advisement track of the bachelor of music degree.
Prerequisites: Completion of MUSC 4450, or permission of the instructor.


MUSC 4736 Private Strings, Fourth Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5-1:1-2)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction at an advanced level. Private instruction is required of all music majors each semester. Music performance majors are required to take 60-minute lessons each week, while music education and music therapy students are required to take 30-minute lessons each week. All students are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is also available to non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and performance skills. An additional fee is required. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor


MUSC 4750 Electronic Music
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is required for students pursing the bachelor of music degree--music production advisement track. Students will undertake an in-depth study of sound synthesis, its history and various forms. Students will learn to craft custom sounds using analog voltage controlled oscillators, filters, envelope generators and other tools, as well as how these skills function in the digital realm.
Prerequisites: MUSC 4450, or permission of instructor.


MUSC 4840 Live Sound/Concert Production
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:1)

Description: This course is required for students completing the bachelor of music degree music production advisement track. Students in this course will learn the fundamentals of live sound, including digital and analog soundboard operation, microphones and microphone placement, front of house and monitor mixing, and stage set up.


MUSC 4856 Private Jazz IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5:1)

Description: This course provides individual musical instruction in jazz at the beginning to intermediate level. This course augments but does not replace private study on the major instrument, and can not be taken in the place of private lessons. All students taking this course are also required to participate in regular master classes, recitals and juries which fulfill the lab portion of the course. The course is also available to non-music majors who wish to develop their musicianship and performance skills. An additional fee is required.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


MUSC 4901 Senior Capstone
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course provides students the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the concepts and skills necessary for completion of all tracks of the Bachelor of Music with Emphasis in Commercial Music, and is required of all students pursuing the degree. The course is project based; students will propose and complete projects designed to show their abilities and present these in a public forum, either live or online. Examples of these projects might include solo performances, audio or video recording of works, or the preparation of an online portfolio. In addition to completing the project, will learn or apply the skills necessary to present the project, including necessary computer, print, design, and marketing skills necessary to present their materials to the public.
Prerequisites: Completion of all BMCM junior level courses, or permission of the instructor.


MUSC 4905 Senior Recital
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:1)

Description: This course is to be taken in the final year of residence before graduation. Students will demonstrate through performance of a varied repertoire their ability to synthesize and artistically render musical knowledge and skills gained through private and ensemble study as well as theoretical and historical coursework. Students not pursuing the performance advisement track may opt to complete a senior project in production or composition.
Prerequisites: At least one semester of fourth year private lessons.
Corequisites: Enrollment in fourth year private lessons.


MUSC 4976 Chamber Vocal Ensemble, Fourth Year
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course will provide small group training in a variety of choral music literature. This ensemble will provide students with an opportunity to develop technical skill, sight-reading ability, and knowledge of the repertory related to the ensemble. It further allows students to synthesize musical, historical and cultural knowledge into meaningful artistic expression Registration by permission of instructor. Audition required. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: MUSC 3976 or permission of instructor. Audition required.
N


NR 1010 Introduction to Natural Resources
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: Introduction to Natural Resources is a course designed to help students learn what careers are available in multiple natural resource fields. This class also gives students an introduction to the history, problems and potential solutions in natural resource fields by giving them the opportunity to see examples in the field.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


NR 1020 Field Inventory and Sampling Techniques
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course will teach the correct methods of field inventory and sampling techniques within air, water, vegetation and wildlife management through lectures and hands-on field laboratory exercises. Students will learn practical skills and common practices for collecting and assessing data relative to conservation and managment. Students will also learn basic data analysis techniques and interpret the data to make basic managment decisions.Course formerly known as Environmental Sampling and Analysis.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


NR 1030 Fundamentals of Food Production Systems
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course will cover food production’s dependence on natural resources for feeding a growing U.S. and world population. Historical and modern crop and livestock production practices and innovations along with developments in sustainable agronomic practices will be covered.
Prerequisites: N/A


NR 1700 Natural Resource Leadership
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Students who take this course will be involved in the Snow College Natural Resource Club. This course will assist students in gaining a competitive edge through engagement in career exploration, leadership development, hands-on field experience, networking with professionals, and engaging in community service. This course creates learning opportunities outside of the classroom that will help solidify concepts learned in the classroom.


NR 1900 Natural Resource Projects
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to help students find and learn from real life experiences in areas of natural resources.; Internships will focus on real-time projects available from public and private organizations.; The purpose of the internship experience is to provide students with hands-on learning that will help them be more attractive to potential employers and transfer programs.;;;
Prerequisites: NA


NR 2010 Environmental Policy and Reporting
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to governmental policy and regulations. Students will learn about policies and regulations including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The course will also include an introduction to governmental reporting on data obtained in the field.


NR 2030 Agricultural Ecosystem Management
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course will cover food production's dependence on natural resources for feeding a growing U.S. and world population. Historical and modern crop and livestock production practices and innovations along with developments in sustainable agronomic practices will be covered.


NR 2425 Wildland Plant Identification
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:4)

Description: This course introduces general principles of identifying and classifying plants. Students will also learn the basic ecology and uses of wildland plants. Emphasis is given to 200 common North American wildland plants.


NR 2820 Pesticide Applicator Safety Certification
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2)

Description: Safety training in natural resources helps students obtain the necessary skills and certifications to allow them to be employable in the field and perform required duties safely. In this specific training, students will earn the Utah Pesticide Applicator License, which is required to spray weeds and pests within the state for private companies and government agencies. Licensure fee required.
Prerequisites: NA
Corequisites: NA


NR 2850 Special Topics
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This course is designed to address a special topic associated with the discipline that may not be included as a part of the normal curriculum.; Topics may be extensions of current field of study or it may include possible future additions to the departmental curriculum.


NR 2997 Natural Resources Internship
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on, field based experiences in natural resources. Internships are an opportunity for students to link theory with practice. They are also designed to help students network with professionals, increasing their opportunities to receive full-time employment after graduation. Internships can introduce students to multiple professions within natural resources, helping them narrow down their specific areas of interest early on in their college experience. They are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the workplace. Internships can be paid or volunteer with a business, organization, or government agency and are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a natural resource faculty member and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Each credit requires 45 clock hours of internship experience. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


NURP 1000 Introduction to Medical Terminology
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: Medical Terminology provides the basic knowledge and background of the technical language of medicine. Students learn the origins and definitions of root words, affixes, and abbreviations used in medicine today. This course is recommended for anyone interested in a health or medical field of study. This course is a structured, 15-week, online course which uses a textbook.


NURP 1101 Drug Dosages and Calculations
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: The student will study and master the skills of calculating drug dosages accurately. The course covers a basic review of math, conversions, and calculations for oral, injectable, and intravenous drugs. This course is highly recommended for the Snow College Nursing programs.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


NURP 1102 Fundamentals of Nursing
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:2:6)

Description: This course presents nursing theory, practical application of nursing skills, and the responsibilities of the practical nurse. Critical thinking skills will also be developed. Students will demonstrate competency through written tests and skills pass-off sessions in the nursing laboratory. This course prepares students for client care and becoming part of the professional health care team. Students must be accepted into the Practical Nursing program to take this course. Students will schedule times for specific skill testing and open nursing lab time with the course instructor. This course is part of a required series to prepare students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN). (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


NURP 1103 Pharmacology
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course is a study of the fundamental principles of pharmacology, medication administration, and a review of math principles. The major focus of this course is identification of medicinal categories with the accompanying pharmacological actions, uses, precautions, and nursing implications. Students must have been accepted into the Practical Nursing program to enroll. This course is part of a required series to prepare students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN).
Prerequisites: Acceptance into practical nursing program
Corequisites: NURP 1102, 1106, 1114


NURP 1107 Maternity Nursing
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: This course is designed to help students obtain mastery and practical application of the skills of assessment and care of the expectant mother, and infant client with appropriate interventions and evaluation in preparation for the clinical setting. Students must be accepted into the Practice Nursing program and have completed NURP 1102, NURP 1103 and NURP 1116 with a 74% (C) or better to enroll in this course. This course is part of a required series to prepare students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN).
Prerequisites: NURP 1102 NURP 1116 NURP 1103
Corequisites: NURP 1118


NURP 1109 Professional Transition for the Practical Nurse
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: This course is designed to prepare the student practical nurse for employment in today?s world of nursing. This course is based on career planning, job seeking, legal and ethical issues, professional organizations, Utah Nurse Practice Act, and preparation for the National Licensing Examination. Students must be accepted into the Practical Nursing program to enroll. This course is part of a required series to prepare students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN). (Additional class fees required.)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the nursing program. Successful completion of NURP 1102, 1103, and 1116 with a 74% (C) or better.
Corequisites: None


NURP 1110 Intravenous Therapy Certification
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0.5:1)

Description: This course is for the Licensed Practical Nurse, the beginning Registered Nurse, or those practitioners wanting a refresher course in intravenous therapy (I.V. therapy). The course content will include legal aspects, standard precautions, I.V. start skills, and monitoring for complications. Emphasis will be given to complication prevention, use and monitoring of equipment, employers policies and procedures, body fluids, electrolytes, and acid-base balance. Repeatable for credit. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: Must be a LPN, RN, or have permission from Chair.
Corequisites: N/A


NURP 1117 Medical-Surgical Nursing Across the Lifespan II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: The course is designed to introduce the student to additional information about the active role of the practical nurse in health care delivery. Emphasis is on the application of the nursing process to enable health promotion and prevention. This course will reinforce knowledge obtained during the first semester of the nursing program. Patient care concepts, mental health concepts, and emergency care of the medical-surgical patient across the lifespan are reviewed. The course?s purpose is to assist the student in understanding the care concepts and mental illnesses that affect their patients and their families. Students must pass fall semester LPN courses with a 74% (C) or above to enroll. This course is part of a required series to prepare students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN).
Prerequisites: NURP 1102, NURP 1103, NURP 1116 Completion of fall semester LPN courses with 74%(C) or above.
Corequisites: NURP 1118


NURP 1118 Medical-Surgical Nursing Across the Lifespan Clinical
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:9)

Description: This course is the clinical component of NURP 1107, NURP 1114, and NURP 1117. Emphasis is on the application of the nursing process to enable health promotion and prevention across the lifespan in a clinical setting. The course is designed to apply and demonstrate mastery of the skills necessary in the health care setting of the Practical Nurse. The student will gain an awareness of the roles of other health care team members and community resources. Students must pass fall semester LPN courses and NURP 1107 with a 74%(C) or above to enroll. This course is part of a required series to prepare students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN).
Prerequisites: NURP 1102, NURP 1103, NURP 1116 Completion of fall semester LPN courses with 74% (C) or above.
Corequisites: NURP 1107 & NURP 1117


NURP 2114 Advanced Nursing Care of the Adult and Child
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to more complex physiological and psychosocial needs of clients across the lifespan and the active role of the registered nurse in health care delivery. The course emphasis is to prepare students to focus on acute illness and conditions, as well as chronic and disabling conditions and establish critical thinking and clinical decision-making for each disease process. This course will reinforce the effects of acute and chronic illness on clients and their families and familiarize students in consulting and collaborating with other members of the multidisciplinary health care team. The course reinforces previously learned concepts and focuses on the registered nurse making nursing judgments timely and applying those appropriate clinical decisions. This course is a corequisite course with NURP 2214. To enroll, students must be accepted into the Registered Nursing Program. This course is part of a required series to prepare students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: NURP 1114, NURP 1115, NURP 1106, NURP 1107, or equivalent with an accredited Practical Nursing Program
Corequisites: NURP 2214


NURP 2130 Advanced Nursing Pharmacology and Treatment Modalities
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course addresses advanced treatments used by nurses to promote life-long health including pharmacological agents and non-pharmacological therapy treatments like art, music, pet, meditation, visualization, imagery, and validation. It also covers drugs that affect the endocrine system and cardiovascular system, antibiotics, blood products, calcium replacement agents, chemotherapy drugs, anti-Parkinson drugs, IV therapy, prostate drugs, and biological response modifiers. To enroll, students must be accepted into the Registered Nursing program. This course is part of a required series preparing students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).
Prerequisites: NURP 1103 or equivalent from an accredited Practical Nursing Program


NURP 2180 Mental Health Across the Lifespan
Semester(s) Taught: Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: Students study strategies for promoting mental health and preventing life-long illnesses. Various tasks of the psychiatric nurse are introduced with an emphasis on the dynamics and theories behind basic psychopathological conditions. Students learn the nursing processes required for restoring and rehabilitating patients with psychiatric disorders. A primary goal of this course is to develop essential communication skills in an interdisciplinary environment. To enroll, students must be accepted into the Registered Nursing program. This course is part of a required series preparing students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).
Prerequisites: NURP 1108 or equivalent with an accredited Practical Nursing program.
Corequisites: NURP 2280


NURP 2190 Patient Care Management
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: Theory focuses on the synthesis of the nursing knowledge and skills necessary for a registered nurse to enter practice. Licensing, job seeking skills, professionalism, managing, and legal and ethical issues are addressed. To enroll, students must be accepted into the Registered Nursing program. This course is part of a required series preparing students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NLEX-RN). (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: NURP 2130, NURP 2114, NURP 2214
Corequisites: NURP 2290


NURP 2214 Advanced Nursing Care of the Adult and Child Clinical
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:0:12)

Description: This is a corequisite course to NURP 2114 that expands on the learning processes of medical-surgical concepts through clinical application. Students will provide care in a variety of health care settings, functioning as part of a health care team to provide nursing care within the scope of practice as mandated by the Utah State Board of Nursing. A total of 180 hours per semester is required. To enroll, students must be accepted into the Registered Nursing program. This course is part of a required series preparing students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: NURP 1114, NURP 1115, NURP 1106, NURP 1107 or equivalent with an accredited Practical Nursing Program.
Corequisites: NURP 2114


NURP 2280 Mental Health Nursing Across the Lifespan Clinical
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: This is a companion course to NURP 2180 that provides clinical application of psychiatric/mental health nursing methodology. Students will focus on patients in a variety of health care settings with mental health needs. The course requires 45 clinical hours per semester. To enroll, students must be accepted into the Registered Nursing program. This course is part of a required series preparing students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).
Corequisites: NURP 2180


NURP 2290 Patient Care Management Clinical
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:9)

Description: A companion course to NURP 2190, NURP 2290 Clinical focuses on the synthesis of the nursing knowledge and skills necessary for a registered nurse to enter practice. Licensing, job seeking skills, professionalism, managing, and legal and ethical issues are addressed. Hours are a concentrated four-week block and are completed as if the student were a full time employee. To enroll, students must be accepted into the Registered Nursing program. This course is part of a required series preparing students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: NURP 2130, NURP 2114, NURP 2214
Corequisites: NURP 2190


NURP 2400 Special Topics in Nursing
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course offers an international travel experience and exposure to the culture of selected countries in order to think critically and comparatively about healthcare and welfare systems globally. Topics may include folklore and superstition, death and rituals of dying, famine and migration, women?s healthcare, religion and healthcare, and implications of political change. Comprehensive mandatory field trips are integrated with the class to reinforce the learning outcomes. There will be an opportunity to meet with healthcare professionals from the selected countries. Students will be responsible for travel expenses. This course is repeatable for credit. Instructor permission is required.
Prerequisites: NURP 1102, 1103, 1116 or NURP 2130, 2214
O


OLE 1000 Introduction to Outdoor Leadership
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course focuses on outdoor leadership by introducing and exposing students to the history and various theories of outdoor leadership principles, practices, and ethics. Emphasis is also placed on implementation, evaluation and transference of leadership characteristics beyond an outdoor environment. Students apply leadership skills while planning and implementing a three-day outdoor adventure to be carried out during the semester.


OLE 1010 Outdoor Leadership Business and Careers
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1.5:3)

Description: This course explores the outdoor industry and associated careers. It provides students opportunities with and exposure to a variety of outdoor-related businesses and organizations (private, non-profit, and government). Students will produce outdoor products/services and develop a workable business plan. (Field trips required)


OLE 1505 Kayaking
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5:2)

Description: This course provides an introduction to the fundamental skills and knowledge of kayaking. The course will cover proper use and care of equipment, paddling strokes and techniques, reading water flow patterns on flat and white water rivers, safety measures, and self-rescue techniques. Students must pass a swimming test. (Additional fee and field trip required).


OLE 1515 Sailing
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5:2)

Description: This course addresses sailing theory, sailing nomenclature, parts of the boat, how to launch and retrieve the boat, how to rig and trim the boat for various points of sail. Students will be exposed to various types of sailing boats and experiences, which may include keelboats, catamaran, sailing canoe, dinghies, and boardsailing. (Additional Fee and Field trip required)


OLE 1527 Rock Climbing
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:.5:2)

Description: This course provides an introduction to the fundamental skills and knowledge of rock climbing. The course will cover proper use and care of equipment, basic knots, movement on rock, belaying, rappelling, climbing classifications, and climbing related Leave No Trace Outdoor Ethics and techniques. (Additional fee required).


OLE 1535 Backpacking
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course provides students an introduction to the fundamental skills and knowledge of backpacking. Students will learn about proper clothing, equipment and use, sheltering, cooking, travel techniques, safety, and Leave No Trace ethics. This course may be repeated for credit. (Additional fee and field trip required.)


OLE 1542 Wilderness First Responder
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course addresses the practice of advanced wilderness medical techniques and protocols for situations requiring extended patient care and management in remote, backcountry, or wilderness environments with limited resources. SOLO Wilderness First Responder Certification offered with successful completion. (Course fee required.)


OLE 1635 Backcountry Skiing
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: This course provides an introduction to the fundamental skills and knowledge of backcountry skiing, including proper winter attire and equipment use and care, travel techniques, winter safety, and environmental awareness. (Additional fee required.)
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


OLE 1655 Snowshoeing
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: This course provides students an introduction to the fundamental skills and knowledge of snowshoeing. Students will learn about proper winter clothing, equipment and use, travel techniques, winter safety, and environmental awareness.(Additional fee required.)


OLE 1660 Winter Camping
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0.5:3)

Description: This course provides students an introduction to the fundamental skills and knowledge of winter camping. Students will learn about proper winter clothing, equipment and use, sheltering, cooking, travel techniques, winter safety, and environmental awareness.(Additional fee and field trip required.)


OLE 2000 Outdoor Skills
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1.5:3)

Description: This course provides a foundation to outdoor skills in specialized backcountry environments. Topics covered include specialized travel techniques, navigation, teaching, decision making/problem solving, Leave No Trace Outdoor Ethics, and environment specific camping skills, specialized equipment and clothing selection and use. (Additonal fee and field trip required.)


OLE 2200 Expedition Leadership
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0.5:3)

Description: This course provides an experiential approach in addressing the planning, logistics, and safety and risk management needed to design and implement outdoor expeditions. Emphasis is on development of leadership through sound judgment, decision-making, while instructing in backcountry/wilderness environments. (Additional fee and field trip required.)


OLE 2450 Climbing Technical Leadership
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1.5:3)

General Ed Requirement: Integrated Exploration (IE)
Description: This course provides a combination of theoretical background and technical aspects of leading and managing groups in a vertical environment and emphasizes hands-on skill development such as rope systems, anchors, rappelling and belaying, protection placement, lead climbing, site management, risk management, related emergency procedures, and Leave No Trace Outdoor Ethics. (An additional fee and field trips required.)


OLE 2550 Winter Technical Leadership
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1.5:3)

General Ed Requirement: Integrated Exploration (IE)
Description: This course provides a combination of theoretical background and technical aspects of leading and managing groups in winter environments, highlighting avalanche awareness, while utilizing specialized hands-on skill development such as snowshoeing, skiing, and ice climbing. It will emphasize specialized clothing/equipment selection, care, and maintenance, equipment nomenclature, technical aspects of avalanche awareness and assessment, backcountry travel and route finding, risk management, and related beacon search and rescue procedures. (Additional fee and field trips required.)


OLE 2600 Adventure Education
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This course provides a theoretical background and hands-on application of adventure education utilizing concepts such as real and perceived risk, sequencing, utilizing peak experiences, leadership styles and development, debriefing, framing, and metaphor use.


OLE 2650 Ropes Course Technical Leadership
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1.5:3)

General Ed Requirement: Integrated Exploration (IE)
Description: This course provides a combination of theoretical background and technical aspects of leading and managing groups in a challenge environment and will emphasize hands-on skill development such as spotting/belaying, equipment management selection, and care, program design/sequencing, facilitation strategies, course design and maintenance, risk management, and related emergency procedures.


OLE 2750 River/Water Technical Leadership
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1.5:3)

General Ed Requirement: Integrated Exploration (IE)
Description: This course provides a combination of theoretical background and technical aspects of leading and managing groups in a water environment and will emphasize hands-on skill development such as equipment selection, care, and maintenance, equipment nomenclature, strokes, self and group rescues, reading and recognizing water features/hydrology, site management, risk management, and related emergency procedures. (Additional fee and field trips required.)


OLE 2998 Outdoor Leadership Internship
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:0)

Description: This course is a practical application of outdoor leadership where students will apply knowledge and techniques to a minimum of 100 hours of experience in a department approved outdoor leadership and entrepreneurship-based organization.;;
P


PE 1010 Aerobics l
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course utilizes a variety of aerobic exercises, including step aerobics, to improve fitness and promote a healthy lifestyle. Repeatable for credit.


PE 1011 Zumba
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course offers an aerobic and muscle conditioning fitness class utilizing the Zumba program to improve fitness and promote a healthy lifestyle. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


PE 1015 Spinning I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This is a fitness course that uses Spinning Bikes to improve overall fitness, including cardiovascular fitness and muscular endurance. This course is repeatable for credit. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


PE 1016 Spin II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This is a second level spin class for those who have already completed level one spin. This is a fitness course that uses spinning bikes to improve overall fitness, including cardiovascular fitness and muscular endurance. (Additional fee required)


PE 1043 Jogging
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Fundamentals of running to enhance an aerobic personal fitness program. Endurance strategies and running techniques will be taught in this class.


PE 1067 Triathlon
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course offers the opportunity to discover one of America's fastest growing sports and will help students develop skills and interests that will bring a lifetime of enjoyment and health promotion. Triathlon is designed to introduce safe and fitness oriented swimming, bicycling and running as lifetime sports as a means of acquiring cardio respiratory endurance, muscle strength and proper weight and body maintenance. Triathlon is designed for students who wish to gain a full understanding of multi-sport events and how to properly train for and compete in a triathlon. A triathlon is a race that features swimming, road cycling and running. This course is repeatable.


PE 1073 Circuit Training
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is a physical education activity class combining aerobic and strength training exercises utilizing the weight and aerobic machines in the fitness center at the activity center. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


PE 1085 Weight Training
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is a weight-training program using free weights. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


PE 1096 Fitness and Wellness
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Education (PE)
Description: Fitness and Wellness is a course that will help increase student awareness of the need for a lifetime fitness and wellness program. Students will develop programs and participate in activities to help them implement a lifetime commitment to fitness and wellness.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


PE 1098 Racquet Sports
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is for students who are interested in learning the skills, scoring and rules necessary to play racquetball, tennis, pickleball and badminton. This course is repeatable.


PE 1100 Tennis l (Formerly PHED 1360)
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is designed to teach basic tennis strokes, rules, and scoring.


PE 1101 Tennis ll
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is designed to teach intermediate to advanced tennis skills. This course also includes game strategy.
Prerequisites: PE 1100 or instructor approval


PE 1110 Racquetball I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This physical education activity class is designed to help students understand the rules and strategies of racquetball, to help them improve their skills, and play safely and effectively.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


PE 1111 Racquetball II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is a physical education activity class designed to help students improve and develop advanced skills in racquetball. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Racquetball l or instructor approval


PE 1125 Pickleball
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Pickleball is an activity class that will focus on skill development and understanding of strategies and rules of the game. The game, one of the fastest growing activities in the U.S., is played with a paddle, wiffleball and a three-foot high net on a badminton sized court. Skills are similar to tennis. This course is repeatable.


PE 1130 Golf l
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is designed to teach basic golf skills, scoring, rules, and etiquette. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


PE 1131 Golf II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is designed for experienced golfers. The class covers strategy of the short game, putting, distance and club selection, etiquette, rules; and golf course management. Students will play 10 rounds of golf on Palisade golf course or any course of their choosing.; This course is repeatable for credit. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: Golf l or permission of instructor


PE 1135 Archery l
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Shooting skills and care of equipment. Must be able to physically draw back and hold a 25 lb. bow. Must be able to understand and follow a Range Master's Safety signals. If the sudent's physical limitations require a crossbow, please visit with the Snow College ADA Coordinator prior to enrolling in the class. Fee required.


PE 1136 Archery ll
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Advanced archery skills. Must be able to physically draw back and hold a 25 lb bow. Must be able to understand and follow a Range Master's Safety signals. If the sudent's physical limitations require a crossbow, please visit with the Snow College ADA Coordinator prior to enrolling in the class.Fee required.


PE 1145 Bowling
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course teaches the student how to average scores, develop handicaps, and score bowling games. The class is divided into teams and competes in regular bowling leagues. Students also learn about tap nine bowling, low score bowling and Baker bowling. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


PE 1191 Softball Sports Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:10)

Description: This course is for first year members of the women's intercollegiate softball team at Snow College. It is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 1192 Women's Basketball Sports Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:10)

Description: This course is for first-year members of the women's intercollegiate basketball team at Snow College. It is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 1193 Mens Basketball Sports Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:10)

Description: This course is for first year members of the men's intercollegiate basketball team at Snow College. It is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission


PE 1194 Volleyball Sports Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2-8)

Description: This Course is for first year members of the Womens intercollegiate volleyball team at Snow College. It is not repeatable for credit.


PE 1195 Football Sports Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2-8)

Description: This course is for first-year members of the men's intercollegiate football team at Snow College. It is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 1196 Women's Soccer Conditioning I
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-1:0:2-8)

Description: This course is a conditioning course for first year members of the Women's Intercollegiate soccer team at Snow College.


PE 1197 Men's Soccer Conditioning I
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-1:0:2-8)

Description: This is a conditioning course for first year members of the Men's Intercollegiate soccer team at Snow College.


PE 1200 Basketball Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is designed to teach fundamental basketball skills of passing, shooting, team play, strategy, and rules.
Prerequisites: None


PE 1210 Volleyball
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This physical education activity class is designed to help students understand the rules and strategies of volleyball, to help them improve their skills, and play safely and effectively.


PE 1211 Intermediate Volleyball
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course is a physical education activity class designed to help students improve and develop advanced skills in volleyball.
Prerequisites: PE 1210 or instructor approval


PE 1215 Walleyball
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This physical education activity class is designed to help students understand the rules and strategies of walleyball, to help them improve their skills, and play safely and effectively.


PE 1225 Softball
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course teaches the fundamentals of softball and team play.


PE 1230 Soccer
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: The student will learn and exhibit basic skills and correct fundamentals of beginning soccer. Students will improve cardiovascular endurance and develop physical fitness and skill. Students will be able to exhibit team effort and know the strategies and skill of playing soccer in a team setting.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


PE 1300 Beginning Swimming
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: In this course students will learn to swim. They will gain experience and comfortably display the five basic swimming strokes: front crawl, back crawl, elementary backstroke, sidestroke and breaststroke. The students will also learn to dive from the bank and low-board. They will be taught to swim fully clothed and use their clothes as a flotation device.
Prerequisites: None


PE 1301 Intermediate Swimming
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course will help students improve their ability to swim and to build on their previous skills in the six different strokes: front crawl, back crawl, breaststroke, butterfly, elementary backstroke and sidestroke. The butterfly will be taught only in this course, not in Beginning Swimming. Students will also learn a competitive turn or open turn and an approach dive off the low-board. They will also be taught to swim fully clothed and use their clothes as a flotation device.


PE 1302 Advanced Swimming
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: Students will improve their swimming skills in freestyle, back crawl, breaststroke and butterfly. The class will provide timed swims and a regular workout schedule.


PE 1310 Water Fitness
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course provide students the opportunity to increase physical fitness through a variety of cardiorespiratory, strength, and flexibility exercises in the swimming pool. This course is repeatable for credit.


PE 1340 Lifeguard Training
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: The primary purpose of the American Red Cross Lifeguarding program is to provide entry-level lifeguard candidates with the skills and knowledge to prevent, recognize, and respond to emergencies and to provide care for injuries and sudden illnesses until advanced medical personnel arrive and take over. (Additional fee required)
Prerequisites: A candidate must be 15 years of age on or before the final scheduled session of this course. The candidate must also successfully complete the following swimming requirements: Swim 300 yards (6 laps of the pool) continuously using these strokes in the following order: 100 yards of front crawl showing rhythmic breathing and a stablizing propellant flutter kick 100 yards of breaststroke 100 yards of either front crawl or breaststroke They must swim 20 yards using front crawl or breaststroke, surface dive to a depth of 7-12 feet, retrieve a 10 pound object, return to the surface, and swim back to the starting point with the object. They must be able to tread water for 2 minutes with their hands in their arm pits.


PE 1345 Water Safety Instruction
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: Students will learn to use the American Red Cross instructor's Learn To Swim programs to teach swimming skills to all age groups.Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive a Water Safety Instructor certificate.
Prerequisites: Candidates must be 16 years of age on or before the final scheduled session of this course. They must be able to demonstrate the ability to perform the following swimming strokes: front crawl, back crawl, breaststroke, elementary backstroke and sidestroke for 25 yards each. They must also be able to demonstrate the butterfly stroke for 15 yards.


PE 1410 Tai Chi I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:1)

Description: This course introduces students to the basic movements of Tai Chi in order to better understand how the integration of body, mind, and spirit benefits the practitioner. Tai Chi is a valuable cross training exercise for students of all abilities, as it facilitates deep stretches, relaxed strength, whole body coordination, balance, centered alignment, weight shifting, and moving with fluid grace. It improves the coordination and integration of left and right and upper and lower halves of the body; and the extremities of the body, with the inside core. On a more subtle level, Tai Chi unifies body and mind. Movements are paired with conscious breathing. Multiple cognitive and emotional components ? including focused attention, visualization, and intention lead to greater self-awareness and a sense of peace. Repeatable for credit. This class is cross-listed as DANC 1410.


PE 1501 Intercollegiate Esports
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:1)

Description: This course is for first-year members of the intercollegiate esports team at Snow College.
Prerequisites: Instructor Permission
Corequisites: None


PE 1543 First Aid and CPR
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:1)

Description: This class teaches lifesaving techniques. It is taught using the American Heart Association curriculum (CPR and AED) along with AAOS  (American Academy of Orthopedic surgeons) first aid guidelines. (Additional fee required)


PE 1560 Riding and Horsemanship
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:2)

Description: This is a physical education activity course which will include trail riding, horse and rider safety, knowledge of basic items of tack and equipment, and feed and care of the horse.
Corequisites: Students need to provide their own horse.


PE 1710 Western Swing Dance
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course teaches the student how to western swing dance and line dance. Approximately 11 line dances are taught and a variety of swing moves. This is taught at the Ephraim Social Hall (top floor of Roy's Pizza) every Wednesday night at 7:00 pm for two hours. The Snow College Western Dance Club sponsors a dance each Wednesday night after class from 9:00 pm to 11:30 pm.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


PE 1891 Intercollegiate Softball - Women
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:10)

Description: This course is for first-year members of the women's intercollegiate softball team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 1892 Intercollegiate Basketball - Women
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2-8)

Description: This course is for first-year members of the women's intercollegiate basketball team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 1893 Intercollegiate Basketball - Men
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2-8)

Description: This course is for first-year members of the men's intercollegiate basketball team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 1894 Intercollegiate Volleyball - Women
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:10)

Description: This course is for first-year members of the women's intercollegiate volleyball team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 1895 Intercollegiate Football - Men
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:10)

Description: This course is for first-year members of the men's intercollegiate football team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 1896 Intercollegiate Soccer - Men I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:10)

Description: This Course is for first year members of the men's intercollegiate soccer team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor permission


PE 1897 Intercollegiate Soccer - Women I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:10)

Description: This Course is for first year members of the women's intercollegiate soccer team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor permission


PE 1997 Physical Education Internship
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on experiences in Physical Education. Internships are an opportunity for students to link theory with practice. They are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the Physical Education. Internships are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a faculty member in the PE Department and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is recommended for Freshman and is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Additional fees required. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.


PE 2010 Introduction to Physical Education
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Any student seeking a career in physical education and related areas should take this course.; The course is required for physical education majors. We study the history of physical education in America, sports in society, job opportunities in various sporting careers, and the psychology of sport.


PE 2030 Organization Intramural Sports
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course teaches the development of sports tournaments, units of competition, scoring systems and coordination of intramural sports programs with physical education and athletics in secondary and postsecondary schools.


PE 2191 Softball Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:10)

Description: This course is for second year members of the women's intercollegiate softball team at Snow College. It is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission


PE 2192 Women's Basketball Sports Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:10)

Description: This course is for second-year members of the women's intercollegiate basketball team at Snow College. It is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 2193 Men's Basketball Sports Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:3)

Description: This course is for second-year members of the men's intercollegiate basketball team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 2194 Volleyball Sports Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-1:0:2-8)

Description: This Course is for second year members of the Womens intercollegiate volleyball team at Snow College. It is not repeatable for credit.


PE 2195 Football Sports Conditioning
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2-8)

Description: This course is for second-year members of the men's intercollegiate football team at Snow College. It is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 2196 Women's Soccer Conditioning II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-1:0:2-8)

Description: This course is a conditioning course for second year members of the Women's Intercollegiate soccer team at Snow College.


PE 2197 Men's Soccer Conditioning II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-1:0:2-8)

Description: This course is a conditioning course for second year members of the Men's Intercollegiate soccer team at Snow College.


PE 2222 Playground Education and Recreation
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course involves lecture and practical work in the selection and use of suitable materials and methods used for directing and teaching age-level groups different skills and games. Students will learn organization and leadership skills for a variety of social and recreation games.


PE 2416 Intercollegiate Volleyball Women
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:10)

Description: This course is for members of the Women's Intercollegiate Volleyball Team at Snow College. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor


PE 2436 Intercollegiate Softball Women
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:10)

Description: This course is for members of the Women's Intercollegiate Softball Team at Snow College.; Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor


PE 2466 Intercollegiate Basketball - Women
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:10)

Description: This course is for members of the Women's Intercollegiate Basketball Team at Snow College. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor


PE 2500 Personal Training
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:1)

Description: This course is designed to give students the knowledge and understanding necessary to prepare for the ACSM Personal Trainer Certification Exam. Students will be taught skills, such as exercise programming and nutrition planning, that will help them to facilitate lifetime changes in clients as well as help them improve in posture, movement, flexibility, balance, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength and endurance. In addition, they will be taught keys to helping clients adhere to nutrition and behavior changes that will improve their overall wellbeing. Upon completion of this class, students will have the option to register for and take the ACSM Personal Trainer Exam through the ACSM?s website and testing programs. (Certification is not available at Snow College.)


PE 2600 Introduction to Sports Medicine
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:1)

Description: This course provides a basic introduction to the theory and practice of sports medicine for future athletic trainers, coaches, physical education majors, and pre-physical therapy majors. Sports medicine will be approached systematically through a combination of lectures and hands-on labs stressing injury evaluation and preventative taping methods. Injury rehabilitation and prevention will also be discussed. (Additional fee required)


PE 2656 Badgerettes Dance Team
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:5)

Description: This course provides a rigorous experience in the process and practice of dance rehearsal and performance in a pre-professional dance team setting. Students perform jazz, hip-hop, lyrical and contemporary styles of dance during halftime periods of football and basketball games as well as other sporting events at Snow College. The group also supports other Snow College activities and performs on campus and in the community multiple times each semester. Audition Required. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Audition
Corequisites: Students must be concurrently enrolled in at least one of the following courses: DANC 1100, 1130, 1200, 1230 or 2100


PE 2676 Cheerleading
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-1:0:2-8)

Description: This is an intercollegiate varsity athletic team. Open-entry, open-exit with permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit.


PE 2850 Special Topics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This course is designed to address a special topic associated with the discipline that may not be included as a part of the normal curriculum.; Topics may be extensions of current field of study or it may include possible future additions to the departmental curriculum.


PE 2891 Intercollegiate Softball - Women
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:10)

Description: This course is for second-year members of the women's intercollegiate softball team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 2892 Intercollegiate Basketball - Women
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2-8)

Description: This course is for second-year members of the women's intercollegiate basketball team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 2893 Intercollegiate Basketball - Men
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:2-8)

Description: This course is for second-year members of the men's intercollegiate basketball team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 2894 Intercollegiate Volleyball - Women
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:10)

Description: This course is for second-year members of the women's intercollegiate volleyball team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 2895 Intercollegiate Football - Men
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:10)

Description: This course is for second-year members of the men's intercollegiate football team at Snow College. Course is not repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required


PE 2896 Intercollegiate Soccer - Men II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:10)

Description: This Course is for second year members of the men's intercollegiate soccer team at Snow College.
Prerequisites: Instructor permission


PE 2897 Intercollegiate Soccer - Women II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:10)

Description: This Course is for second year members of the women's intercollegiate soccer team at Snow College.
Prerequisites: Instructor permission


PE 2936 Intercollegiate Basketball - Men
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:10)

Description: This course is for members of the Men's Intercollegiate Basketball Team at Snow College.Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor


PE 2956 Intercollegiate Football
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:10)

Description: This course is for red-shirt members of the Men's Football Team at Snow College. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor


PE 2997 Physical Education Internship
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on experiences in Physical Education. Internships are an opportunity for students to link theory with practice. They are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help students identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the Physical Education. Internships are individually arranged by the student in collaboration with a faculty member in the PE Department and a supervisor at the workplace. This course is recommended for Freshman and is repeatable for up to 6 credits, with no more than 3 credits per semester. Additional fees required. Internships are typically pass/fail credits. Students desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.


PHIL 1000 Introduction to Philosophy
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is designed to help students better understand themselves and their relationship to the world by reading various points of view related to questions about morality, politics, religion, and approaches to truth.


PHIL 1050 Ethics and Business Leadership
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: The Foundation of Business Leadership course at Snow College explores the philosophical and moral factors that influence professional and institutional success. Using the humanities as a platform, it considers the diverse ways that business principles have been understood and applied across time and cultures. It examines ancient and modern ethical theory in an attempt to comprehend and challenge the moral underpinnings of successful leadership and business. This theoretical investigation is combined with a practical consideration of current case studies in contemporary business.
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission


PHIL 2050 Ethics and Values
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is designed to help students explore personal morality by understanding ethical theories and their application to contemporary ethical issues.
Prerequisites: English 1010 C- or higher


PHIL 2600 World Religion
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: This course is an introductory study of scripture, art, history, belief, and music of religions around the world. This study leads students to discover the values and culture of religious institutions. Students are strongly encouraged to complete ENGL 1010 and ENGL 2010 before taking this course.
Prerequisites: Students are strongly encouraged to complete ENGL 1010 and ENGL 2010 before taking this course.


PHSC 1000 Interdisciplinary Physical Science
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This course is designed to give non-majors a glimpse at physics, chemistry, geology, meteorology, and astronomy, and how they relate to the world around them. It does this by using a conceptual approach to and demonstrations of the most significant and universal laws and models describing the physical world. The course also shows how the different disciplines in the physical sciences overlap and contribute to each other.
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or equivalent


PHSC 1005 Interdisciplinary Physical Science laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: This laboratory class is designed to enhance the learning in the interdiscipinary physical science course (PHSC 1000).; It provides hands on experiments in the physical sciences with emphasis in physics, chemistry, earth science, and space. (Lab fee required)
Corequisites: PHSC 1000


PHSC 2100 Honors Physical Science
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: PHSC 2100 is a study of how modern physical science has evolved, including content from fields such as physics, astronomy, geology, and chemistry. The course looks at science from an historical perspective; science as a process is emphasized over science as a body of facts. This class is taught in an interdisciplinary seminar format with class discussions, presentations, and term papers. It is recommended that you enroll in PHSC 2105 concurrently.
Prerequisites: Math 0900 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.


PHSC 2105 Honors Physical Science Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: This course counts as a physical science lab credit for students enrolled in the physical science class in the Honors Program: PHSC 2100. Students will do selected elementary experiments in physics, chemistry, geology, or astronomy. (Lab fee required)
Corequisites: PHSC 2100


PHYS 1010 Elementary Physics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: PHYS 1010 is a general one semester physics course with a laboratory. This course is designed for nonscience majors and fulfills the general education requirements in physical science. The fundamental principles of physics with emphasis on how a problem is approached and solved are central to the course. Topics include Newton's Laws, gravity, momentum, energy thermodynamics, waves, electricity, optics, and nuclear physics.
Prerequisites: Math 0850 or MATH 0900 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.
Corequisites: Elementary Physics Laboratory (PHYS 1015)


PHYS 1015 Elementary Physics Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: PHYS 1015 is a laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1010. Students will learn techniques of measurement and data analysis. Principles from the lecture course will be demonstrated and tested. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: Elementary Physics (PHYS 1010)


PHYS 1060 Astronomy: Stars and Galaxies
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the night sky and the laws of science that govern heavenly bodies. The question How do we know? will lead students to learn more about stars, galaxies, and the universe itself. Application of physical laws and mathematical solutions to a variety of problems will lead to an understanding of how we know. Regularly scheduled night observations will be held each week. Naked eye observation and binocular observation will be emphasized with some use of telescopes. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: MATH 0850 or MATH 0900 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.


PHYS 1080 Life in the Universe
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: This is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with profound questions about the existence of life. How and why did our existence become possible? Are these conditions necessary for life in general? Could we find life elsewhere in the universe? Where and how should we look? This class includes elements of geology, chemistry, astronomy, and physics. (Class fee required)
Prerequisites: MATH 0850 or MATH 1010 (or equivalent) with a C or better, or ACT math score 21 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.


PHYS 1130 Introduction to Meteorology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: PHYS 1130 is an introductory course in the science of meteorology. The student is exposed to the physical, chemical, and dynamic processes of the atmosphere. Scientific principles that govern the circulation of the atmosphere, heat imbalance, radiation, cloud formation,weather prediction, severe weather, fronts, halos, and rainbows are analyzed. The course considers weather hazards and patterns common to Utah and the local region. Historical weather events are also evaluated in their respective spatial and temporal context.
Prerequisites: Math 0850 or MATH 1010 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT math score 23 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.
Corequisites: PHYS 1135 - Introduction to Meteorology Laboratory


PHYS 1135 Introduction to Meteorology Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: PHYS 1135 is a laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1130. Students will learn techniques of measurement and data analysis. Principles from the lecture course will be demonstrated and tested. (Lab fee required)
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: Introduction to Meteorology (PHYS 1130)


PHYS 1750 The Science of Sound and Music
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science (PS)
Description: PHYS 1750 is a general education physical science course intended for music majors but open to all majors. Major topics will include the science of acoustics including properties of waves and wave phenomena, aural sound perception through hearing, and the production of sound with musical instruments. Each class of instrument and the physical properties will be examined along with musical scales and harmony.
Prerequisites: MATH 1010 or MATH 0850 (or equivalent) with a C or better, ACT math score 21 or higher (or equivalent), or appropriate placement test score.
Corequisites: The Science of Sound and Music Laboratory (PHYS 1755)


PHYS 1755 The Science of Sound and Music Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

General Ed Requirement: Physical Science Lab (LB)
Description: PHYS 1755 is a laboratory course to accompany PHYS 1750. Students will learn techniques of measurement and data analysis. Music principles from the lecture course will be demonstrated and students will perform experiments to analyze properties of waves, sound perception, and the tonal qualities of musical instruments. (Lab fee required.)
Prerequisites: NA
Corequisites: The Science of Sound and Music (PHYS 1750)


PHYS 2010 College Physics I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: PHYS 2010 is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in algebra/trigonometry-based general physics. The course is designed for students majoring in pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, and other biological sciences. The topics covered include the study of kinetics, statics, dynamics, momentum, energy, rotational motion, gravitation, solids and fluids, and thermodynamics.
Prerequisites: MATH 1050 and MATH 1060, or equivalent
Corequisites: PHYS 2015


PHYS 2015 College Physics I Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: PHYS 2015 is the laboratory experience to accompany PHYS 2010. Students will learn techniques of measurement and data analysis. They will learn to communicate scientific results effectively in writing. Principles from the lecture course (PHYS 2010) will be illustrated and experiments confirming class results will be performed. Lab fee required.
Prerequisites: MATH 1050 and MATH 1060, or equivalent
Corequisites: PHYS 2010


PHYS 2020 College Physics II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: PHYS 2020 is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in algebra/trigonometry-based general physics. The course is designed for students majoring in pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, and other biological sciences. The topics covered include vibrations and waves, sound, an introduction to electricity, magnetism, circuits, optics, and relativity. Concurrent registration for the laboratory course PHYS 2025 is required.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2010
Corequisites: PHYS 2025


PHYS 2025 College Physics II Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: PHYS 2025 is the laboratory experience to accompany PHYS 2020. Students will learn techniques of measurement and data analysis and to communicate scientific results effectively in writing. Principles from the lecture course (PHYS 2020) will be illustrated and experiments confirming class results will be performed. Lab fee required.
Corequisites: PHYS 2020


PHYS 2210 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: PHYS 2210 is the first semester of a two-semester sequence in calculus-based physics for scientists and engineers. A It is a necessary preparation for continuing studies in upper division STEM courses. A It includes an introduction to Newton's laws of motion, momentum and energy conservation, rotations, oscillations, waves, and gravitation. A The methods of calculus are applied to develop theories and to solve problems.
Prerequisites: MATH 1220
Corequisites: PHYS 2215


PHYS 2215 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: PHYS 2215 is the laboratory experience to accompany PHYS 2210. Students will learn techniques of measurement and data analysis and to communicate scientific results effectively in writing. Principles from the lecture section will be illustrated. (Lab fee required)
Corequisites: PHYS 2210


PHYS 2220 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: PHYS 2220 is the second semester of a two-semester sequence in calculus-based physics for scientists and engineers. It is a necessary preparation for continuing studies in upper division courses. It includes an introduction to electricity, magnetism, circuits, optics, and relativity. The methods of calculus are applied to develop theories and to solve problems.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2210
Corequisites: PHYS 2225


PHYS 2225 Physics for Scientists and Engineers II Laboratory
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:3)

Description: PHYS 2225 is the laboratory experience to accompany PHYS 2220. Students will learn techniques of measurement and data analysis and to communicate scientific results effectively in writing. Students will get hands-on experience with the concepts taught in the lecture section. (Lab fee required)
Corequisites: PHYS 2220


PHYS 2710 Introductory Modern Physics
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an introduction to modern, or 20th century physics. PHYS 2710 is required for Physics majors, recommended for Chemistry majors and some engineering majors. Topics covered include relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, solid state physics, and cosmology.
Prerequisites: PHYS 2220 (or concurrently) and MATH 2210 (or concurrently)


PHYS 2901 Sophomore Capstone
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (.5:1:0)

Description: This capstone course forstudents majoring in the sciences, mathematics, or engineering is intended to broadentheir scientific horizons, acquaint them with various educational and careeropportunities in their fields, and actively prepare them for transfer to afour-year college or university. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: most of a lower division preparation in a Science, Math, or Engineering major, see course instructor


POLS 1000 American Heritage
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: American Institutions (AI)
Description: This course introduces students to the political, historical, and economic foundations of the United States Constitution.; Through examining and critically analyzing primary sources, students will develop a deeper understanding of the varied ideas and forces that founded, reinforces, and challenges our current constitutional system.; This process will enable students to engage in all levels of politics as more informed and deliberate actors.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


POLS 1100 American National Government
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: American Institutions (AI)
Description: This course is an introduction to the structure, function, and political dynamics of the major actors, ideas, and institutions within the American governmental system.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


POLS 2100 Introduction to International Relations
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Students will examine the international political system; analyze the cause of conflict and the various approaches to peace through a study of balance of power theories, disarmament, diplomacy, and international organizations. Also, students will examine economic forms of power, political economy, environmental concerns, and humanitarian issues within an international framework.


POLS 2200 Introduction to Comparative Politics
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course will expose students to various concepts and theories of comparative politics through the examination of the cultures, structures, institutions, processes and historical contexts in which they occur. Emphasis will be placed on cultural, religious, and ethnic practices and perspectives which shape contemporary society and political institutions. Students will explore the difference between industrialized democracies, current and former communist regimes, and less developed nations by analyzing politics in various case studies such as the United Kingdom, China, France, South Africa and Iran.


POLS 2300 Introduction to Political Theory
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This is an introductory level survey course in political thought.; It will examine the ideas behind, and the political implications of, various political ideologies.; Emphasis will be placed on the writings from authors identifying with these ideologies.


POLS 2400 Special Topics in Political Science
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to make possible the study of a series of one-semester political science topics. The specific subject for any given semester will be shown in the class schedule. Examples of subjects treated in this class are the movement for civil rights in America, congressional reapportionment, or the campaign and electoral process of running for the U.S. Presidency.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


PSY 1010 General Psychology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course offers an introductory survey of general psychology theories and concepts with an emphasis on the scientific study of human behaviors and applications in daily life.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


PSY 1100 Developmental Psychology
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: In this course students learn about the fundamental principles of growth and development from conception through childhood to old age. The course includes the study of the biological process of development, as well as the emotional, social, cognitive, and psychological development of the individual within a cultural and historical context. This course is cross-listed with HFST 1500.


PSY 1234 Psychology in Popular Media
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is designed to demonstrate the prevalence of psychology concepts in our lives. These concepts will be studied through and demonstrated via popular media outlets. Students will view various TV programs, movies, and comic strips which illustrate psychological principles. After such, students will evaluate how and which principles are being displayed. This is a general interest and cross disciplinary course.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


PSY 1400 Analysis of Behavior
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: In this course, students learn about the fundamental principles of learning and behavior. The course reviews topics related to the effective use of conditioning to influence one?s personal behaviors, behaviors of others, as well as animal behaviors. This class has broad application in education, medicine, and even raising a family.
Prerequisites: PSY-1010
Corequisites: PSY-1401


PSY 1405 Analysis of Behavior Lab
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: In this lab, students apply the fundamental principles of learning and behavior as learned in the lecture section.The lab applies topics such as classical and operant conditioning and their ability to change human and animal behavior. Therefore as part of the lab, students work on projects such as: training a virtual rat and creating behavioral interventions.
Prerequisites: PSY 1010
Corequisites: PSY 1400


PSY 2010 Psychology as a Science and Career
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course centers around developing and improving students' scientific and critical inquiry skills. Any student could benefit from this course, but it has emphasis for students who are considering or have declared themselves psychology majors. Students enrolled in the course will gain better understanding of concepts ranging from research design, basic statistics, APA format writing, methods of finding and understanding classic or current social science research, and career options in psychology and related fields.
Prerequisites: PSY 1010


PSY 2034 Educational Psychology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Provides teacher candidates and psychology majors with an overview of the relationship of psychology to teaching and learning. Students will learn about the nature of learning, human brain growth, adjustment and personality, child and adolescent development, learning, measurement, and evaluation, as well as social factors such as culture and gender. An emphasis is placed on applying the theories and practices of educational psychology into day-to-day teaching and learning practices.


PSY 2300 Introduction to Social Psychology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Social psychology is a valuable course not matter what a person is looking at doing with their lives. It informs us about how other people influence our thoughts, actions, and emotions. This course is a survey of the effects of social influences on the basic psychological processes of individuals. The course considers individuals in the context of their culture and society, the development of attitudes, and the impact of the group on individual behavior. Social Psychology has broad applications to education, business, law, and just being in groups.
Prerequisites: PSY-1010


PSY 2370 Intro to Psychology of Gender
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course examines gender issues from a psychological perspective. Topics include the similarities and differences in the psychological experiences of men and women. Students will learn the biological and genetic influences of gender on various dimensions of daily life such as social roles, stereotyping, work roles of men and women and male/female differences in sexual behavior and attitudes.
Prerequisites: PSY 1010


PSY 2720 Psychology Research & Internship
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to help students find and learn from real life experiences in their intended major field of psychology. As students take this course they will complete two main goals: 1) conduct research that will be presentation worthy. 2) they will volunteer at local organizations to gain experience and learn skills valuable in the field.
Prerequisites: Psychology 1010 AND any other Psychology course


PSYC 2400 Experimental Analysis of Behavior
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is concerned with psychological methodology and its application to the fields of learning, conformity, social interaction, attitudes, conflict, and self perception. A self development project is also pursued and analyzed. A field trip is required.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1010
Corequisites: N/A


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SE 3250 Survey of Languages
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course introduces the fundamental programming language concepts of data, type, control, abstraction, and structure; software development and execution environments; and programming language paradigms.
Prerequisites: CS 2420, Full-major Status


SE 3410 Human Factors in Software Design
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course explores the requirements, analysis, design and evaluation of the User Interface in the context of Software Engineering Processes. Usability is one of the key factors determining whether a software project succeeds or fails. Specific methods and design problems will be illustrated with real-world examples in information technology, the internet, communications, multimedia, mobility and speech technologies. This course prepares students to perform usability tasks directly or to successfully manage and collaborate with usability experts.
Prerequisites: CS 2450 and Full-major Status


SE 3450 Principles and Patterns of Software Design
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Principles and Patterns of Software Design will focus on learning patterns that demonstrate how to write code that is easier to understand, easier to debug, and more maintainable. Principles covered will include: separating interfaces from implementation, programming to an interface not an implementation, encapsulating variation apart from constants, and why classes should be open for extension but closed for modifications.
Prerequisites: CS 2450 (Intro Software Engineering), Full-major Status


SE 3520 Database Systems
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course focuses on modern database management concepts (including NOSQL and object) and models; SQL for data definition and data manipulation; database design through normalization; influence of design on the use of indexes; views, sequences, joins and triggers; use of APIs for database access. Comprehensive database project in a team environment.
Prerequisites: Full-major Status, CS 2420


SE 3620 Distributed Application Development
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:0:0)

Description: The course introduces students to the fundamental principles common to the design and implementation of programs that run on two or more interconnected computer systems. It will concentrate on systems and software issues that are critical for building advanced Internet-scale application systems, including web servers, web proxies, application servers, database servers, and a number of prominent Internet application areas.
Prerequisites: SE 3520 (Databases) CS 2680 (Operating Systems)


SE 3630 Mobile Application Development
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course introduces students to application development for mobile devices. Students will learn about the various issues facing mobile application designers, both with respect to hardware constraints and user expectations. Students will learn how to address these constraints with techniques in implementation, software design, and user-interaction design. Students will also learn about concepts at the core of modern mobile computing, such as software and data distribution models and location awareness.The course utilizes the Android OS as the development platform, but the concepts covered in the course are platform independent.
Prerequisites: CS 2420


SE 4120 Management of Software Projects
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course will explore different software project management topics from project concept through development and delivery, based upon best practices. It will explore how to manage projects that use different development methodologies (e.g., waterfall, iterative, or agile methodologies) or a blend of development methodologies. The class will dive more deeply into certain topics in project management, such as Change, Risk, and Portfolio Management; managing global projects and those with virtual teams; and look at some of the reasons why projects fail and what can be done to either keep a project from failing or salvaging a project going south.
Prerequisites: SE 3410


SE 4140 Social and Ethical Issues in Computing
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course examines ethical and social issues arising from the rapid advances in computer and networking technologies. Through this course students will become familiar with the current debates and legislation in the computing field as well as the ethical dilemmas that underlie them.
Prerequisites: SE 3410


SE 4220 Graphical User Interfaces
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course covers the principles and techniques associated with the successful design, implementation, and testing of a graphical user interface (GUI). Most software packages employ some type of GUI which allows operators to interact visually with the software. SE 4220 explores requirements and develops solutions for GUI deployment in the appropriate context of the software under development.
Prerequisites: SE 3250 CS 2450


SE 4230 Advanced Algorithms
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course includes a study of the design and analysis of algorithms for problem solving. This includes characterizing computational problems by their difficulty, applying algorithmic patterns to solve problems, analyzing algorithms for correctness and efficiency, and implementing designed algorithms in software.
Prerequisites: CS 2420, MATH 3310


SE 4320 Personal Software Process
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Personal Software Process (PSP) is intended for practicing software engineers and software development managers. PSP introduces measures that can serve as the basis for software development process improvement in the organization as well as helping individuals improve their own software quality.
Prerequisites: SE 3450


SE 4340 Secure Coding Practices
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: A study of the principles, practices, procedures and methodologies of securely handling, processing and storing data. It examines practices and patterns related to secure code at various levels of the software stack, from user interface code, back end processing and storage. It appraises common attack vectors / methods and how to guard against them.
Prerequisites: SE 3620 - Distributed Internet Application Development


SE 4400 Software Engineering Practicum I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This course is a practical application of software engineering where students will apply knowledge and techniques in an internship or in a senior project.
Prerequisites: SE 3450 SE 3620


SE 4450 Software Engineering Practicum II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: This course is the second in a two-course sequence. This course is a practical application of software engineering skills designed to prepare students for the job market. Students will prepare a portfolio of evidence displaying their knowledge and skills derived from classes, internships or projects.
Prerequisites: SE 4400


SOC 1010 Principles of Sociology
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course introduces students to the discipline of sociology and its unifying objective of linking broad cultural and institutional social forces to personal experiences and human behavior. Using sociological theories and research methods, an examination will be given to diverse sociological perspectives and topics such as culture, family, gender, ethnicity, crime, etc. General education credit and variable credit may be earned. To fulfill social science general education requirements, the class must be taken for 3 credits; however 1-2 variable elective credits are offered for exigent circumstances.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


SOC 1020 Modern Social Problems
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Social and Behavioral Science (SS)
Description: This course is a contemporary study of social problems in society. Origins, challenges and solutions connected to controversial issues such as drug abuse, crime, violence, prejudice, and poverty will be examined critically using sociological perspectives, concepts, and theories. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding and linking causes and effects of wider social forces and problems to personal life experiences. General education credit and variable credit may be earned. To fulfill Social Science general education requirements, the class must be taken for 3 credits; however 1-2 variable elective credits are offered for exigent circumstances.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


SPAN 1010 Elementary Spanish I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

Description: This course provides an introduction to the Spanish language and the cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. It is designed for students with no previous Spanish study. During the course, students develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Spanish in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Spanish at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation and basic conversation practice in Spanish.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


SPAN 1020 Elementary Spanish II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: Foreign Language (FL)
Description: This course is a continuation of SPAN 1010 and provides additional exposure to the Spanish language and the cultures of Spanish-speaking peoples. It is designed for students who have completed SPAN 1010 with a C- or better, or for students with equivalent experience. During the course, students continue to develop basic oral and listening communication skills by participating in activities that require them to use Spanish in a variety of situations. As a result of developing these skills, they also acquire the ability to read and write Spanish at a basic level. Students learn to communicate about topics that are most familiar to them (e.g., self, family, home, school, daily and recent activities), and they learn to appreciate ways of life different from their own. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation, basic conversation practice in Spanish, and additional focus on reading and writing. Successful completion of this course fulfills the foreign language requirement for the A.A. degree at Snow College.
Prerequisites: SPAN 1010 or equivalent
Corequisites: None


SPAN 2010 Intermediate Spanish I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: Foreign Language (FL)
Description: This course reviews and expands upon the communicative aspects of the Spanish language acquired by students in SPAN 1010 and SPAN 1020, by employing three main areas of focus: linguistics, literature and film, and culture. The linguistic focus of the course is on vocabulary development, accuracy of expression, and improved communication. Students review structures and vocabulary learned in elementary courses and use them in longer, more detailed speech and compositions. The literary focus of the course is on the development of reading skills for authentic texts, from both print and other media. The cultural focus of the course is on increasing the knowledge and understanding of the geography, history, and traditions of the Hispanic world. This course is interactive with a focus on learner participation in reading, speaking, listening, and writing in Spanish.
Prerequisites: SPAN 1020 or equivalent experience.
Corequisites: None.


SPAN 2020 Intermediate Spanish II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:5:0)

General Ed Requirement: Foreign Language (FL)
Description: This course is a continuation of SPAN 2010. The goal of this course is to expand upon the communicative aspects of the Spanish language acquired by students in SPAN 2010, in writing, speaking, reading, and listening comprehension. Students continue to develop additional vocabulary improve accuracy of expression, and polish overall communication. Students learn structures beyond those acquired in elementary courses and use them in longer, more detailed speech and compositions. Students also augment their understanding of literature and sharpen their analytical skills through continued development of reading using authentic texts, including Spanish short stories and a dramatic Spanish play. They increase knowledge and understanding of the geography, history, and traditions of the Hispanic world.
Prerequisites: SPAN 2010 or equivalent experience


SPAN 2950 Undergraduate Tutoring
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:0:3-6)

Description: This course is for students with native or advanced proficiency in Spanish who wish to use their knowledge to help other students review, strengthen, and apply language skills taught in all Spanish courses at Snow College. This includes both conversation practice and grammar instruction. Tutors may be asked to proofread documents, grade quizzes or homework, provide feedback, and perform other small tasks as directed by the instructor. Tutors will receive training and support from the instructor.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval and advanced proficiency in Spanish.
Corequisites: None.


SPED 2030 Introduction to Special Education
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is designed to introduce prospective elementary and secondary teachers with an overview of the historical, philosophical, psychological, and cultural forces that affect education. Participants will understand the nature of learning and the diversity of learners from those considered at-risk to those who may be gifted. An overview of the current trends and issues that face the general education teachers in terms of identification, referral and teacher of students who may have learning differences will be presented. The concept of inclusion and the continuum of special education services will be discussed. The participants will be aware of a variety of exceptionalities, specific strategies and adaptations that might be employed to assist in teaching students with learning problems.
Prerequisites: EDUC 1010


SW 1010 Social Work As A Profession
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is a required course for those interested in social work as a profession. Students will be introduced to the basic perspectives and concepts of social welfare in the United States. This course is offered as in-class and online.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


SW 2100 Understanding Human Behavior and the Social Environment
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course will provide students with a social work perspective on human behavior and the social environment. Students will study biological, psychological, and social development through a chronological life span approach.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


SW 2300 Social Welfare as an Institution
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: An introduction to public and private institutions that meet health, recreation, and welfare needs of individuals, groups, and communities. Reviews values that underlie various social welfare institutions and services.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


SW 2400 Diverse Populations
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course examines social and cultural characteristics of various minority groups and emphasizes the use of a variety of resources for solving minority group problems. It is designed to provide content related to the experiences, needs, and responses of ethnic minorities in the United States in order to build community resources to solve potential problems of ethnic minorities. Attention will be given to identifying, exploring, and demonstrating the knowledge,values, and skills essential for multicultural competence in both social work and public educational practices.
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TESL 1000 International Student Orientation
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:2:0)

Description: This course will provide international students with the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and awareness to adapt to college life at Snow College. The course is designed with multiple sections which will help orient students to college life and American culture. These learning sections will address the following issues: adjusting to American college culture, campus services, and US immigration law as it pertains to International students studying in the US. This course may be repeated for credit. (This course is cross-listed with ESL 1000.)
Prerequisites: Students must have a current Foreign Student Visa to attend this course.


TESL 1051 International Partners - 1st year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: In this course students from different countries will be matched as partners to participate in cultural awareness activities. Students will respond to their experiences.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 1052 International Partners - 2nd year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: In this course students from different countries will be matched as partners to participate in cultural awareness activities. Students will respond to their experiences.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 1053 International Partners
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: International and American students will be matched as partners for the duration of one session (8 weeks). Students will participate in cultural awareness activities  and respond to the experiences. There are required activities planned by the course instructor, as well as activities decided on by the partners.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 1151 Community Outreach - 1st year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Students will learn about and prepare oral presentations of a foreign culture of their choice. The cultural presentations will be performed to community organizations in the surrounding area.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 1152 Community Outreach - 2nd Year
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: Students will learn about and prepare oral presentations of a foreign culture of their choice. The cultural presentations will be performed to community organizations in the surrounding area.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 1153 Community Outreach
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: International and American students will learn about and prepare oral presentations representing select aspects of a foreign culture of their choice. These cultural presentations will be performed to community organizations such as schools, churches, civic clubs and governmental groups in the surrounding area.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 1400 Language Teaching Methods
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: Students will gain the tools for language teaching, with a focus on Teaching English as a Second Language. Preparation and presentation of lesson plans is a major focus of this course.
Prerequisites: Native speaker of English or successful completion of the Snow College ESL requirements.


TESL 1600 Language Learning Strategies
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course will focus on the process of language learning, on building confidence in the language learning, and on developing strategies for successful language learning. Students in the course will find that successful language learning is possible for everyone and begin to create their own preferred pathways to proficiency.


TESL 1997 TESL Internship
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: This course is designed to provide hands-on, real-life experience in Teaching English as a Second Language. Internships are an opportunity for student-tutors to connect theory with practice. Internships can introduce student-tutors in the field of Teaching English as a Second Language to solidify their interest and techniques early on in their college experience. Internships are temporary, on-the-job experiences intended to help the student-tutor identify how their studies in the classroom apply to the real-life teaching experiences. Internships can be paid or volunteer, and can be in front of a classroom or on a one-on-one tutoring experience. Student-tutors are encouraged to seek out employment to help with the ESL department needs or at local schools in the area. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits with no more than 3 credits per semester. Each credit requires 45 clock hours of internship experience. Internships are pass/fail credits. Student-tutor desiring a grade will need to negotiate a contract with significant academic work beyond the actual work experience.
Prerequisites: TESL 1400; may be taken concurrently


TESL 1998 First Year Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-6:0:0)

Description: This course is offered through Cooperative Education. Students in the TESL program are required to work in language instruction in order to earn credit. Students may tutor, work as conversation partners, or work as an assistant with the course instructor. Students make goals, follow a plan to achieve the goals, keep a journal, and write a final report.
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in TESL 1400 or completion of TESL 1400
Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in TESL 1400 or completion of TESL 1400


TESL 1999 First Year Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language
Semester(s) Taught: Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-6:0:0)

Description: This course is offered through Cooperative Education. Students in the TESL program are required to work in language instruction in order to earn credit. Students may tutor, work as conversation partners, or work as an assistant with the course instructor. Students make goals, follow a plan to achieve the goals, keep a journal, and write a final report.
Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in TESL 1400 or completion of TESL 1400
Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in TESL 1400 or completion of TESL 1400


TESL 2153 Community Outreach
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: International and American students will learn about and prepare oral presentations representing select aspects of a foreign culture of their choice. These cultural presentations will be performed to community organizations such as schools, churches, civic clubs and governmental groups in the surrounding area.
Prerequisites: TSFL 1153
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 2154 Community Outreach
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: International and American students will learn about and prepare oral presentations representing select aspects of a foreign culture of their choice. These cultural presentations will be performed to community organizations such as schools, churches, civic clubs and governmental groups in the surrounding area.
Prerequisites: TSFL 1154
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 2300 Testing and Evaluation
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: In order for teachers to be successful, the ability to construct effective assessments is vital. This course familiarizes potential teachers of languages with theory and techniques in the construction, analysis, use, and interpretation of second language assessment. It also introduces useful techniques of teacher self-evaluation.
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:


TESL 2650 Language in Society
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: We are all intimately familiar with at least one language: our own. Few native speakers, however, stop to consider what they know about their own language and how their language shapes daily life. This course will provide students with a basic introduction to language and the relationship of language to society. Examples will be taken from a wide variety of languages and cultures. This course is cross-listed with ENGL 2650.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 2660 Introduction to Language Systems
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Humanities (HU)
Description: A general introduction to the theory of language, this course will focus on language systems, including how they exist in linguistic communities, with particular attention to phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Examples of general linguistic principles will be drawn from English as well as other languages. Cross-listed as ENGL 2660.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 2700 Job Search Resources
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is intended for students nearing the end of their professional training in TSFL. It will provide information about and practice in the process of finding rewarding work in the field of language teaching, particularly overseas.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


TESL 2800 Special Projects
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This course involves a special project where there is a demonstrated need which cannot be met through enrollment in a regularly scheduled course. It also could include special projects of unusual merit in furthering a student's professional and academic goals. Students must be able to sustain and complete independent learning projects. The course provides a framework for developing and enhancing student abilities. The Special Projects Contract must be completed, and will indicate the department through which credit will be awarded. Special projects for one credit can be approved by the advisor, the division dean, and the division representative to the Curriculum Committee. Projects for more than one credit must be approved by the advisor, division dean, and Curriculum Committee. Credit for a special project normally should be one to two credit hours depending on the work completed, but may be more with approval of the dean and Curriculum Committee. Unless approved in the contract, special project credit may not be used to satisfy general education requirements. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


TESL 2997 Second Year Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-4:0:0)

Description: This course is offered through Cooperative Education. Students in their second year of the TESL program are required to work in language instruction in order to earn credit. Students may tutor, work as conversation partners, or work as an assistant with the course instructor. Students make goals, follow a plan to achieve the goals, keep a journal, and write a final report.
Prerequisites: Completion of TESL 1400


TESL 2998 Second Year Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-4:0:0)

Description: This course is offered through Cooperative Education. Students in their second year of the TESL program are required to work in language instruction in order to earn credit. Students may tutor, work as conversation partners, or work as an assistant with the course instructor. Students make goals, follow a plan to achieve the goals, keep a journal, and write a final report.
Prerequisites: Completion of TESL 1400


TESL 2999 Second Year Practicum in Teaching English as a Second Language
Semester(s) Taught: Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-4:0:0)

Description: This course is offered through Cooperative Education. Students in their second year of the TESL program are required to work in language instruction in order to earn credit. Students may tutor, work as conversation partners, or work as an assistant with the course instructor. Students make goals, follow a plan to achieve the goals, keep a journal, and write a final report.
Prerequisites: Completion of TESL 1400


THEA 1001 Summer Theatre Workshop
Semester(s) Taught: Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:1-3)

Description: This class is designed for visiting summer school students to help them improve their individual skills, technique, and performance abilities. Credit is variable, depending on workshop length and instructional hours. Enrollment in this class is by permission of the instructor only. Participants must have successfully completed their sophomore year of high school. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor


THEA 1013 Survey of Theatre
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This course is an introduction to the literature, genre, conventions and style of drama as art and performance craft. It provides students with an overview of historical and contemporary theatrical practices.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


THEA 1023 Introduction to Film
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: An introduction to the elements of film, this course is designed to develop an appreciation and understanding of film as an art form. The class explores film criticism, film history, and film-making techniques through discussion and examination of historical and contemporary film.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


THEA 1033 Acting I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This course is an introduction to terminology, improvisation, script analysis and interpretation, body movement, vocal production, acting techniques, and ensemble acting.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


THEA 1080 Theatre Improv Performance Team
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:0:4)

Description: This course provides performance opportunities in Theatrical Improvisation.; All students in the course are required to be on the Snow College Improv Team. The course promotes acting and improv skills through supervised rehearsals and performances. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval


THEA 1113 Voice and Diction
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is a multi-faceted approach to healthy vocal production, diction and dialect. It provides students with both the theory and practice of excellent speech function and expressive communication. Theory and practice in developing command of oral techniques for stage include breath support, resonation, free vocal release, and articulation.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


THEA 1223 Stage Makeup
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:2)

Description: This course is a practical examination into the techniques and artistry of makeup for the theatre. The primary focus is on one- and three-dimensional techniques in corrective, aging, character and period styles.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


THEA 1513 Stagecraft
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2.5:1.5)

General Ed Requirement: Fine Arts (FA)
Description: This course is an introduction to technical theater methods, scenic construction, sound operations, stage lighting, scene painting, and stage management. The course provides opportunity for both theoretical and practical experience in the various aspects of technical theater.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


THEA 1713 Script Analysis
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: How do you begin to interpret a play without seeing it performed? How do you do so with only the text? THEA 1713 introduces you to the study, structures, and application of dramatic text analyisis and interpretation for the actor, designer, technician, and director. Giving you the tools to take a play from the page to the stage.


THEA 1901 Performing Arts Career Exploratory
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course provides students the opportunity to explore careers in theater. The course is project-based; students will propose and complete projects designed to show their research into areas of occupational interest to them, and present these research projects to class members. This course transfers as theater elective credit to 4-year schools.


THEA 2031 Theatre History and Literature: Classical Formerly 1031
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is an exploration of the principal literary periods and styles of drama from the ancient Greeks through the late Renaissance. Students will examine the evolution of Western theatre from its rise in antiquity to its more familiar modern form, investigating how it has changed in its structure, subject matter, and manner and place of performance, as well as how those changes reflect and relate to the roles theater has played in various societies and the changing cultural attitudes toward theater itself. Course may be taken out of sequence.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


THEA 2032 Theatre History and Literature: Modern Formerly 1032
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:3)

Description: This course is an exploration of the principal literary periods and styles of drama from the nineteenth century through the theatre of today. Students will examine the rise of realism, modernity and postmodernity in theatre through the critical lenses of structuralism, semiotics, and identity. The course will investigate changes in written form as well as the role these works played in society, the physical spaces in which they were performed, the manner in which they were acted, and cultural attitudes toward the art form itself. Course may be taken out of sequence.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


THEA 2033 Acting II
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:6)

Description: This course is a continuation of THEA 1033. It expands upon and explores the craft of acting through practical experience and studio activities that will deepen understanding of acting techniques, adding to the actor’s toolbox.; THEA 2033 emphasizes two essential elements an actor faces: script analysis and character work/creation.
Prerequisites: THEA 1033 or instructor
Corequisites: THEA 1033 or instructor


THEA 2080 Theatre Improvisation
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

General Ed Requirement: Oral Communication (OC)
Description: This course is an exploration of spontaneous movement and expression through improvisation. Students will explore individual and group creativity, timing, inventiveness, discovery of emotion, and thought processes. The course provides opportunity for both theoretical and practical experiences in the various aspects of movement improvisation, presentation, research and structure in vocal delivery. Repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


THEA 2130 Play Production
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: A study of the fundamental practices, principles, and techniques associated with producing plays.; Topics include artistic, technical, managerial, and financial elements of a dramatic production.;


THEA 2140 Directing
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:4)

Description: This course is an analysis and laboratory application of theories of stage direction. It examines directing as art and craft, with emphasis upon the director as an interpretive artist, acting coach and administrator/manager. For professional, civic and educational settings.
Prerequisites: THEA 2033 or instructor


THEA 2203 Costume Construction
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:4)

Description: This course is an introduction to the practical experience in sewing, fabric choice, flat pattern modification, fitting, and garment modification. Theoretical introduction to costume design, flat pattern design, and draping.; This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: none
Corequisites: none


THEA 2210 Basic Scenic Design
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course provides theoretical and practical training in scenic design. Students will develop skills and techniques for execution of scenic design for the theatre.; Course studies will include drafting techniques and conventions relevant to the theatre and basic methods of scenic design as applied in contemporary practice.
Corequisites: None


THEA 2233 Acting for the Camera
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:1)

Description: This course is intended to introduce students to the fundamental skills needed to act in film and for the camera and to provide an opportunity for practical experience. It is designed to familiarize the student with techniques of acting--- concentrating on understanding and mastering skills associated with acting for the camera.


THEA 2290 Special Topics in Theatre
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-3:1-3:0)

Description: A variable content course which treats subjects of special interest. The content will change from semester to semester and will be advertised in advance. May be taken by both majors and non-majors. Repeatable for credit.


THEA 2403 Stage Management
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:0)

Description: This course is to instruct and prepare students in the methods and practice of proper stage management. It will prepare the student to execute the responsibilities of a stage manager in college, university, community, and professional theatre. The course will provide opportunities for theoretical and practical experiences. Students will be given opportunities to learn and develop skills in the following areas of stage management. 1- Safety on Stage and in the Scenic Studios 2- Stage Terminology 3- Auditions 4- Production Meetings 5- Managing Rehearsals 6- Backstage Management 7- Calling the Show 8- Scenery Rigging and Shifting Methods 9- Lighting and Sound Supervision 10- Front of House and Public Relations


THEA 2443 Acting for Musical Theatre
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:1)

Description: This course offers students and opportunity to develop skills in merging three separate art forms into one (acting, singing and dancing). It provides opportunity for students to learn to communicate through musical theatre.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


THEA 2510 Scene Painting
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:3)

Description: This course provides a practical examination of the basic techniques of scene painting. It also serves as a unique opportunity for students to see their work on stage by participating in the production of the Snow College theatrical season.; The class is organized as a combination of lecture, demonstration, research, and studio work. This course is repeatable for credit. (Additional fee required)


THEA 2540 Lighting Design
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:2:2)

Description: This course explores the study and application of theory and principles in designing theatrical lighting. Opportunities are provided to exercise theory in practical settings. Students are given opportunities to learn and develop skills in the following areas: (1) design appreciation and aesthetics; (2) the design process; (3) lighting instrumentation, hanging, and focusing; (4) qualities and functions of light; (5) color mixing; and (6) lighting effects.
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None


THEA 2601 Performance Practicum I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course allows application of acting skills through supervised play rehearsals and performances. This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor
Corequisites: Consent of Instructor


THEA 2602 Performance Practicum II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course allows application of acting skills through supervised play rehearsals and performances.This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor
Corequisites: Consent of Instructor


THEA 2603 Performance Practicum III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course allows application of acting skills through supervised play rehearsals and performances.This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor
Corequisites: Consent of Instructor


THEA 2604 Performance Practicum IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course allows application of acting skills through supervised play rehearsals and performances.This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor
Corequisites: Consent of Instructor


THEA 2605 Performance Practicum V
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course allows application of acting skills through supervised play rehearsals and performances.This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor
Corequisites: Consent of Instructor


THEA 2606 Performance Practicum VI
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course allows application of acting skills through supervised play rehearsals and performances.This course is repeatable for credit.
Prerequisites: Instructor
Corequisites: Consent of Instructor


THEA 2611 Production Practicum I
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course is a practical application of basic theatre production skills through supervised play rehearsals and technical crew support experiences. Repeatable for credit.


THEA 2612 Production Practicum II
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course is a practical application of basic theatre production skills through supervised play rehearsals and technical crew support experiences. Repeatable for credit.


THEA 2613 Production Practicum III
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course is a practical application of basic theatre production skills through supervised play rehearsals and technical crew support experiences. Repeatable for credit.


THEA 2614 Production Practicum IV
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course is a practical application of basic theatre production skills through supervised play rehearsals and technical crew support experiences. Repeatable for credit.


THEA 2615 Production Practicum V
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course is a practical application of basic theatre production skills through supervised play rehearsals and technical crew support experiences. Repeatable for credit.


THEA 2616 Production Practicum VI
Semester(s) Taught: Fall, Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1-2:1-2:1-2)

Description: This course is a practical application of basic theater production skills through supervised play rehearsals and technical crew support experiences. Repeatable for credit.


THEA 2901 Theatre Capstone
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:1)

Description: This course provides students the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the concepts and skills necessary for continuation in their field of study in the arts. The course is project-based; students will propose and complete projects designed to show their abilities and present these in a public forum, either live or online. Examples of these projects might include solo performances, audio or video recording of works, or the preparation of an online portfolio. In addition to completing the project, students will learn the skills necessary to present the project, including the necessary computer, print, design, and marketing skills necessary to present their materials to the public.
Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
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WELD 1000 Welding Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: Through lecture, demonstration, and hands on activities, this course is designed to give a student with no prior welding experience an introduction to the welding field. This course will instruct students in the basic skills and principles for oxy-acetylene and shielded metal arc welding, including shop safety and equipment setup.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1007 Principles of Technology I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This applied physics course covers scientific concepts of force, work, rate, resistance, energy, power, transformers, and mathematic computations necessary to perform experiments involving momentum as applied to mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems found in modern industry. Laboratory activities featuring measurement and instrumentation are emphasized.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1008 Principles of Technology II
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:2)

Description: This applied physics course covers mathematic computations necessary to perform experiments involving scientific concepts of vibrations, energy, conversion, transducers, radiation, light, and time constants as applied to mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems found in modern industry. Laboratory activities featuring measurement and instrumentation are emphasized.
Prerequisites: WELD 1007
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1010 Oxy-acetylene Welding and Cutting Processes
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:2:6)

Description: This is a course designed for various trades and community members. This beginning course covers theory and practice of oxy-acetylene fusion welding of sheet steel, including cutting, welding, soldering, and braze welding of ferrous and non-ferrous metal. Muffler shops, farmers, and ranchers use oxy-acetylene equipment to make repairs and fabricate parts.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1012 Oxy-acetylene Welding
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: This is a course for various trades and community members. This beginning course covers theory and practice of oxy-acetylene fusion welding of sheet steel, including welding, soldering, and braze welding of ferrous and non-ferrous metal. Local industries, farmers, and ranchers use oxy-acetylene equipment to make repairs and fabricate parts.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: None


WELD 1015 Cutting Processes
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: This is a course designed for various trades and community members. This course covers theory and practice of oxy-acetylene, carbon arc, oxygen lance, plasma processes and the cutting of ferrous and non-ferrous metal. Local construction, fabrication shops and mining use these processes to make repairs and fabricate parts.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1020 Shielded Metal Arc Welding
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:2:6)

Description: This course is designed for welding technology majors, various trades, and community members. The course is for beginning students interested in learning basic arc welding techniques, theory, and practices, including types of machines, electrodes, and their application. Students study types of joints, expansion and contraction of metals, care and use of tools and equipment, and welding safety.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1030 Related Oxy-acetylene and Arc Welding
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:6)

Description: This course is designed to give students in other programs a background in welding fundamentals that can be used in their career fields. This course will instruct students on the basic skills and principles for oxy-acetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding, and gas tungsten arc welding. Instruction will also be given on shop safety, electrode selection, equipment setup, brazing, soldering, and cutting techniques.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1050 Welding Skills Lab
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This non-credit course provides lab time in 20 hour blocks for individuals who want to improve existing welding skills with minimal instruction and no additional theory work. A basic shop safety test must be completed before entering the lab. Lab hours are to be arranged with the department chair upon registration.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1220 Intro to GMAW
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: This is a course designed for welding technology majors to cover theory and practical hands-on experience with semi-automatic wire-fed machines. Emphasis is on safety and maintenance of equipment, basic fundamentals of each process, mode of transfers associated with gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes, electrode selection, gas selection, proper regulator and flow meter calibration. Joint design and equipment troubleshooting will also be discussed.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1260 Electrical Fundamentals
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course presents the theories and principles of basic electricity, electrical safety, and working precautions as used by welders.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1300 Advanced Arc Welding
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (8:3:15)

Description: This course will cover preventive maintenance for welding equipment, proper service, and troubleshooting of portable engine driven welders and electric powered welding machines. Welding practice is continued with emphasis on multiple pass welding, V groove welding, and pipe welding. Qualification tests must be completed for flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions to complete the course.
Prerequisites: WELD 1020
Corequisites: WELD 1310


WELD 1303 Advanced Arc Welding A
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:2:6)

Description: This course will cover advanced welding techniques and arc-related cutting processes. Welding practice is continued with emphasis on multiple pass welds in all positions. Qualification tests must be completed for flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions to complete the course.
Prerequisites: WELD 1020
Corequisites: None


WELD 1305 Advanced Arc Welding B
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:2:6)

Description: This course will cover preventive maintenance for welding equipment, proper service, and troubleshooting of portable engine driven welders and electric powered welding machines. Welding practice is continued with emphasis on pipe welding.
Prerequisites: WELD 1303
Corequisites: None


WELD 1310 Welding Inspection
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:2:0)

Description: This course is for welding technology majors. It presents skills and techniques to assist welders to better perform their duties. Procedure and qualification testing welds and welders are studied. The course covers inspection procedures and includes destructive and non-destructive testing for the various welding defects.
Prerequisites: Weld 1020
Corequisites: Weld 2020


WELD 1313 Welding Inspection A
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is for welding technology majors. It presents skills and techniques to assist welders to better perform their duties. Qualification testing weld procedures are studied. The course includes inspection procedures and destructive testing for the various welding defects.
Prerequisites: WELD 1020
Corequisites: WELD 1303


WELD 1315 Welding Inspection B
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:1:0)

Description: This course is for welding technology majors. It presents skills and techniques to assist welders to better perform their duties. Qualification testing weld procedures are studied. The course includes inspection procedures and non-destructive testing for the various welding defects.
Prerequisites: WELD 1020, WELD 1313
Corequisites: WELD 1305


WELD 1420 Intro to GTAW
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: This course is for welding technology majors. It covers basic fundamentals of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1600 Welding Electrical and Electronics I
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:3:2)

Description: This course covers the principles and laws that govern electrical circuits, including Ohm's and Kirchhoff's Laws. Student will also gain understanding of the use of meters, wiring diagrams, wiring repair, transformers, conductors, semiconductors, PN junctions, diodes, transistors, multiplexing, computers, and sensors.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 1999 Cooperative Education Experience
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (1:0:2)

Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to apply knowledge and techniques learned in the classroom to actual job experience. Classroom instruction must precede the job experience or the student must be registered for courses at the same time the student is enrolled in the work experience.
Prerequisites: Instructor approval required.
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 2009 Practical Welding
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (2:1:3)

Description: This course is a continuation of WELD 1000. More advanced techniques of welding are taught on shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding, and cutting processes. Special needs of specific students may also be covered; e.g., welding problems or techniques, qualification, certification, and fabrication projects.
Prerequisites: WELD 1000 or equivalent
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 2020 Advanced ARC Welding
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:2:6)

Description: This course will cover preventative maintenance of welding equipment, proper service and troubleshooting of portable engine driven welders and electric powered welding machines. Welding practice is continued with emphasis on multiple pass welding and V groove welding. Qualification tests are offered for horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions throughout the course.
Prerequisites: WELD 1020
Corequisites: WELD 1310 is recommended but not required.


WELD 2200 Semi-Automatic Welding Processes
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (8:3:15)

Description: A course designed for welding technology majors to cover theory and practical hands-on experience with semi-automatic wire-fed machines. Emphasis is on safety and maintenance of equipment, basic fundamentals of each process, mode of transfers associated with gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and flux core arc welding (FCAW) processes, and electrode selection, gas selection, proper regulator, and flow meter calibration. Joint design and equipment troubleshooting will also be discussed.
Prerequisites: WELD 1300
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 2210 Blueprints for Welders
Semester(s) Taught: Fall
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (5:5:0)

Description: This course studies basic print interpretation and visualization for industrial applications. It includes weld symbols and covers layout techniques from shop drawings to fabrication of sheet metal, plate, pipe, and structural shapes. Lab experience is included.


WELD 2220 Advanced GMAW
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:6)

Description: This is a course designed for welding technology majors to cover theory and practical hands-on experience with advanced semi-automatic wire-fed machines. Emphasis is on safety and maintenance of equipment, basic fundamentals of each process, mode of transfers associated with gas metal arc welding (GMAW), submerged arc welding (SMA), spool gun and dual feed processes, electrode selection, gas selection and proper regulator and flow meter calibration. Joint design and equipment troubleshooting will also be discussed.
Prerequisites: WELD 1220
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 2230 Advanced FCAW
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:6)

Description: This is a course designed for welding technology majors to cover theory and practical hands-on experience with advanced semi-automatic wire-fed machines. Emphasis is on safety and maintenance of equipment, basic fundamentals of each process, mode of transfers associated with flux core arc welding (FCAW), inner shield, dual shield, electrode selection, gas selection, proper regulator and flow meter calibration. Joint design and equipment troubleshooting will also be discussed.
Prerequisites: WELD 2220
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 2300 Welding Fabrication
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (3:1:6)

Description: This course is for welding technology majors. It covers safe setup and operation of shears, break press, iron workers, band saw and drill press. Students will fabricate a project using their knowledge of print reading and layout procedures.
Prerequisites: WELD 2020, WELD 2220, WELD 2210, WELD 1715
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 2320 Metallurgy
Semester(s) Taught: Spring
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:4:0)

Description: Metallurgy is the science that explains the properties, behavior, and internal structure of metals. The course emphasizes welding carbon and alloy steels used with metals, such as cast iron. Discussions and demonstrations are given on various methods of heat treatment and metal properties.
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 2400 Industrial Joining Processes
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (8:3:15)

Description: This course is for welding technology majors. It covers common current industrial welding processes; i.e., gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), resistance, and specialized processes.
Prerequisites: WELD 2200
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 2420 Advanced GTAW
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (4:2:6)

Description: This course is for welding technology majors. It covers gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), aluminum, stainless and plate welding processes; i.e., resistance and specialized processes.
Prerequisites: WELD 1420
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 2520 Advanced Pipe Welding
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (6:2:12)

Description: This course is for welding technology majors and will cover advanced pipe welding using SMAW and FCAW processes. Welding practice is continued with emphasis on pipe welding using SMAW and FCAW. Qualification tests are offered as part of the course on a variety of positions.
Prerequisites: WELD 2020, WELD 2230
Corequisites: N/A


WELD 2600 Principles of Welder Certification
Semester(s) Taught: TBA
Credits, Lecture hours, Lab hours: (0:0:0)

Description: This course is for experienced welding professionals and those who employ or supervise welding personnel. It presents skills and techniques to assist welders to better perform their duties. The meaning and value of welding procedures, welder qualification, and welder certification are studied. Weld inspection techniques covered include destructive and non-destructive test methods. Opportunity to take a welding certification test is included.